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Free eBook John Jewel and the Problem of Doctrinal Authority (Harvard Historical Monographs) download

by W. M. Southgate

Free eBook John Jewel and the Problem of Doctrinal Authority (Harvard Historical Monographs) download ISBN: 0674477502
Author: W. M. Southgate
Publisher: Harvard University Press; First Edition edition (January 1, 1962)
Language: English
Pages: 250
Category: Historical
Subcategory: World
Size MP3: 1664 mb
Size FLAC: 1206 mb
Rating: 4.8
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John Jewel and the Problem of Doctrinal Authority. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1962.

John Jewel and the Problem of Doctrinal Authority. Joseph C. McLelland (a1).

John Jewel, Bishop of Salisbury, was, after Archbishop Parker, the most important English churchman in the decisive Elizabethan era. His organizational work and voluminous doctrinal writings contributed largely to the stabilization of the Anglican Church in the early years o. . His organizational work and voluminous doctrinal writings contributed largely to the stabilization of the Anglican Church in the early years of Elizabeth's reign.

Southgate, Wyndham Mason, 1910-. Cambridge : Harvard University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;. His organizational work and voluminous doctrinal writings contributed largely t. John Jewel, Bishop of Salisbury, was, after Archbishop Parker, the most important English churchman in the decisive Elizabethan era. Among the most effective apologists in an age noted for them, an eminent humanist and patristic scholar, Bishop jewel brought the spirit of the new enlightenment to bear on the problem of authority which naturally arose after the Reformation's initial years of rupture and polemics.

By Wyndham Mason Southgate. John Jewel and the problem of doctrinal authority. Wyndham Mason Southgate.

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W M. Southgate, John Jewel and the Problem of Doctrinal Authority, Harvard Historical Monographs 49 ( Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, 1962 ), 138Google Scholar. 32. Reason is useful as an aid to understanding the revelation which is given in Scripture. This is an important point in the Lawes and is developed in a number of places. See, for example, Lawes . 4.

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John Jewel, Bishop of Salisbury, was, after Archbishop Parker, the most important English churchman in the decisive Elizabethan era. His organizational work and voluminous doctrinal writings contributed largely to the stabilization of the Anglican Church in the early years of Elizabeth's reign. Among the most effective apologists in an age noted for them, an eminent humanist and patristic scholar, Bishop jewel brought the spirit of the new enlightenment to bear on the problem of authority which naturally arose after the Reformation's initial years of rupture and polemics.

A thorough knowledge of Christian tradition and scriptural interpretation enabled Jewel to find a solution that avoided authoritarianism on the one hand and its opposite extreme of total dependence on individual inspiration on the other. The English Church of his time, strengthened by this solid basis for a continuing via media and by the brilliance of Bishop jewel's exposition of it, took cognizance of its own identity, and the Establishment emerged a reality.

A later generation of Anglican apologists, faced with the challenge of Puritanism, also leaned heavily on the theories Jewel developed. This study of his work and character thus holds a key to the understanding of several of the most important ideas and institutions to evolve during these formative periods of modern civilization.