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Free eBook God Has Ninety-Nine Names: Reporting from a Militant Middle East download

by Judith Miller

Free eBook God Has Ninety-Nine Names: Reporting from a Militant Middle East download ISBN: 0684832283
Author: Judith Miller
Publisher: A Touchstone Book; Reprint edition (May 16, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 576
Category: Historical
Subcategory: World
Size MP3: 1829 mb
Size FLAC: 1946 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: azw docx mobi txt


Judith Miller, a reporter who has covered the Middle east for twenty years, takes us inside the militant Islamic movements in ten countries: Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Algeria, Libya, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Isreal and Iran. She shows that just as there is no unified Arab world, so there is no single Islam: The movements are as different as the countries in which they are rooted.

Another drawback in this book is Miller's assumption or her targeting of an audience that is not familiar with the Middle East at all. Whatever issue she mentions, she gives loads of quick surveys as background information. This becomes boring while the information she provides seem shallow for readers familiar with the Middle East.

The author goes inside the militant Islamic movements in ten countries: Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Algeria, Libya, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Israel and Iran. She shows that just as there is no unified Arab world, so there is no single Islam. The movements are as different as the countries in which they are rooted.

God Has Ninety-Nine Names book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking God Has Ninety-Nine Names: Reporting from a Militant Middle East as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking God Has Ninety-Nine Names: Reporting from a Militant Middle East as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

He was Vincent Sheean, not Sheehan

He was Vincent Sheean, not Sheehan.

Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition

Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear. The majority of pages are undamaged with some creasing or tearing, and pencil underlining of text, but this is minimal. No highlighting of text, no writing in the margins, and no missing pages .

Miller’s book is a page-turner, utterly fascinating in its first-hand exposition of the key personalities and groups within these countries. To understand the human rights ramifications in this region, Miller’s book is a must-read. Insight into the myriad militant Islamic movements and the strategies of different governments to contain them are richly portrayed. You are not currently authenticated

use the term 'Israel'". God Has Ninety-Nine Names: Reporting from a Militant Middle East. Simon & Schuster. p. 315. ISBN 978-0-684-83228-9.

use the term 'Israel'". Middle East journalist Barbara Victor writes that when she went to Tripoli in 1986 to interview Muammar Gaddafi, it was illegal to use any term except "Zionist entity" to refer to Israel. It has been used regularly at the United Nations, by (among others) Libya, Syria, Iraq, Yemen,.

Judith Miller, a reporter who has covered the Middle east for twenty years, takes us inside the militant Islamic .

Judith Miller, a reporter who has covered the Middle east for twenty years, takes us inside the militant Islamic movements in ten countries: Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Algeria, Libya, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Isreal and Iran. Vivid and comprehensive, Miller's first-and report reveals the meaning of the tumultuous events that will continue to affect the prospects for Arab-Isreali peace and the potential for terrorism worlwide.

Adding to this debate is the recently released book, God Has Ninety-Nine Names, written by New York Times correspondent and former Cairo bureau chief Judith Miller. In this duality lies the essence of Judith Miller's book. It is an attempt, in her own words, to "convey in a historical context the mood of the countries within the region, the tone of their debates, and the forms taken by the struggle for dominance in each of them. It has received considerable praise from some, and venomous criticism from others.

A FIRST-HAND ACCOUNT OF THE STRUGGLE FOR POWER IN TODAY'S MIDDLE EAST God Has Ninety-Nine Names is a gripping, authoritative account of the epic battle between modernity and militant Islam that is is reshaping the Middle East. Judith Miller, a reporter who has covered the Middle east for twenty years, takes us inside the militant Islamic movements in ten countries: Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Algeria, Libya, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Isreal and Iran. She shows that just as there is no unified Arab world, so there is no single Islam: The movements are as different as the countries in which they are rooted. Vivid and comprehensive, Miller's first-and report reveals the meaning of the tumultuous events that will continue to affect the prospects for Arab-Isreali peace and the potential for terrorism worlwide.
User reviews
FLIDER
I recently purchased this book for my brother, who was interested in something that contains a good background on the history of militant Islam/Islamism. My own copy has been in my personal library since purchasing it in Manila the year it was first published in 1996. It still has the price tag stuck to the back cover, 795 Pesos. Rather than attempt a "scholarly review" as have others, let me just say this has been one of my favorite books on the history and politics of these ten Middle Eastern nations (each of which is the name of a chapter) and one that I have kept as a reference on this subject for almost 20 years now. I especially enjoyed it as one who has lived and worked in at least four of the ten nations which form individual chapters of the book, Iran, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and Sudan. I've often wished Ms. Miller would write a sequel including Iraq, Kuwait and Yemen. Although the book itself is now somewhat dated, the information contained within certainly forms an excellent background to what is happening in that area today.
Arakus
This book gives you a specific historical analysis of the pre-9-11 middle east that hyper focuses on each country's path toward dominate dictators and Islamic experiments in religious rule. It's also gives you an excellent, concise overview of Israel, which is in the news a lot. Yes, it's a period piece, but so we'll written and researched, you will probably be asking, does anyone in the current US government know all this? It's a 4 star only because i'd like an update, Judith.
Super P
She is a good reporter; she has done much research in the Middle East and her viewpoints are largely, very insightful. While my review is critical of her stated views and details about Islam...she is far too careless with details about Islam...the book is well worth reading if one wishes to learn about the past and present of many of the countries she covers in her book.

She completely fails when she believes she must choose between the truth and her loyalty for Israel.

Like many blind supporters of Israel, she seems to feel that creating a bias against Islam and Muslims while creating a good impression of Israel is good policy even if truth has to be sacrificed. If one can keep this in mind and carefully study what she says when discussing Islam, it is possible to learn a lot about the different Middle Eastern countries from her...even about Israel.

Miller's book covers Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Algeria, Libya, Lebanon, Syria, Israel and Iran. By and large, I found her details for each country to be very illuminating.

She lost her credibility about her knowledge of Islam right at the start when she begins with an overview of Islam by referring to the Prophet Mohammed as "the founder of the religion" on page 88. Muslims believe Islam was revealed by God to the Prophet Mohammed therefore, he was the Messenger of God through whom Islam was revealed to Humanity...GOD is the founder of the faith. On the next page she states Muslims have a duty of "Holy War or Jihad", completely overlooking the real definitions for Jihad in her promotion of bias and misinformation about Islam.

On page 91, she launches into that much-related and always wrong story about the "massacre of the Jews of Beni Qurayzah" in Medina. Her story is entirely fanciful and looks like a regurgitation of the story helpfully provided by others who also would like to create misinformation about Islam. Some of her "details" are entirely contrived; she skips over the immediate background of the Battle of the Trenches in which the entire Muslim population was in danger of being wiped off the pages of history. Miller does not relate the fact that after the siege was over the Prophet Mohamed and his followers besieged the Beni Qurayzah because that Jewish tribe had plotted an internal attack on the Muslims in Medina in coordination with the invaders. She misses the details that when the Beni Qurayzah surrendered, the Prophet Mohammed allowed the tribe to select a judge of their own choosing (they chose one who they thought was a friend) when actually, the tribe could have been annihilated without any trial and nobody would have complained. When the judge found then guilty, the Beni Qurayzah were given the punishment that was normal for the period and that was execution of all adult males. Miller also did not mention that after this event, there were still some Jewish tribes that remained in Medina and continued to coexist peacefully with the Muslims. She also did not mention the prior two times when two other Jewish tribes tried to plot the annihilation of the Muslims (Beni Nadir and Beni Qaynukah). The first tribe was allowed to leave Medina with all their belongings and they headed North towards Jerusalem. The second was allowed to leave but without their belongings and they went straight out and joined the ranks of the opposing armies... a point not lost on the Muslims who were living in daily danger to their existence.

Normally, when one notes the "massacre of the Jews of Beni Qurayzah" it would be very useful to place it in context so readers may see the event for what it was instead of a passing of judgment on Muslims and the Prophet Mohammed but I have never seen an even-handed treatment of that event; probably because it would not be helpful in the agenda to skewer Muslims.

I also find it intriguing that so many Jewish and Christian writers seem to focus on "murder" by Muslims in order to prove how bloodthirsty Islam and the Prophet Mohammed were, but completely omit the details of entire communities (in fact the whole world...Noah) being wiped out on the orders of the SAME God in the Bible. Once again, I assume objectivity would not be helpful in promoting an anti-Muslim message.

Miller also seems to try hard to pick up on points to show how backward and oppressive Islam is by selecting the strangest of details. For example, she seems to believe that the Quran states that "only a man can decide what sexual positions a woman may submit to"; the choice of words is remarkable and try as I might, I was unable to find such a reference in the Quran.

She was doing fine on her treatment of Lebanon but it appeared that the temptation to become a partisan was too great. She presents Hizbollah as a cowardly but brutal group. She says Hizbollah was fearful of Syria and therefore did things at Syria's bidding but could not explain how Hizbollah managed to oppose Israel which was a MUCH more brutal enemy. She condemned Hizbollah for many things that appeared to be too minor to note but condoned and justified killings by Israel.

In her chapter for Israel, she is clear about her bias in favor of her other country. She is not shy about labeling anti-Israeli activities as "terrorism" and "murder" but (with one exception) never comes close to recognizing the occupation, dispossession and killings of hundreds of thousands of Palestinians at Israel's hands. In her stories, Palestinians were always "killed" by Israelis while Israelis were "murdered" by Palestinians.

To her credit she does note that Palestinians fled the war of 1947-49 and were then prevented form returning by the Jews. She does state that "increasingly, historical record shows that 600,000-760,000 Palestinians were dispossessed" by the Jews.

She notes that Israeli Arabs were under Military rule until 1966 and permission to go for Haj was allowed only to a few.

Her (final) chapter on Iran was good but she could not resist blaming Iran for doing nothing to protect Iraqi Shias. She offers no suggestion as to how Iran could have protected the Shias when the US was sitting in occupation of Northern Iraq, watching every move Iran made. In fact, she makes no mention of the fact that the slaughter of the Iraqi Shias took place while the US watched without doing anything at all...after Bush Senior told the Shias to rise up against Saddam and the US would help them if they did so.

All in all, I would say the book is well worth reading if one can set aside the few (though major) biases presented against Islam.
riki
Interesting journey through the Mid-east. Very informative and then compare with todays troubles.
Yar
fantastic, great reading, a essential book to have to understand the middle east, Judith tells it like it really is
Wetiwavas
This is a very lousy book. It is a failing attempt to imitate Tom Friedman's From Beirut to Jerusalem. It is full of mistakes. Don't waste your money or your time buying it and reading it.

To illustrate what I mean by full of mistakes; take the chapter that discusses Lebanon, for instance.

The author talks about Iranians teaching children martyrdom in Shiite schools in South Lebanon. How could Persian-speaking Iranians communicate with Arabic-speaking Shiite youngsters? The author doesn't seem to be able to tell the difference.

This is not to belittle Iran's role in building Hizbullah in Lebanon, but Judith got it all with a wrong reasoning. She knows most of what happened, but she can barely explain why this did happen. When she comes up with words of wisdom, they prove to be unfit.

Another drawback in this book is Miller's assumption or her targeting of an audience that is not familiar with the Middle East at all. Whatever issue she mentions, she gives loads of quick surveys as background information. This becomes boring while the information she provides seem shallow for readers familiar with the Middle East.

Finally, even though Miller has a good journalistic style, such a style doesn't necessarily look good when writing a book that is a mixture of history and politics of a region with the biggest number of versions of the most complicated stories of the world's history.