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Free eBook School Board Battles: The Christian Right in Local Politics (Religion and Politics) download

by Melissa M. Deckman

Free eBook School Board Battles: The Christian Right in Local Politics (Religion and Politics) download ISBN: 1589010019
Author: Melissa M. Deckman
Publisher: Georgetown University Press (February 27, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 244
Category: Historical
Subcategory: World
Size MP3: 1626 mb
Size FLAC: 1673 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: rtf docx azw docx


Washington College Assistant Professor Melissa M. Deckman delivers readers a fresh new portrait of the Christian right which, although still critical of their ultimate end goals, wants to understand how they were able to achieve their successes or not. Differing from the organizational.

School Board Battles studies the motivation, strategies, and electoral success of Christian Right school board candidates. Based on interviews, and using an extensive national survey of candidates as well as case studies of two school districts in which conservative Christians ran and served on local boards, Melissa M. Deckman gives us a surprisingly complex picture of these candidates. Deckman examines important questions: Why do ns run for school boards? How much influence has the Christian Right actually had on school boards? How do conservative Christians govern?

Melissa Deckman restores some balance with an interesting study of Christian Right activity in school board politics. Do you want to read the rest of this article?

Melissa Deckman restores some balance with an interesting study of Christian Right activity in school board politics. Do you want to read the rest of this article?

Teyssier Ronan, Melissa M. Deckman, School Board Battles. Washington (DC), Georgetown University Press, coll

Teyssier Ronan, Melissa M. The Christian Right in Local Politics. Washington (DC), Georgetown University Press, coll. Religion and Politics , 2004, 224 p. , Archives de sciences sociales des religions, 2005/3 (No 131-132), p. 24-24. MLA. Teyssier, Ronan. Melissa M.

School board battles: The Christian right in local politics. Georgetown University Press, 2004. Religion makes the difference: Why Christian Right candidates run for school board. Women with a mission: Religion, gender, and the politics of women clergy. LR Olson, SES Crawford, MM Deckman. University of Alabama Press, 2005. Clergy and the Politics of Gender. Of mama grizzlies and politics: Women and the Tea Party. Steep: The Precipitous Rise of the Tea Party, 171-191, 2012.

School Board Battles book.

An expert on gender, religion, and American politics, she is the author or co-author of four books, including Tea Party Women and School Board Battles: The Christian Right in Local Politics, winner of the 2007 Hubert Morken Award for the best book on Religion & Politics from th. .

An expert on gender, religion, and American politics, she is the author or co-author of four books, including Tea Party Women and School Board Battles: The Christian Right in Local Politics, winner of the 2007 Hubert Morken Award for the best book on Religion & Politics from the American Political Science Association.

by Melissa M. Deckman. If there is a culture war taking place in the United States, one of the most interesting, if under-the-radar, battle-grounds is in local school board elections. Rarely does the pitch of this battle reach national attention, as it did in Kansas when the state school board-led by several outspoken conservative Christians-voted to delete evolution from the state's science curriculum and its standardized tests in August 1999.

At the introductory level, Professor Deckman teaches American Government and Politics.

In addition to more than a dozen scholarly articles, I am the author of School Board Battles: the Christian Right in Local Politics (Georgetown University Press 2004), winner of the Hubert Morken Award, given by the American Political Science Association biennially to the best work on religion and politics. At the introductory level, Professor Deckman teaches American Government and Politics.

If there is a "culture war" taking place in the United States, one of the most interesting, if under-the-radar, battlegrounds is in local school board elections. Rarely does the pitch of this battle reach national attention, as it did in Kansas when the state school board―led by several outspoken conservative Christians―voted to delete evolution from the state's science curriculum and its standardized tests in August 1999. That action rattled not only the educational and scientific communities, but concerned citizens around the nation as well.While the movement of the Christian Right into national and state politics has been well documented, this is the first book to examine their impact on local school board politics. While the Kansas decision was short-lived, during the past decade in school districts around the country, conservative Christian majorities have voted to place limits on sex education, to restrict library books, to remove references to gays and lesbians in the classroom, and to promote American culture as superior to other cultures. School Board Battles studies the motivation, strategies, and electoral success of Christian Right school board candidates. Based on interviews, and using an extensive national survey of candidates as well as case studies of two school districts in which conservative Christians ran and served on local boards, Melissa M. Deckman gives us a surprisingly complex picture of these candidates. She reveals weaker ties to national Christian Right organizations―and more similarities between these conservative candidates and their more secular counterparts than might be expected.Deckman examines important questions: Why do conservative Christians run for school boards? How much influence has the Christian Right actually had on school boards? How do conservative Christians govern? School Board Battles is an in-depth and in-the-trenches look at an important encounter in the "culture war"―one that may well determine the future of our nation's youth.
User reviews
Maldarbaq
Fallon presents investigative reporting of the attack by fundamentalist religion on our public school system at the ground level. Among other issues, the book well presents how the teaching of critical and independent thinking is being undermined in the public school system across the nation by a well funded and organized ideology.
Dream
I had to use the book for a Political Science project in college, and I found it to be completely boring and hard to read. The chapters and the information contained within each does not flow very well and is very confusing. I attend the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and I found this book to be a chore to read and repetitive. To make the best of this book, just read the bold and larger titles and don't waste your time reading the monotonous details.
Adoraris
Washington College Assistant Professor Melissa M. Deckman delivers readers a fresh new portrait of the Christian right which, although still critical of their ultimate end goals, wants to understand how they were able to achieve their successes or not.

Differing from the organizational research reports and partisan titles which already flood the market, Deckman's book has readers instead consider why the religious right enjoys so much electoral success even if a majority of American voters do not formally appear to support their ideas.

She then wants us to consider how waging a campaign/counter campaign against these candidates and public officials is literally impossible when we actually do not know about the people who we want to run against.

The thesis of Deckman's book is that both sides in a community demonize each other in the process of school board and local elections in an attempt to win support from undecided voters. The Christian right is at once both more similar and more complex than previous attack campaigns/counter-responses publicly have conceded. Articulating this complex nature will then enable myself and others to win more campaigns and more effectively sell our own policies to that swing public.

Starting out with wanting to make major change, the Christian right candidates and/or elected officials subsequently are required to alter their grand world views in order to be a part of the system which they ultimately seek to change. Built on compromise, the American political system is subsequently not receptive to radical changes which these people (and other candidates) would like to make. Our campaign portrayals of these people might therefore indicate what they would like to do, but it does not actually acknowledge what they are permitted to do; held in check by the American government's system of checks and balances.

Deckman's data includes case studies of elections held in Fairfax County Virginia and Garret County Maryland. These case studies prove that although they share some important group characteristics and goals, not all Christian right campaigns and then the candidates who run them are virtual `carbon copies' of each other. A vulnerability to internal dissent among various religious right candidates and office holders further lessens their being the `mighty boogeyman' of political jargon.

She also suggests that both the `far right' candidates and my beloved liberal counterparts are much more alike than we actually are different. The research in this book uncovers that non-religious right school board candidates are also likely to be religiously affiliated and also are more likely to come from the community elite---who can afford to run in an election and hold public office. We have more in common with each other than we have previously thought and/or let on in campaigns and debates.

Although I also read the more conventional broadsides against the right, and tend to agree with the left, Deckman's book is a critical step for defeating Christian right candidates.