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Free eBook Fred Allen's Radio Comedy (American Civilization) download

by Alan Havig

Free eBook Fred Allen's Radio Comedy (American Civilization) download ISBN: 0877228108
Author: Alan Havig
Publisher: Temple University Press (October 10, 1991)
Language: English
Pages: 296
Category: Humour and Entertainment
Subcategory: Humor
Size MP3: 1411 mb
Size FLAC: 1806 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: doc lrf azw txt


It's a scholarly work on Fred Allen's radio career, and has a factual approach.

J. Fred MacDonald, Curator of the Museum of Broadcast Communication, Chicago. It's a scholarly work on Fred Allen's radio career, and has a factual approach. Alan Havig gives a great deal of detail about Allen's radio programs and the commercial and other circumstances under which they were created. In Allen's day, network radio programming was largely governed by sponsors and advertising agencies.

Fred Allen's Radio Comedy book. Fred Allen's Radio Comedy (American Civilization). 0877227136 (ISBN13: 9780877227137). A notable example of radio at its best  . In this book, Alan Havig explores the roots of his comedy, the themes it exploited, the problems and challenges that faced the radio comedy writer, and Allen's unique success with the one-dimensional medium of radio.

Book Description: A Stephens College (Missouri) professor of history here examines Allen's (1894-1956) 20 years in vaudeville, his career in radio from 1933 to 1949, and his characteristic brand of air-wave comedy, and concludes that Allen was a literary humorist who created "comedy uniquely aural in achievement and appeal.

The Fred Allen Show was a popular and long-running American old-time radio comedy program starring comedian Fred Allen and his wife Portland Hoffa. Over the course of the program's 17-year run, it was sponsored by Linit Bath Soaps, Hellmann's, Ipana, Sal Hepatica, Texaco and Tenderleaf Tea. The program ended in 1949 under the sponsorship of the Ford Motor Company.

Fred Allen's Radio Comedy. Tracing a career that lasted from 1912 into the 1950s, Havig describes the "verbal slapstick" style that was Fred Allen's hallmark and legacy to American comedy

Fred Allen's Radio Comedy. Tracing a career that lasted from 1912 into the 1950s, Havig describes the "verbal slapstick" style that was Fred Allen's hallmark and legacy to American comedy. Alan Havig is Professor of History and American Studies at Stephens College in Columbia Missouri. Fred was one of the greatest of vaudeville and radio comedians. Anyone even casually concerned with the state of American humor will be well advised to give his work, as Mr. Havig presents it, careful study.

A notable example of radio at its best

A notable example of radio at its best. -Back Stage/SHOOTIn 1954, James Thurber wrote: You can count on the thumb of one hand the American who is at once a comedian, a humorist, a wit, and a satirist, and his name is Fred Allen.

Are you sure you want to remove Fred Allen's Radio Comedy (American Civilization Series) from your list? Fred Allen's Radio Comedy (American Civilization Series). Published March 1992 by Temple University Press.

Fred Allen, a leading network radio comedian from 1932 to 1949, was one of the few . He denied the truth of cherished American beliefs and toppled sacred national idols.

In a medium which strove to avoid the controversial, Allen performed three important functions of the social critic. He challenged the authority of dominant social groups, particularly business leaders, most particularly network radio executives. Finally, he defended the freedom of the individual artist especially writers and performers, in the mass media.

Fred Allen, American humorist whose laconic style, dry wit, and superb timing influenced a generation of radio and . While working as a stack boy in the Boston Public Library, the young Sullivan came across a book on juggling from which he picked up that craft.

Fred Allen, American humorist whose laconic style, dry wit, and superb timing influenced a generation of radio and television performers. He began juggling on amateur entertainment circuits and took the stage name Fred St. James (later Fred James).

Several decades after his death and more than forty years since his radio program left the air, Fred Allen's reputation as a respected humorist remains intact. This is a study of the development of the radio industry, a discussion of American humor, and the story of how one relates to the other.
User reviews
Mushicage
While this book is not a barrel of laughs in itself, it's not meant to be. It's a scholarly work on Fred Allen's radio career, and has a factual approach. Alan Havig gives a great deal of detail about Allen's radio programs and the commercial and other circumstances under which they were created. In Allen's day, network radio programming was largely governed by sponsors and advertising agencies. The fact that Allen was able to create such great comedy, despite pressure from overly-cautious ad types and network brass, shows his creativity and strength of character. Those of us who are used to Jay Leno and David Letterman fearlessly poking fun at network executives need to remember that, over sixty years ago, Fred Allen took the risks that made their satires possible. Steve Martin is right about comedy not being pretty; a lot of work, sweat and hassles go into the best of it. Once you read this and find out what was behind Fred Allen's radio career, you will appreciate his jibes against pretentious network vice-presidents and pompous advertising language even more. Enjoy Allen's shows and books by all means, but also read this to learn about the man and what has behind his work.
Priotian
This book reads like somebody's doctoral dissertation. The writing is dry and pedantic. Really awful. Robert Taylor's book was much better--but of course the best thing would be to read Allen's two books (Treadmill To Oblivion and Much Ado About Me).