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Free eBook Dark Valley download

by Piers Brendon

Free eBook Dark Valley download ISBN: 0712667148
Author: Piers Brendon
Publisher: Gardners Books (February 28, 2001)
Language: English
Category: Historical
Subcategory: World
Size MP3: 1152 mb
Size FLAC: 1748 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: rtf azw mbr lrf


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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Piers Brendon's magisterial overview of the 1930s is the story of the dark, dishonest decade - child of one world war and parent of the next - that determined the course of the twentieth century.

Piers Brendon's magisterial overview of the 1930s is the story of the dark, dishonest decade - child of one world war and parent of the next - that determined the course of the twentieth century. Dealing individually with each of the period's great powers - the USA, Germany, Italy, France, Britain, Japan, Spain and Russia - Brendon takes us through the ten years dominated by the Great Depression and political turmoil.

Piers Brendon FRSL (born 21 December 1940) is a British writer, known for historical and biographical works. The Dark Valley: A Panorama of the 1930s (2000; ISBN 0-375-70808-1). He was educated at Shrewsbury School and Magdalene College, Cambridge, where he read history. From 1979 onwards he has worked as a freelance writer of books, journalism and for television. From 1995 he has been a fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge and was keeper of the Churchill Archives Centre from 1995 to 2001, taking over from Correlli Barnett  . The Windsors - A Dynasty Revealed 1917–2000, with Phillip Whitehead (2000

Piers Brendon is the author of more than a dozen books, including biographies of Churchill and Eisenhower, the best-selling Eminent Edwardians, the highly-acclaimed The Decline and Fall of the British Empire and, most recently, Eminent Elizabethans.

Piers Brendon is the author of more than a dozen books, including biographies of Churchill and Eisenhower, the best-selling Eminent Edwardians, the highly-acclaimed The Decline and Fall of the British Empire and, most recently, Eminent Elizabethans. He also writes for television and contributes frequently to the national press.

The Dark Valley Brendon, Piers Random House (USA) 9780375708084 : The 1930s were perhaps the seminal decade in twentieth-century history, a dark time of global . The Dark Valley, Brendon, Piers. Варианты приобретения. Кол-во: о цене Наличие: Отсутствует.

The Dark Valley Brendon, Piers Random House (USA) 9780375708084 : The 1930s were perhaps the seminal decade in twentieth-century history, a dark time of global depression that displaced millio. Возможна поставка под заказ. При оформлении заказа до: 6 сен 2019 Ориентировочная дата поставки: начало октября При условии наличия книги у поставщика.

Электронная книга "The Dark Valley: A Panorama of the 1930s", Piers Brendon. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Dark Valley: A Panorama of the 1930s" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The Dark Valley book.

Piers Brendon is the author of The Dark Valley, among other histories and biographies. He is the former Keeper of the Churchill Archives Centre and a Fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge. He lives in Cambridge, England. Category: World History Politics. People Who Read The Dark Valley Also Read.

Piers Brendon's massive work, The Dark Valley: A Panorama of the 1930's, is an addictive historical treat

Piers Brendon's massive work, The Dark Valley: A Panorama of the 1930's, is an addictive historical treat. He concentrates on the countries of England, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Russia, Japan and American as they hurtle towards a war that seems all but inevitable, driven on by the Depression and the growth of militaristic and totalitarian states. The reader will also hurtle through this massive book along with the decade covered on the roller coaster ride the author provides

Piers Brendon's magisterial overview of the 1930s is the story of the dark, dishonest decade - child of one world war and parent of the next - that determined the course of the twentieth century.

Piers Brendon's magisterial overview of the 1930s is the story of the dark, dishonest decade - child of one world war and parent of the next - that determined the course of the twentieth century. Dealing individually with each of the period's great powers - the USA, Germany, Italy, France, Britain, Japan, Spain and Russia - Brendon takes us through the ten years dominated by the Great Depression and political turmoil. When Broadway, Piccadilly Circus, the Kurfurstendamm and the Ginza - neon metaphors of hope after four years of carnage - grew dim as the giants of unemployment, hardship, strife and fear took their hold. From the concentration camps of Dachau and Kolyma, the Ukraine famine and the American Dust Bowl, to the Moscow metro, the Empire State Building and the Paris Exposition, The Dark Valley brings the 1930's back to life through meticulous scholarship. Brendon examines the great leaders - Hitler, Stalin, Mussolini, Mao Tse-Tung, Haile Selassie and countless others - not with hindsight but in the context of their age; but also, through a vivid chronicling of contemporary experience, he gives us a sense of what it was to be living then.
User reviews
Enditaling
an extraordinarily broad view of the period between world wars, and the factors and players that led to World War II, economic, political, the fascinating personalities and more. since i have not read much about this period, i found it quite illuminating. other reviewers have pointed out that it is not comprehensive and somewhat idiosyncratic, but still a fine introduction to this period, despite the frequent and unnecessary challenges to my vocabulary. one advantage of reading on a kindle is that you can just poke a word to get a definition.
Adaly
A well written and insightful book. The author breaks the story into geographies and talks about what was happening in each at the same time of the century, which is very interesting, since many I am sure don't fully appreciate the global nature of the global events of the time.
Qudanilyr
The softcover version of "The Dark Valley" has 692 pages of text. That sounds like a lot, unless as one reads them, as I did, he finds himself repeatedly asking, "Why does this book have to end?"

Fairly early on, Author Brendon observes, "Cutting up the past and labeling the snippets is one way of trying to impose order on the flux of history. Doubtless it is always unsatisfactory - ages merge, epithets mislead." Of course, he then proceeds to demonstrate that while his assessment might be true for most historians, it certainly is not for him. Think of the `snippets' as fine but unformed threads and of Brendon as a master weaver; the result is a tapestry that takes a reader's breath away. Simply superb.

The presence of so many thoughtful and incisive reviews requires that I add my own two cents in the form of a cavil: both Brendon here and Timothy Snyder in "Bloodlands" refer to the Russian pistol which was used to such stunning effect in ridding Stalin of his enemies as the "Nagan." It is, rather, the "Nagant," ending with a `t.' Big deal, eh? At least it shows I'm a careful reader (and, not surprisingly, that neither the Cambridge nor Yale libraries stock copies of "Firearms of the World").

I am both a careful, and an unfulfilled, reader. Brendon can't do much about it now; his work is done. But I sure would have enjoyed another couple hundred pages of this marvelous piece of History writing. I have read so many books that I thought were wonderful that I'm always hesitant to call this or that `one of the best.' I have no such hesitation here: at or near the very top of the list. If you haven't read it, give yourself a treat. Just be warned about `wanting more.'
Kazigrel
This is a wonderfully executed study of the many ways in which the social, economic, and political events of the Depression era fostered the world's disastrous descent into the horrors of what became World War Two. Famed British historian Piers Brendon does great credit to this complex and widely varying terrain in his exhaustive and thoughtful coverage of the whole panorama of human suffering and social folly that was the 1930s. As he aptly points out early on in the book, the nations of the world shared much more in the way of common problems and perceived dangers than they recognized, and all too often their individual efforts to extricate themselves meant friction and conflict with their neighbors or/and competitors. Lacking any real appreciation for the ways in which their efforts to rearm themselves in order to demand more of the world's "largesse" for themselves would ultimately doom them all to a war far worse than the horrors so recently visited in World War One, they ambled recklessly toward the cliff of the abyss with no real appreciation for the crushing fall they are about to take.
In this sense Brandon reemphasizes one of the oldest lessons of history; that we need to more fully comprehend the past and what it was like to properly understand the present. In this way, the events of the late 1920s and early 1930s doomed the various nations into a scenario from which all the most likely scenarios ended in international conflict. Of course, the fact that the conflict that eventuates from these internal machinations reached a level of intensity never before witnessed in the modern world hardly occurred to most of the protagonists. Indeed, all of this ground has been covered brilliantly before, and Brendon's considerable contribution in this book lay not in this description, but rather in the painstaking way he so carefully describes the social, economic, and political particulars in each individual nation, and then weaves these accumulated and collated observations into a masterful tale that often is so well-written it seems more like fiction than fact.
The reader is quickly ensnared by his wonderful powers of exposition, and the endless collage of names, places, and events spin by in spell-binding fashion as he masterfully describes a virtual panorama of places, a wide cast of characters, and an era full of fateful events. This was a decade in so many ways spinning ineluctably out of control in terms of the social and economic forces unleashed that may seem hard from our own perspective to understand how it was that no one could either stop it or blunt its impact. Yet it was the very nature of the cultural despair and the dangerous search for political and cultural scapegoats, whether in Berlin, Tokyo, or Moscow, that lent an air of irresistible momentum to the process. Thus, whether referring to Hitler's early popularity based on a program to employ the masses of unemployed Germans, or Stalin's deliberate victimization of millions of Ukrainians, or the unbridled Japanese militarism evidenced in places like Manchuria and China, in each case the popular support and political overtones were cloaked in attempts to gain national resurgence over the absolutely devastating effects of both the terms of the political settlement of the First World War and the Great Depression.
In this sense, this book offers fresh proof of the ways in which the events of the past frame and channel the possibilities for the present and the future. Reading this book leaves little doubt in this reader's mind regarding the lessons history has to teach us all. This is one reason we Americans should be especially aggrieved by the ways in which public school education has slighted the conventional teaching of history in favor of cross-cultural studies. While I am empathetic to the reasons for this change in teaching philosophy, I am even more convinced that so doing represents a critical mistake that leaves our youngsters ignorant of the past, and thus more vulnerable to its painful lessons. As George Santayana said, "those who do not learn from the lessons of history are condemned to repeat them". This is an important and valuable book, and is one I highly recommend. Enjoy!
Adorardana
Detailed and well written, engaging account of the 1930's, a depressing and anxiety filled time in Europe. Great Depression, Nazi Germany, Stalin, mussolini, Japan...
Mmsa
The Dark Valley creates neat chapters out of many of the questions that I had about some of the connective fibers that linked WWI and WWII...interestingly, it affirmed how economics is as powerful a force as politics and religion in feeding enduring conflict.