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Free eBook Enduring Creation: Art, Pain, and Fortitude download

by Nigel Spivey

Free eBook Enduring Creation: Art, Pain, and Fortitude download ISBN: 0520230221
Author: Nigel Spivey
Publisher: University of California Press (June 4, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 272
Category: Historical
Subcategory: World
Size MP3: 1996 mb
Size FLAC: 1521 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: lrf rtf docx lit


I purchased this book after reading Nigel Spivey's other book, How Art Made The World, and also watched the .

I purchased this book after reading Nigel Spivey's other book, How Art Made The World, and also watched the compelling BBC video that accompanied this. not just man's triumphs but also man's deepest, anguished hours. Why do we do this? What is the connect of pain to pleasure? What drives us to create and recreate, even the deepest sorrow. For example, how many many paintings, how much art, has been created that has.

Andrew Miller examines Enduring Creation: Art, Pain and Fortitude by. .

Andrew Miller examines Enduring Creation: Art, Pain and Fortitude by Nigel Spivey. Spivey describes this work, fashioned by unknown hands between 2BC and AD1, as "the prototypical icon of human agony".

Enduring Creation book. Start by marking Enduring Creation: Art, Pain, and Fortitude as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Nigel Jonathan Spivey (born 16 October 1958) is a British classicist and academic, specialising in classical art and archaeology. Enduring Creation: Art, Pain, and Fortitude (2001). Panorama of the Classical World (With Michael Squire) (2004)

Nigel Jonathan Spivey (born 16 October 1958) is a British classicist and academic, specialising in classical art and archaeology. He is a senior lecturer in classics at the University of Cambridge and a fellow of Emmanuel College. He has written extensively on the Etruscans and on the Olympic Games. As an undergraduate, he was a three-time champion at the Oxford-Cambridge athletics match and he remains an active member of the Achilles Club, an Oxbridge sports organization. Panorama of the Classical World (With Michael Squire) (2004). The Ancient Olympics: War minus the shooting (2004).

Items related to Enduring Creation: Art, Pain, and Fortitude. Nigel Spivey Enduring Creation: Art, Pain, and Fortitude. ISBN 13: 9780520230224.

Enduring creation: art, pain and fortitude. As Mr Spivey, a Cambridge classicist, shows in a book which consistently picks at our sores, these are also dilemmas which have long histories. Get our daily newsletter. Thames & Hudson; £2. 5. For one thing, the fear that art is compromising and even corrupting is as old as art itself. Plato wanted poets banished-they traded on (false) emotion when what citizens needed was a hard diet of reason; and in any case, was not pity effeminising?

Nigel Spivey (Cambridge University). Greek Art & Ideas (1997). Panorama of the Classical World (With Michael Squire) (2004)

Nigel Spivey (Cambridge University). jpg Nigel Jonathan Spivey (born 16 October 1958) is a British classicist and academic, specialising in classical art and archaeology.

It's hard to imagine anything better on art's birth-pangs amidst pain and suffering.

Greek Art & Ideas (1997).

Enduring Creation: Art,Pain and Fortitude. Coauthors & Alternates. Lecturer in Classics Nigel Spivey. ISBN 9780500285077 (978-0-500-28507-7) Softcover, Gardners Books, 2004.

Nigel Spivey takes on one of the greatest taboos in Western culture in this brilliantly original work of cultural history: why is so much pain depicted in the art of the West? Beginning with a meditation on Auschwitz, the prizewinning author then takes us on a journey that encompasses the stone-bound screams of classical sculpture, the many depictions of the Crucifixion, the Massacre of the Innocents and St. Sebastians pierced with arrows, self-portraits of the aging Rembrandt, and the tortured art of Vincent van Gogh. Exploring the tender, complex rapport between art and pain, Spivey guides us through the twentieth-century photographs of casualties of war, Edvard Munch's The Scream, and back to the recorded horrors of the Holocaust.Beauty and disfigurement, violence and thrill, horror and comfort—these are pairings fostered throughout Western art, for causes as various as religious martyrdom, judicial torment, artistic virtuosity, and erotic gratification. The ancient Greeks invented tragic drama: but how far was pity for tragedy's victims tempered by the notion of just deserts? The first Christians preached Christ Crucified: why then did it take some five hundred years before images appeared of Christ on the cross? The Massacre of the Innocents was an event that never happened: for what reasons were artists of the Italian Renaissance so eager to show it convincingly?Enduring Creation reveals the amazing power of art to console, to warn, to prepare the viewer for the harsher experiences of life, raising intriguing questions: Can pain be beautiful? Do we always pity suffering? Are sainthood and sadomasochism linked? This compelling study concludes with a positive message of hope for the enduring human spirit.
User reviews
Wenes
I purchased this book after reading Nigel Spivey's other book, How Art Made The World, and also watched the compelling BBC video that accompanied this. This particular book is very deep and comprehensive, involving what we all know about art, namely we depict, in picture after picture, through sculpture and beyond...not just man's triumphs but also man's deepest, anguished hours. Why do we do this? What is the connect of pain to pleasure? What drives us to create and recreate, even the deepest sorrow. For example, how many many paintings, how much art, has been created that has the crucifixion as its central and ongoing themes? The author begins this book with a meditative piece on Auschwitz and throughout, the author's commentary on art, artists, the historical context, raises important questions about pain, art, and the need to transcend and "endure". I find the book's title itself compelling because it's so about art, how we endure the slings and arrows of outrageous fate and what lasts, even, beyond us, as a legacy of pain and hope, into the future. As a reminder? Beyond a reminder?

Yes, I would recommend this book highly for its depth, its scholarship and its humanity. It's not a book one can read right through because it's dense and should, I think, should be taken slowly, chapter by chapter. Let it simmer. Let it shimmer. And then let go and come back.
Haralem
I did write an essay/review of this for the Michigan Quarterly Review; this also included an e-mail interview with Prof. Spivey.
(I am an essayist and literary critic.) Perhaps you would like to excerpt a piece of that (favorable) review for your site.