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Free eBook Religions of the Silk Road: Overland Trade and Cultural Exchange from Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century download

by Richard C. Foltz

Free eBook Religions of the Silk Road: Overland Trade and Cultural Exchange from Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century download ISBN: 0312214081
Author: Richard C. Foltz
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 1st edition (October 1, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 186
Category: Historical
Subcategory: World
Size MP3: 1177 mb
Size FLAC: 1662 mb
Rating: 4.3
Format: rtf lrf lit rtf


I first read this book for a course on the History of the Silk Road, and have just re-read it for a course on Global Asia.

Feb 15, 2018 J rated it it was amazing. I first read this book for a course on the History of the Silk Road, and have just re-read it for a course on Global Asia.

During the latter decades of the nineteenth century, popular European fascination with the world beyond reached an. .RICHARD C. FOLTZ is Professor of Religion at Columbia University

During the latter decades of the nineteenth century, popular European fascination with the world beyond reached an all-time high. The British and French empires spanned the globe, and their colonial agents sent home exotic goods and stories. The Silk Route dates from this romantic period, in name. FOLTZ is Professor of Religion at Columbia University. He is the author of Mughal India and Central Asia and Conversations with Emperor Jahangir.

Throughout this excellent book Professor Foltz makes clear the importance of trade and cultural exchanges in the . This book covers all the basics of religion that you need to know. It also helps you better understand the Silk Road and its importance to the global spread of religious ideas.

Throughout this excellent book Professor Foltz makes clear the importance of trade and cultural exchanges in the unfolding of history. -"Journal of World History" "Foltz takes us on an instructive journey through time and space, revealing the fluidity of barriers, geographical and otherwise, on the historical trail and bypaths of the 'Silk Road, ' which stretches from China in the East and across Central.

New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999. Three thousand years ago, not only goods and people but also cultures journeyed through the Silk Road (Neelis, 2001). Article in The Journal of Asian Studies 60(04):1180 - 1182 · November 2001 with 10 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. Today, cultures can travel far faster than they could do so at the time of Persian Empire. Problematizing Latent Colonialism.

Road: Overland Trade and Cultural Exchange from Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century.

Religions of the Silk Road: Overland Trade and Cultural Exchange from Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century.

Trade and Cultural Exchange from Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century. PBS Home Video, 2000.

Foltz, Richard C. Religions of the Silk Road: Overland Trade and Cultural Exchange from Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1999. An insightful short book on the topic. Horton, Mark, and John Middleton. The Swahili: The Social Landscape of a Mercantile Society. Oxford: Blackwell, 2000. The opening parts of this video discuss the growth of both the Silk Roads and the Sea Roads from China to the West. This series explores key sites along the Silk Roads. Thailand and Cambodia: Temples of Glory.

Section: Silk Road religions. Next: Judaism and the Silk Route. Next: Judaism and the Silk Route Library availability. Setting a reading intention helps you organise your reading. Your reading intentions are private to you and will not be shown to other users. What are reading intentions?

Collectors and Dealers: The Trade of Egyptian Antiquities - Продолжительность: 42:36 Harvard Semitic Museum Recommended for you. 42:36

Collectors and Dealers: The Trade of Egyptian Antiquities - Продолжительность: 42:36 Harvard Semitic Museum Recommended for you. 42:36. Раскопки на железной реке, вещи из Ила, поиск с металлоискателем Юрий Гагарин - Продолжительность: 22:11 Юрий Гагарин - Russian war diggers Recommended for you.

By r i c h a r d c. foltz. This concise, compact work explains how cultural traditions, especially in the form of religious ideas, accompanied merchants and their goods along the overland Asian trade routes in pre-modern times (ca. 1000 b. c. 1400 c.

The core idea is that trade is the backbone of cultural exchange. The result is mostly that Islam came to dominate in Central Asia because Muslims dominated in trade. Somehow Buddhism dominated in . hmm, were Buddhists expert traders too? Or was Kublai Khan's Buddhist advisor particularly persuasive? Anyway the central argument of the book is interesting and somewhat useful. At least it provides some glue to hold the book together

Foltz, who holds a PhD in history from Harvard and has taught at Brown, Columbia, and Gettysburgh College, looks behind the romantic notions of the colonial era and tells the story of how cultural traditions, especially in the form of religious ideas, accompanied merchants and their goods along the overland Asian trade routes in pre-modern times. In telling how Hebraic and Iranian religious ideas and practices traveled eastward (to be followed later by the great missionary traditions of Buddhism, Christianity, Manichaeism, and Islam), he reveals how the silk Road was a formative and transformative rite of passage. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
User reviews
Swift Summer
I came around this book because it is often cited in books on Central Asia, the Silk Road, Buddhism and also in the last book I read on Xuanzang. The Authors that use it as a citation do not want to explore more deeply some concepts they are treating at the moment so they indicate this text with such an encompassing title as the ultimate resource for omitted information. So when you finally see the book, the small dimensions dampen a little the enthusiasm.

Certainly, the subject is large and the chronological time interval extends from the first millenium BCE to the fifteenth centure CE, while the geographical boundaries go from China to Persia and from North India to Russia considering all the Silk Road extensions. Simplification of such a vast panorama is evidently necessary and this is precisely what the Author has done. He has succeeded in condensing the history of well known and less well known religions into a comprehensive didactic text.

The first chapter states the epistemiological guidelines utilized: the importance of trade for diffusion of religion, the supposed role of women in the transmission of faiths, the division between proselytizing and non proselytizing religions and the difference in acceptance of new beliefs from the center to the periphery, the consideration of the practicality and belonging to the dominant social class as the main drive to acceptance of new forms of faith.

In the following chapters Zoroastrism, Buddhism, Judaism, Nestorian Christianity and Islam are all described and a brief story of their expansion and fortunes is delineated. The book makes two really good points in these chapters one is on the syncretism of all these religions in time and space on the Silk Roads and the other is the concept of Central Asia as a refuge for heretics. Another interesting aspect for non accademics is the description of less well known sects such as the Radanites (merchant Jews from France that practically converted the Khazars)and the description of the Kushan reign that disappeared forever in the sands of history.

Finally there is a wide overview on the religious conquest by Islam of the entire Central Asia and the fading away of all other religious beliefs. The role of sufis is emphatized more than that of the sword. There is one chapter called "Ecumenical mischief" that seems like a small essay inserted in this otherwise schematic text, that dwells on the attempts of missionaries of all faiths to convert the Mongols and on the intestine quarrels between Nestorians and Muslims in the Il-Khan lands. The indepth outlook of these episodes makes one desire the whole book were written with such a research detail since the bird view approach is one of its defects.

Accademic reviewers affirm Prof. Folz makes a few mistakes in dates and historical interpretations and that he has utilized exclusively English sources. The general reader, naturally, does not capture these subtle details. However, since this book is really very cited and has the great advantage of covering such a wide time and space span, a new and revised edition would be welcomed.

The reading is fluent and sometimes it is necessary to reread in order to fully appreciate all the information. The Notes and the Bibliography are rich, so this text can be of help to students, entertain historical fans even if it does fall short of completeness and real satisfaction.
Marirne
This book covers all the basics of religion that you need to know. It also helps you better understand the Silk Road and its importance to the global spread of religious ideas.
Neol
I received an older version of the book, meaning content was different. Could not use for the class. The posted image is false advertisement.
Kirimath
This is a wonderful story of the religious and other cultual interchanges in central Asia a thousand years ago. Unfortunately, Mr. Foltz does not have the ability to tell that story in an engaging manner. Foltz, he admits this, digests a huge amount of information in order to tell this story. The result is that it is not enough for the academic specialist and not well enough told for the generalist. Thus the text suffers. Still, as a short text that introduces the whole realm of the religious history of central Asia, there is much to be learned. This text is only a small taste of the variagated history of the area.
Kata
This is a lovely book. Artfully written and insightfully presented, Foltz does an outstanding job of covering a variety of complex topics in a relatively short space. I first got a copy via interlibrary loan while doing research, but liked the book so much I ordered a copy just to have it handy.
Dagdalas
I picked up Foltz's book because I've been long interested in how early Sumerian beliefs, as described in cuneiform texts, made their way unwittingly (or otherwise) into the Hebrew belief system and Christianity. I wondered if this could also have happened along the Silk Road, and how.
The Silk Road ran from far west Central Asia to China, with a northern routes and a southern route through Iranian lands. Because the Silk Road was started by merchants for trading purposes, the merchants would sincerely or insincerely assimilate the religious and cultural practices along the route in order to increase business prospects. So, what could start out as "pure" religious ideology at one point on the road would take on other ideologies along the way, become popularized to reflect local beliefs, and end up a mixture of all sorts of beliefs by the endpoint. Kind of what your junk drawer looks like after a few years of adding this and taking out the other. If I were to use a metaphor for the Silk Road, it would the taffy pull machine at the fair that takes a glob of colorful sugar and stretches and and blends it to make it homogenous and no longer recognizable as the original glob. It could also be likened to the candy, "Divinity with Nuts."
American educational systems tend to distinguish various religions as being uniquely independent from each other when that is certainly not the case. This very readable book teaches us otherwise.
If I were to criticize it for one thing, it would be the map at the beginning of the book. I would have like to have seen more city/community/commercial centers, rivers, and other regions/oases identified.