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Free eBook Scylla: Myth, Metaphor, Paradox download

by Professor Marianne Govers Hopman

Free eBook Scylla: Myth, Metaphor, Paradox download ISBN: 1107026768
Author: Professor Marianne Govers Hopman
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (February 25, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 317
Category: Historical
Subcategory: World
Size MP3: 1547 mb
Size FLAC: 1710 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: docx azw lrf rtf


Scylla: Myth, Metaphor, . .has been added to your Cart. This book uses the example of a famous sea-monster from Greek myth to challenge the view that a mythical name denotes a single clear-cut 'figure' and to demonstrate how the same symbol can express a range of anxieties.

Scylla: Myth, Metaphor, . Of interest to students and scholars working in classics, mythology and gender studies.

Scylla: Myth, Metaphor, Paradox - Libro electrónico escrito por Marianne Govers Hopman. Marianne Govers Hopman is Assistant Professor of Classics and Comparative Literary Studies at Northwestern University, Illinois. Lee este libro en la app de Google Play Libros en tu PC o dispositivo Android o iOS. Descarga Scylla: Myth, Metaphor, Paradox para leerlo sin conexión, destacar texto, agregar marcadores o tomar notas.

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What's in a name? Using the example of a famous monster from Greek myth, this book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Scylla: Myth, metaphor, paradox. Article · January 2010 with 19 Reads

Scylla: Myth, metaphor, paradox. Article · January 2010 with 19 Reads. Cite this publication. Proceeding through detailed analyses of Greek and Roman texts and images, Professor Hopman shows how the same name can variously express anxieties about the sea, dogs, aggressive women and shy maidens, thus offering an empirical response to the semiotic puzzle raised by non-referential proper names. Do you want to read the rest of this article?

Using the example of a famous monster from Greek myth, this book challenges the dominant view that a mythical symbol denotes a single, clear-cut 'figure' and proposes instead to conceptualize the name 'Scylla' as a combination of three concepts - sea, dog and woman - whose articulation changes over time.

oceedings{eGH, title {Marianne Govers Hopman, Scylla : Myth, Metaphor, Paradox}, author {Sheila Murnaghan}, year {2017} }. Sheila Murnaghan.

Marianne Govers Hopman. What's in a name? Using the example of a famous monster from Greek myth, this book challenges the dominant view that a mythical symbol denotes a single, clear-cut 'figure' and proposes instead to define the name 'Scylla' as a combination of three concepts - sea, dog and woman - whose articulation changes over time

Marianne Govers Hopman. Scylla : Myth, Metaphor, Paradox. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Marianne Govers Hopman. Using the example of a famous monster from Greek myth, this book challenges the dominant view that a mythical symbol denotes a single, clear-cut 'figure' and proposes instead to conceptualize the name 'Scylla' as a combination of three concepts - sea, dog and woman - whose articulation changes over time.

What's in a name? Using the example of a famous monster from Greek myth, this book challenges the dominant view that a mythical symbol denotes a single, clear-cut 'figure' and proposes instead to conceptualize the name 'Scylla' as a combination of three concepts - sea, dog and woman - whose articulation changes over time. While archaic and classical Greek versions usually emphasize the metaphorical coherence of Scylla's various components, the name is increasingly treated as a well-defined but also paradoxical construct from the late fourth century BCE onward. Proceeding through detailed analyses of Greek and Roman texts and images, Professor Hopman shows how the same name can variously express anxieties about the sea, dogs, aggressive women and shy maidens, thus offering an empirical response to the semiotic puzzle raised by non-referential proper names.