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Free eBook The FBI and the Catholic Church, 1935-1962 download

by Steve Rosswurm

Free eBook The FBI and the Catholic Church, 1935-1962 download ISBN: 1558497293
Author: Steve Rosswurm
Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press (January 15, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 344
Category: Historical
Subcategory: World
Size MP3: 1369 mb
Size FLAC: 1393 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: lit docx doc mbr


-James T. Fisher, author of Communion of Immigrants: A History of Catholics in America

Steve Rosswurm explores the history of that relationship from the turbulent 1930s to the 1960s, when growing Catholic opposition to the Vietnam War led Hoover .

Steve Rosswurm explores the history of that relationship from the turbulent 1930s to the 1960s, when growing Catholic opposition to the Vietnam War led Hoover to distance himself from the Church. Drawing on a vast range of sources, including thousands of pages of previously classified FBI files, Rosswurm pursues his investigation along two parallel tracks. First, he looks at the joint war waged by Hoover and the Catholic hierarchy against forces considered threats to their organizations, values, and nation.

Academic journal article Church History . The FBI and the Catholic Church, 1935-1962. By Gallagher, Charles . Rosswurm, Steven. Academic journal article Church History. In his book The Irish Diaspora in America, Lawrence J. McCaffery quoted the then-conservative columnist and former Nixon speech-writer Garry Wills as claiming that FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover liked to employ Roman Catholics in the FBI "because of their intensive, almost neurotic loyalty to the United States" (, 205).

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Catholic clergy in the church's teachings on labor, which was later expanded to parishes. Rosswurm, Steve (2010). Saxon, Wolfgang (1994)

Catholic clergy in the church's teachings on labor, which was later expanded to parishes He was also Assistant Director of the Department of Social Action for the National Catholic Welfare Conference. Around the end of the Second World War, Cronin wrote a report for the bishops on the Communist Party of the United States. Saxon, Wolfgang (1994). John F. Cronin, 85: Priest and an Expert on Race Relations. First, he looks at the joint war waged by Hoover and the Catholic hierarchy against forces considered threats to their organizations, values, and nation

The FBI and the Catholic Church, 1935-1962. Athan Theoharis has owed us this book for some time

The FBI and the Catholic Church, 1935-1962. Athan Theoharis has owed us this book for some time. He has had a career battling and pursuing the FBI and forcing it to open files that meticulously document the FBI’s imperial aggrandizement and constant intrusion into the political sphere. All of us are in his debt. -Stanley I. Kutler, author of The Wars of Watergate. Brings to light missing or previously hidden parts of the FBI’s storied history to help us more clearly see its potential for both good and harm as we try to balance national security and civil liberties in a post-9/11 world.

Main Author: Rosswurm, Steve. United States - History. Special Agent Man : My Life in the FBI as a Terrorist Hunter, Helicopter Pilot, and Certified Sniper. Surveillance in America : Critical Analysis of the FBI, 1920 to the Present.

During his long tenure as director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, J. Edgar Hoover made no secret of his high regard for the Catholic faith. Though himself a Protestant, he shared with Catholicism a set of values and a vision of the world, grounded in certain assumptions about the way things ought to be in a well-ordered society. The Church reciprocated Hoover's admiration, establishing the basis for a working alliance between two powerful and influential American institutions. Steve Rosswurm explores the history of that relationship from the turbulent 1930s to the 1960s, when growing Catholic opposition to the Vietnam War led Hoover to distance himself from the Church. Drawing on a vast range of sources, including thousands of pages of previously classified FBI files, Rosswurm pursues his investigation along two parallel tracks. First, he looks at the joint war waged by Hoover and the Catholic hierarchy against forces considered threats to their organizations, values, and nation. Second, he examines how each pursued its own institutional interests with the help of the other.While opposition to communism was a preoccupation of both institutions, it was not the only passion they shared, according to Rosswurm. Even more important, perhaps, was their fervent commitment to upholding traditional gender roles, particularly the prerogatives of patriarchal authority. When women and men carried out their assigned obligations, they believed, society ran smoothly; when they did not, chaos ensued. Organized topically, The FBI and the Catholic Church, 1935–1962 looks not only at the shared values and interests of the two institutions, but also at the personal relationships between Hoover and his agents and some of the most influential Catholic prelates of the time. Rosswurm discusses the role played by Edward A. Tamm, the FBI's highest-ranking Catholic, in forging the alliance; the story behind Father John Cronin's 1945 report on the dangers of communism; the spying conducted by Father Edward Conway S.J. on behalf of the FBI while treasurer of the National Committee for Atomic Information; and Monsignor Charles Owen Rice's FBI-aided battle against communists within the CIO.
User reviews
inform
Great book, sent expeditiously!!
Shadowbourne
Steve Rosswurm is to be congratulated for his doggedness in pursuing secret FBI files, as well as numerous other sources in church and labor archives across the country, to tell the story of the hard fought war against Communism waged by the alliance between the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) under their longtime and controversial head, J. Edgar Hoover, and various bishops, priests, and lay Catholics of the pre Vatican Council II Church. Although he provides overall linkage in his text, the six chapters are relatively self contained, reflecting their development as academic papers and articles over the past two decades as Professor Rosswurm's research and thinking evolved regarding the various fronts on which this conflict raged. These fronts ranged from the halls of government and academia to the print and airwaves of the media and beyond to the Church pews and fields and factories of labor.
Laitchai
Many Generational Americans, in the country before the "american revolution" and definitely before the 1865 war, should read this and similar titles, which document the reality of how many other religions, and politically organized religions function in the u.s. today. Whether their own churches have mysteriously folded, or they do not understand why "people just don't follow the constitution," or why bankers such as Philip Hart opened the American border, transforming the country "demographically" in a short period of time, making it majority catholic (when previously it had been radically protestant through most of its history), or why things "don't seem to be like they used to," or as if people have lost their freedom of speech, religion, association and so on, this is a good read. Also for Generational Americans who have slowly vacated the "inner cities" in which the majority of the whites are catholic (like nyc, chicago, etc.), and who wonder "how things turned out this way," or feel they "no longer have a voice," it's a good book. It lays out a part of the vatican in american life, the uptick since "vatican II," and things s/a Reagan who seems to have hid his religion, offering the pope full diplomatic ties, and so on. A fascinating read.
Rleillin
This book could be easier to read, but is a worthwhile addition to my personal library. It is full of well-researched information on a period of American history that has otherwise vanished down the memory hole, the struggle against the Communist Party of the United States (CPUSA) from the Thirties until the early Sixties. It is also a reminder of how independent the FBI was from an Administration that was indifferent to the issue and how powerful the Catholic Church was. It rehabilitated Hoover's reputation, and it reminded me of how much America has changed, culturally as well as economically. The struggle over union control involved American manufacturing and a working class that desired to be able to support a family and a home on single wage-earner salary. Nothing but weapons are built here now. No working class man can support a family on his salary alone. Marxism is discredited everywhere outside of Cuba and academia. Terrorism has replaced Communism as a threat and the Catholic Church is mired in pedophilia scandals.