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Free eBook Better, faster, lighter Java) download

by Justin Gebtland ZHU Bruce A. Tate

Free eBook Better, faster, lighter Java) download ISBN: 7508342887
Author: Justin Gebtland ZHU Bruce A. Tate
Publisher: China Electric Power Press (1991)
Category: Home, Hobbies and Crafts
Subcategory: Home Improvement and Design
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In Better, Faster, Lighter Java authors Bruce Tate and Justin Gehtland .

In Better, Faster, Lighter Java authors Bruce Tate and Justin Gehtland argue that the old heavyweight architectures are unwieldy, complicated, and contribute to slow and buggy application code. Written for intermediate to advanced Java developers, Better, Faster, Lighter Java, offers fresh ideas-often unorthodox-to help you rethink the way you work, and techniques and principles you'll use to build simpler applications. You'll learn to spend more time on what's important. When you're finished with this book, you'll find that your Java is better, faster, and lighter than ever before. Скачать (chm, 772 Kb). Epub FB2 PDF mobi txt RTF.

Better, Faster, Lighter Java' is very useful to me because: a) Its main contention that programmers need to be aware . One more thing, the book is written by Bruce Tate and Justin Gehtland, however, almost the entire book is written in the first-person singular.

Better, Faster, Lighter Java' is very useful to me because: a) Its main contention that programmers need to be aware of and avoid Java "bloatware" agrees with my experience; b) Its authors provide some criteria to use to decide whether a Java technology is well designed; and c) It provides some alternative Java technologies to use as comparisons with ones that are too. "heavy" and not as flexible or extensible. All this was done in a relatively brief book (itself rather "light").

In Better, Faster, Lighter Java, authors Bruce Tate and Justin Gehtland argue that the old heavyweight architectures are . Bruce Tate - Bruce Tate, an independent consultant, is a pundit and writer of books about software

In Better, Faster, Lighter Java, authors Bruce Tate and Justin Gehtland argue that the old heavyweight architectures are unwieldy, complicated, and contribute to slow and buggy application code. Издательство: "O'Reilly Media" (2004). Bruce Tate - Bruce Tate, an independent consultant, is a pundit and writer of books about software. He is a father of two who is a kayaker and mountain biker in his spare time.

Bruce A. Tate, Justin Gehtland. The book starts off well and the author makes several good points about having lighter objects and not being tied to a particular framework, but then it digresses into refactoring evangelism. Despite what this apologist believes, design cannot be neglected altogether as refactoring becomes more and more expensive as a system grows larger and parts get more complex. Just look at all the items still left over from Java . or . How many methods has Sun deprecated that are still around? Take many of the concepts to heart up to about page 50, then just chuck the.

Bruce Tate and Justin Gehtland have made a tremendous effort of popularizing some fundamental principles that, when applied consistently, can considerably ease your life. They introduce the following basic principles: "Keep it simple", "Do one thing and do it well", "Strive for transparency", "You are what you eat" and "Allow for extension".

In Better, Faster, Lighter Java, authors Bruce Tate and Justin Gehtland argue that the old heavyweight architectures are unwieldy, complicated, and contribute to slow and buggy application code

In Better, Faster, Lighter Java, authors Bruce Tate and Justin Gehtland argue that the old heavyweight architectures are unwieldy, complicated, and contribute to slow and buggy application code. Производитель: "O Reilly Media". Sometimes the simplest answer is the best.

Better, faster, lighter Java. Better, faster, lighter Java. by. Tate, Bruce, 1965-. Sony Alpha-A6300 (Control). urn:acs6:tate:epub:5f7-27037deaaf6a urn:acs6:tate:pdf:d34-a71bade2fd4c. ark:/13960/t0ns8rs40.

Better, Faster, Lighter Java book. In Better, Faster, Lighter Java, authors Bruce Tate and Justin Gehtland argue that the old heavyweight architectures are unwieldy, complicated, and contribute to slow and buggy application code. ByJustin Gehtland,Bruce A. Tate. This book is about lighter, faster technologies and it relies heavily on the opinions and work of some pioneers. Thanks to the folks at IntelliJ, for use of a fantastic IDE. We used it to create ImnaBneytteorf,tFhaesetexra,mLpiglehsteinr Jtahvisa baouotkh. eedaNnedwJaursdti,nedionlgd JSR h17ea5v, yawnedigfohrt pees,rsspuecchtivaes. WTeedb,Loygoiuc,sJcBaoressm, aen, d, awraeyu(nswoimeledtyim, es).

Better, Faster, Lighter Java" does a great job of walking the reader down a path to successful J2EE projects. Bruce and Justin explain the motivations behind concepts like test-driven development, continuous integration, scope definition and creep, and the trade-offs of coupling. In the vein of "Bitter Java" and "Bitter EJB", it exposes some of the myths - both procedural and technical - in today's J2EE world. They then show examples of how to implement these concepts in an enterprise Java project. These concepts are absolutely critical to any non-trivial project, as they make or break the ongoing maintainability of a project.

User reviews
Daigrel
I recommend the first set of chapters in this book for EVERYONE. While it helps to know J2EE/EJB to step through the examples, the author provides a wonderful, thought-provoking and inspiring coverage of software design in general.

The first pieces of the book (actually, up to Chapter 7: Hibernate) discuss the joys and perils of simplistic approaches, over-architecting, under-architecting, evaluating available libraries/APIs, etc.

This is a great coverage of the software engineering process from gathering requirements to coding and from choosing a programming language to dealing with management. A simple, easy read.

The downfall of the book is that it doesn't promise what it advertises: Better, Faster, Lighter Java. The primary focus is on the underlying, architectural choices, not on the Java language itself. However, my downfall was purchasing based on title (as a dual-Amazon suggestion) instead of reading the description.
Kulwes
This is a very good book. A must for anyone willing to be a good programmer. It is a great feeling to find a book that has the guts to stand out and say: "EJB sucks real bad !!! Stay way from it as much as you can!"

If you write complicated code that only you can understand, if you are proud of your complicated solutions, then you need this book in order to succeed in your programming career.

However I found this book a little boring, as it has too much text and few code examples. Like Inversion of Control and Dependency Injection, two important topics, the author explain them with text instead of code. But like a CD, a book can be worth the money for just a few pages.

The author is very humble, but he probably belongs to the dream team of Java professionals. He just gets the work (efficiently) done, and that is what customers care about. To understand what I am trying to say, read the chapter about the Simple Spider. I didn't understand very well his code, but he solved a complex problem, actually a 18000 bucks problem, with simple solutions.
Karg
I am an experienced programmer, having used Java and many other languages on a variety of projects. In the last 2-3 years Java, and especially server-side Java has become increasingly important to me at work and I now spend a great deal of my time trying to understand the roles and relationships of the various J2EE technologies and their alternatives. For the most part I find these kinds of discussions worthwhile and very interesting.

'Better, Faster, Lighter Java' is very useful to me because: a) Its main contention that programmers need to be aware of and avoid Java "bloatware" agrees with my experience; b) Its authors provide some criteria to use to decide whether a Java technology is well designed; and c) It provides some alternative Java technologies to use as comparisons with ones that are too "heavy" and not as flexible or extensible. All this was done in a relatively brief book (itself rather "light").

Hence I appreciate this book for the synthesis of ideas it provides, the questions it raises and for its introducing me to alternative Java technologies that I'll now seek more in-depth treatments of.
Nilabor
This book is really divided into two virtual sections: one outlining the principles of coding excellence, and the second section deals with technology choices that align with those principles. The first half explains the common wisdom of the day, which is to stay focused on the problem, keep the components decoupled and transparent, and to use unit tests and refactoring to keep the code slim (to "Sharpen the Saw" to borrow a term from Covey). There are other points that he makes but I found it to be mostly common sense if you've spent anytime developing Java in recent times.

The second half of the book provides a survey of technologies that help you apply these principles: such as Hibernate and Spring. However, it is a survey, and to use any of these technologies you have to get a more in-depth book.

I did find the section on the class loader to be good. I saw Justin Gehtland at the "No Fluff Just Stuff" Java conference and he gave a really in-depth presentation on this topic.

One more thing, the book is written by Bruce Tate and Justin Gehtland, however, almost the entire book is written in the first-person singular. Weird.
virus
I was hoping this would be a great reference with good examples for Spring and Hibernate. I am a bit disappointed as I was looking for a good instruction book.
Fani
This book with its talk of the business "sponser" was not even spell checked. The code will not compile because in Java declarations are case sensitive. Whole paragraphs are repeated. The content is vague and seems to be more of a rant than an attempt to teach.

Horrible. One star is generous.