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Free eBook Mini Farming: Self-Sufficiency on 1/4 Acre download

by Brett L. Markham

Free eBook Mini Farming: Self-Sufficiency on 1/4 Acre download ISBN: 1602399840
Author: Brett L. Markham
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing; 32638th edition (April 1, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 240
Category: Home, Hobbies and Crafts
Subcategory: Gardening and Landscape Design
Size MP3: 1530 mb
Size FLAC: 1142 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: lrf rtf lit mbr


Start a mini farm on a quarter acre or less, provide 85 percent of the food for a family of four and earn an income.

Start a mini farm on a quarter acre or less, provide 85 percent of the food for a family of four and earn an income. I was dismayed, disgusted and disappointed by the complete lack of respect this writer showed his readers.

If you want to go quickly, go alone. If you want to go far, go together. How to Win Every Argument. 36 MB·348,890 Downloads.

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Электронная книга "Mini Farming: Self-Sufficiency on 1/4 Acre", Brett L. Markham

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Mini Farming: Self-Suffic. has been added to your Cart. I eat grass - once converted to beef - but all those grass pictures could have been replaced with pictures of his own 1/4 acre intensive garden - assuming he actually has one. It's not clear at all from the book

Mini Farming: Self-Suffic. It's not clear at all from the book nothing at all that is unique or special to an intensive garden. Look at urbanhomestead dot org for an example of great pictures of intensive gardening.

Mini Farming : Self-Sufficiency on 1/4 Acre.

Start a mini farm on a quarter acre or less, provide 85. .

Start a mini farm on a quarter acre or less, provide 85 percent of the food for a family of four and earn an income.

Mini Farming describes a holistic approach to small-area farming that will show you how to produce 85 percent of an average family’s food on just a quarter acre—and earn $10,000 in cash annually while spending less than half the time that an ordinary job would require. Even if you have never been a farmer or a gardener, this book covers everything you need to know to get started: buying and saving seeds, starting seedlings, establishing raised beds, soil fertility practices, composting, dealing with pest and disease problems, crop rotation, farm planning, and much more. Because self-sufficiency is the objective, subjects such as raising backyard chickens and home canning are also covered along with numerous methods for keeping costs down and production high. Materials, tools, and techniques are detailed with photographs, tables, diagrams, and illustrations.
User reviews
Orll
I have read maybe fifty books on farming techniques, and had really high expectations for this one. Sadly, it is one of three books I have asked a refund on since I started buying books on Amazon back around 2001. I was dismayed, disgusted and disappointed by the complete lack of respect this writer showed his readers. Instead of illustrating his ideas, and giving us details, each chapter followed the same formula: " A: here is an idea I stole from someone else. B: this is who I stole it from. C: brief summary of stolen idea. D: want to know more? Read a book from the original author of the idea I stole!" I'm not making this up! Please save yourself the money and buy "Urban Homestead " by Kelly Coyne or "Gaia's Garden" by Toby Hemenway or better yet, subscribe to Mother Earth News instead. These are only 3 of the myriad of truly helpful publications you would be better off buying. BTW, Mother Earth News has a wonderful website wth free info. So does Urban Homestead. Forewarned is forearmed. Yards are for food, not chemicals. :-)
catterpillar
This was quite a disappointment. We have a couple of acres that we're planning on farming when we retire and we figured that if you can do it on a quarter acre then it should be easy to grow most of what we need on our property so we bought this in print and kindle. We should have saved our money on both.

The book completely fails to deliver on the promise, in fact, there's almost no mention of how to grow intensively and virtually no pictures of the author or anyone else actually doing it. There are a few stock photos of vegetables and then maybe 20 or 30 copies of the same photo of long grass in the book. What's up with that? I eat grass - once converted to beef - but all those grass pictures could have been replaced with pictures of his own 1/4 acre intensive garden - assuming he actually has one. It's not clear at all from the book.

90% of the content of the book is standard articles easily available in any gardening book, magazine, website, or a dozen other places on how to create compost, how to plant, how to harvest, etc... nothing at all that is unique or special to an intensive garden. Look at urbanhomestead dot org for an example of great pictures of intensive gardening. You'll find nothing at all like that in this book.
Fenrikree
So much information in this book! My wife and I were new to gardening and this book is now our go to reference for anything garden related!
Kecq
This book really is an excellent guide to how you might approach *Organic* gardening, with short shrift paid to methods heavy on toxic pesticides. That is good, because a topic as broad as farming has to be given a certain focus.

Markham seems to know his topic but at times he
omits useful details. Perhaps this was due to space constraints, or time constraints. Maybe he never expected this book to be much of a success. I think that it needs to be published in a second edition, with more details in certain areas, much more sturdy binding, and perhaps without the exact same illustration that takes up 3/4 of a two page spread at the start of every chapter.

Like others have pointed out, it is well organized and full of useful, Valuable information. However, you will want to do your own research and please remember that even organic agriculture has its own variances of opinion on the proper ways of doing something.
MeGa_NunC
I've been making attempts at gardening for a few years, and I've read dozens of gardening books (I'm big into doing my research). This book is EXACTLY what I was looking for when I first started out. It's a book written by someone else who also admits to doing tons of research -- and trying out lots of different gardening approaches: Mel Bartholomew's Square Foot gardening, John Jeavons' Grow More Vegetables, Biodynamics, Biointesive, and lots of others. These are all books I have on my shelf too. Markham has tried them all, and here in his "Mini Farming" book he gives you a step-by-step method incorporating the best ideas from all his research and experimentation. This book is IT. It is ALL YOU NEED in one volume. My husband and I are using it as our homesteading Bible this year, and we refer to it daily. I have never come across a volume with such breadth AND depth, PLUS it is written so that the instructions are easily followed. I recommend this book HIGHLY. In fact, I'm here ordering a gift copy as a housewarming present for my brother who is just getting started with gardening. I can't say enough good things about it. It is up-to-date on all the latest research, it includes information on such things as bio-char, intensive agriculture, plant nutrients, and everything else you need to know for a productive small homestead. Get it -- you WON'T be disappointed.