Free eBook Fantastic Four download

by Peter David

Free eBook Fantastic Four download ISBN: 1416511040
Author: Peter David
Publisher: Gardners Books; 1st paperback edition edition (June 30, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 320
Category: Humour and Entertainment
Subcategory: Movies
Size MP3: 1232 mb
Size FLAC: 1117 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: txt lit rtf azw


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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Scientific genius Dr. Reed Richards's lifelong dream is close to being realized-a trip to space and to the center of a cosmic storm to unlock the secrets of the human genetic code.

Fantastic Four is the name of several comic book titles featuring the team Fantastic Four (created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby) and published by Marvel Comics.

Fantastic Four is the name of several comic book titles featuring the team Fantastic Four (created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby) and published by Marvel Comics, beginning with the original Fantastic Four comic book series which debuted in 1961. As the first superhero team title produced by Marvel Comics, it formed a cornerstone of the company's 1960s rise from a small division of a publishing company to a pop culture conglomerate

Peter David is the New York Times bestselling author of numerous Star Trek novels, including the incredibly popular New Frontier series

Peter David is the New York Times bestselling author of numerous Star Trek novels, including the incredibly popular New Frontier series. In addition, he has also written dozens of other books, including his acclaimed original novel, Sir Apropos of Nothing, and its sequel, The Woad to Wuin. David is also well known for his comic book work, particularly his award-winning run on The Incredible Hulk. He recently authored the novelizations of both the Spider-Man and Hulk motion pictures. He lives in New York.

Peter David wrote this novelization of the film based on the screenplay by Mark Frost, Simon Kinberg, and Michael France, which is, in turn, based on the Marvel comic book. Reed Richards is a weenie.

Mr Fantastic, The Invisible Woman, the Human Torch and the Thing use. Peter David wrote this novelization of the film based on the screenplay by Mark Frost, Simon Kinberg, and Michael France, which is, in turn, based on the Marvel comic book. Ben Grimm clobbers stuff.

Fantastic Four – Ebook written by Peter David. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Fantastic Four. After a freak accident aboard a test flight bombards them with radiation, permanently altering their genetic structures, four adventurers use their incredible powers for the good of mankind and to protect the world from the forces of evi. espite their very real problems, worries and arguments.

Mr Fantastic, The Invisible Woman, the Human Torch and the Thing use their incredible powers for the good of mankind and to protect the world from the forces of evil, and Dr Doom.

item 2 David Peter-Fantastic Four Prodigal Sun (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW -David Peter-Fantastic Four .

item 2 David Peter-Fantastic Four Prodigal Sun (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW -David Peter-Fantastic Four Prodigal Sun (US IMPORT) BOOK NE. item 4 FANTASTIC FOUR THE PRODIGAL SUN GRAPHIC NOVEL (112 Pages) New Paperback -FANTASTIC FOUR THE PRODIGAL SUN GRAPHIC NOVEL (112 Pages) New Paperback.

See: The Fantastic Four Comic Books Category for a complete list. See: Fantastic Four for all the variations of the subject on the site. See: Fantastic Four for the main version of the subject. Categories: Templated Articles

See: The Fantastic Four Comic Books Category for a complete list. Categories: Templated Articles. Comic Disambiguation Pages.

Books related to Fantastic Four. Being Human: New Frontier Peter David.

Fantastic Four - Peter David. Johnny Storm needs a smack upside the head. Sue Storm is played by Jessica Alba in the movie, which is more than enough reason to watch it. The book is ok. The comics are better. Published in mass-market paperback by Pocket Books.

After a freak accident aboard a test flight bombards them with radiation, permanently altering their genetic structures, four adventurers use their incredible powers for the good of mankind and to protect the world from the forces of evil...despite their very real problems, worries and arguments. But soon they must face the diabolical and destructive plans of their ultimate enemy: Dr Doom, a brilliant man hungry for forbidden knowledge and thirsty in his obsessive pursuit of profit and revenge...
User reviews
Qumenalu
Thou this book does follow the movie ALMOST exactly, I would say dispite some of the other reviewers of this book that the movie version added some touches of humor and changed/tweeked some of the scenes from the book.

Like adding the scene of Doom stealing the heat seeking missile and launcher as well as the tanks of super cool gas where the book just mentions that Doom tinkered with the gas and always had the missile launcher just hanging around the office.

It does expand on some scenes that probably ended up on the cutting room floor to make the movie move along a lot faster and in comparing the two, the movie comes out ahead vs the book. but the book does add more details on things that might appear in the dvd unedited version(s).

This book makes a good read when flying or on a long bus trip and IF you want to see what the movie left out (or was changed in the movie) then read this book.
Yozshugore
A great adaption of the movie for F4 fans.
Ericaz
Well written, makes me feel like I'm watching the movie scene by scene. Excellent compliment to the original movie. I gained insight on the characters that I didn't have before.
greed style
Dr. Reed Richards is sure he has found a scientific breakthrough. All he has to do is convince billionaire (and nemesis) Victor Van Doom, to help him reach a cosmic storm in order to observe it. While Victor agrees to the use of his private space station, the price is almost all profit made from this research. On the space station, Reed and the rest of his team: best friend, Ben Grimm; ex-girlfriend, Susan Storm; her hotshot brother, Johnny Storm; as well as Doom himself, are shocked when something goes amiss and everyone is exposed to the cosmic storm.

Back on Earth, they discover that the cloud has altered their DNA, giving each a type of super power. Reed, Susan, Ben, and Johnny band together in an effort to analyze what has happened to them and find a way to reverse the effects. Mr. Fantastic: Reed has the ability to stretch and contort his body. The Invisible Woman: Susan can make herself invisible and create an energy shield. The Human Torch: Johnny is able to go up in flames- literally- and fly. The Thing: Ben is now rock-hard and has superhuman strength. Unfortunately, Van Doom has also been given powers, and unlike the others, decided to use them for evil. Now he is bent on revenge for the loss of power the cosmic storm fiasco caused and will do anything to destroy Reed and the rest of the `Fantastic Four'.

While the Fantastic Four novelization was not up to the same level as others have been, it was still a good read. There were a couple discrepancies between the book and movie, which was a little annoying. The storyline itself focused on how the FF got their powers and why they became a team more than anything else. The book makes the characters seem a little more real, which I liked.
Kardana
These days I don't often read tie-in novelizations of upcoming films, preferring to wait and experience the actual movie, which most would agree is probably the best way to discover a story designed for the screen. But novelizations can often be fun, and this one was written by the talented comic book writer Peter David (who adapted the film script written by three other folks), so I figured I'd give it a whirl.

Sadly, if the movie sticks close to the story in this paperback, it will end up being a wasted opportunity to bring something great to the screen. In the comments that follow, I'll discuss this book, but I'm really talking about the movie on which the book is based.

Overall, Mr. David does his best to make the story work in book form, toning down idiotic sight gags (yes, Reed Richards gets kicked in a sensitive place by Ben Grimm when Reed tests Ben's reflexes with a little hammer blow to Ben's newly-rocky knee), but in the end two adjectives come to mind to describe this story: silly and thin.

What's depressing is that this is the Fantastic Four, the title that established Marvel Comics' famous formula of heroics combined with melodrama, where the heroes can save the world one issue but not be able to make its lease payment on their headquarters the next. Where wonderment and imagination permeated every issue of the original FF comic book no matter the personal dilemmas taking place. Other movies should be looking in reverence to the Fantastic Four movie to see how a super-hero movie should be done. Sadly, though, it's probably a good idea that other films don't emulate this one. Because this Fantastic Four movie, based on what's in this novel, doesn't trust its own pedigree, and instead cynically includes touchstones from our "popular" culture to make the story more "approachable".

It's not amazing enough that Johnny Storm can burst into flames and roar through the skies. No, we better have him first discover his powers while snowboarding with a hot nurse, catching fire while gaining speed on his board. Then, the next time he displays his powers, it's while participating in an X-Games/Extreme sports tournament, bursting into flames while doing stunts on a cycle. I can almost hear the story conference: "What do the kids like these days? I got it, snowboarding and all that Extreme sports stuff. Let's work that in somehow." Since when does the FF need the latest hip & trendy gimmicks to sell what they're all about? Did the X-Men movie need to do this? Did Spidey? Why did the producers feel the need to "help" the FF this way?

The Dr. Doom stuff is okay, but just so, well... thin. Doom is nothing at all like the classic villain in the FF comics. Here, he's just a guy who's mad at Reed Richards for frustrating his attempts to make money from the cosmic storm experiment, and for wooing Sue away from him. These are believable motivations, but not very interesting ones. And having Doom slowly turning into a being of metal, ala the X-Men's Colossus, was a needless change. Doom's "superpower" was always his intellect. Insane intellect, but intellect. And why NOT keep him as the monarch of the fictional Balkan country of Latveria? There are tons of examples of male monarchs in recent history (Prince Rainier, for one), monarchs who studied in the U.S. during their formative years and could have met a Reed Richards type and established an uneasy friendship. Then Reed could have went to his friend- now a monarch in Europe- and asked for funding for the cosmic ray experiment. But here Doom is just a boring Donald Trump type, with a little scientific knowledge. Hey, I know super-hero movies need to make some changes from the original comics source material, but why take out great, entertaining aspects of the original material and replace them with watered-down stuff?

I could go on and on, but I'll just make one or two more quick observations: Picturing Jessica Alba as I read this novelization, I began to feel that she is much too glamourous for the role of Sue Storm. I have no problem with her being in the movie, but she would have been better off as one of Johnny's girlfriends. Or better yet, as Alicia Masters. Wouldn't that be a kick... the monstrous Thing's girlfriend geing hotter than any of the women following Johnny around? It would add an interesting subtext to Ben's and Johnny's friendship, his secret jealousy of Ben's girlfriend. But, no, they went for a much simpler and less interesting idea: let's make Sue really hot.

To end on a positive note, there's a pretty good battle at the end in the streets of New York (though it doesn't really do anything new), and, earlier, a nice scene in a planetarium between Reed and Sue, as they begin to reach out to one another. And, without revealing too much, the producers leave things open for the return of Dr. Doom in a sequel, a Dr. Doom much closer to the conception of the character in the comics. We'll see.

But, in the end, and just from reading the novelization, I'd give the story a C/C- (readable but nothing special) and the characterizations a B/B+. And, who knows, if they don't junk up the movie with too much rock music, and the Extreme sports stuff doesn't take center stage TOO much, we may still have a watchable movie that will permit the production of a better sequel.

Oh, one final thought: none of the criticisms mentioned above are Peter David's fault. He didn't write the movie, only this novelization of it. He remains an entertaining writer who did his best here, though one gets the feeling he wrote some scenes through gritted teeth, and refused to fully embrace those scenes containing especially heavy doses of dumb-ness. But I don't think anyone will hold that against him. After all, most people agree with the old saying that says (paraphrased in a less vulgar way here) there are certain things that simply can't be polished.