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by Nikita Khrushchev,Strobe Talbott,Edward Crankshaw,Jerrold Schecter

Free eBook Khrushchev Remembers: The Last Testament (Illustrated) download ISBN: 0316831417
Author: Nikita Khrushchev,Strobe Talbott,Edward Crankshaw,Jerrold Schecter
Publisher: Little Brown and Company; 1st edition (June 1974)
Language: English
Pages: 602
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Russia
Size MP3: 1735 mb
Size FLAC: 1210 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: mobi lrf txt doc


This volume, together with it sequel, is essential reading for a balanced view of recent history.

This volume, together with it sequel, is essential reading for a balanced view of recent history. As would be expected, a number of issues, which had at-that-time possible repercussions.

Doing that is against . and international laws

Doing that is against . and international laws. This item is a book6 ½ by 9 1/2" 602 page hardcover with dustjacket copy

Foreword by Edward Crankshaw. Introduction by Jerrold L. Schecter. Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service. Khrushchev Remembers: The Last Testament. By Nikita S. Khrushchev.

Foreword by Edward Crankshaw. Boston and Toronto: Little, Brown and Company, 1974. Foreword by Edward Crankshaw.

Khrushchev, Nikita Sergeevich, 1894-1971. New York, Bantam Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Andy Wilcoxon on May 18, 2010.

Edward Crankshaw (Introduction). Jerrold Schecter (Introduction). Strobe Talbott (Translator). Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

Items related to Khrushchev Remembers: The Last Testament . Indeed, the book outweighs tons of revisionist historical tracts in its lively demonstration of the unbroken tradition of defensive postures.

Items related to Khrushchev Remembers: The Last Testament (Illustrated). Nikita Khrushchev Khrushchev Remembers: The Last Testament (Illustrated). ISBN 13: 9780316831413. Khrushchev Remembers: The Last Testament (Illustrated). The second volume of Khrushchev's memoirs bears all the voiceprints of a lovable dodo. The ex-Premier, musing in retirement, blusters about Stalin's mistakes - for example, the postwar drive to build up, of all things, a conventional navy. Indeed, the book outweighs tons of revisionist historical tracts in its lively demonstration of the unbroken tradition of defensive postures by the Soviets.

Khrushchev himself had authorized the deletions, for apparent political reasons. Strobe Talbott was the architect of the Clinton administrations policy toward Russia and the other states of the former Soviet Union. He served as deputy secretary of state for seven years. Two decades would pass before those gaps could be filled.

Khrushchev had some real flaws (the man not the book). Khrushchev Remembers: The Last Testament (Illustrated) Hardcover. One of the best reads I've had in a long time. It gave me great insight into a particular time and place.

Khrushchev, N. S. Khrushchev Remembers. Khrushchev: a biography. London: Collins, 1966. 316 p. Edward Crankshaw. Vol 2, The Last Testament. Mc. Neal, R. H. The Bolshevik Tradition: Lenin, Stalin, Khrushchev. London: André Deutsch, Little, Brown, 1974. Harmondsworth, England: Penguin, 1959. 175 p. (Penguin Special).

The second volume of Khrushchev's memoirs bears all the voiceprints of a lovable dodo. The ex-Premier, musing in retirement, blusters about Stalin's mistakes -- for example, the postwar drive to build up, of all things, a conventional navy. And at the same time he shares Stalin's humble reflex of gratification when any capitalist spokesman (de Gaulle called me mon ami!) acts civil. Indeed, the book outweighs tons of revisionist historical tracts in its lively demonstration of the unbroken tradition of defensive postures by the Soviets. Of course there is also an obbligato of self-justification, both national (China's irrationality) and personal (Khrushchev disapproved of sending troops into Poland). On the Cuban missile crisis, the Vienna meeting with JFK, etc. Khrushchev's recollections amplify the impression of gratitude for small things won or not lost. Khrushchev meets the U.S. brewery workers' head and "When he reached for another glass of beer I noticed he had gold wrist watches on both his left and right arms. What did he think they were, decorations? Bracelets?" His scorn is equaled only by his enthusiasm for such bourgeois rulers as Nehru and General Ne Win of Burma. Echt Khrushchevisms persist as he rumbles and bumbles on the subject of agriculture. Some reviewers wondered whether the memoirs are a fabrication. If so, this volume represents a slick job by someone with an excellent psychological profile of the man; both Khrushchev's true simple-mindedness and his shrewd-simple Ukrainian persona come through in a fashion as memorable as these grave years.
User reviews
Raelin
Assuming this is authentic, and the author does take time to address reasons why it is, this is a fantastic book. It gives a very up front and personal look into the inner workings of one of the biggest experiments in human history. I had always remembered Krushchev as a big brutish thug threatening to "Bury" us, and also being Kennedy's adversary in the Cuban Missile Crisis. In this book however, far from being brutish Krushchev's voice is human, easily accessible, surprisingly witty and full of many personal anecdotes. Now of course, this must be taken with a grain of salt. By his account, good old Comrade Krushchev never participated in any purge and was completely oblivious to the suffering in the Ukraine (even while he was running it). And of course he was a big hero in the great Patriotic War. But even with all of its embellishments and factual omissions, this is a thoroughly entertaining read..You do come away with a sense of the personality of the man.
Carrot
Khrushchev had some real flaws (the man not the book). One of the best reads I've had in a long time. It gave me great insight into a particular time and place. Great insight into a man who deserves better American press. Had Kennedy lived, the two of them could have changed the course of history.
Vojar
This volume, together with it sequel [Khrushchev Remembers: the Last Testament], is essential reading for a balanced view of recent history. As would be expected, a number of issues, which had at-that-time possible repercussions. were understandably elided, but I tend to trust Khrushchev's commentary more than I would most American sources. Elisions, yes: lies, no.
Gabar
Mr. Khrushchev writes with great sincerity that can be clearly felt and understood that it is personal life experience that is being remembered in open and honest detail prior to WWII until the Cuban Missile crisis.
The events prior to and during WWII are Mr. Khrushchev s personal observations from his position in the Command Hierarchy of Stalin s Political Commissars, and how this organization and personalities including Stalin conducted themselves. This provides insight into the Command Function under Stalin that placed great strain on Political Commissars and Military Commanders, that Mr. Khrushchev experienced firsthand.
Military Operations are outlined but not in any great detail.
Downloaded
"The Last Testament" is the second of what turned out to be three books dishing out the (probably authentic, almost certainly) memoirs of Nikita Khruschev. They were released in dribs and drabs. The first volume, published a couple years earlier than this volume, is by far, the most seriously edited with the best footnotes. But it is also the most heavily filtered - it was a product of its times, and the people who transmitted the tapes to the West for publication were still at risk and needed to be protected. This second volume is a bit more frank, and includes a bit more of Khruschev's personality, opens a real window into his thinking but yet some statements from him (and omissions of things that should obviously have been addressed) that were probably aimed at underrocking the boat, also to protect family and those close to him. By far, the most fun, and probably historically honest, the one that reveals the most of Khruschev's character and personality, is the third release, the "Gladnost Tapes" book. It's short - only 200 pages - but there he is, swearing, talking graphically in a way that he, himself describes as "crude", and displaying his attitudes towards Mao (K thought he was a meglomaniac), Ho Chi Minh ) whom he truly respected, and Fidel Castro, whom he though was a bit rabid and out of control, especially because of his youth. Not many nice things to say about Richard Nixon, a "reactionary" in K's opinion, though he was genuinely sorry to have missed Nixon when he paid a visit to K's Moscow apartment while K was away gardening at this Dacha in the suburbs. Any serious student of the Cold War needs to read all three - and each book is important, in fact vital, in its own way. But you won't get the full picture until you've read all three. Though all of them are valuable and unique windows into his personality and reveal the way decisions were actually made in the Kremlin during the Cold War, this volume, the Last Testament, and the final volume, the Gladnost Tapes are actually fun to read in a way that the first volume lacks. And for sure, that's because more of K's personality, both flaws and virtues, warts and all, comes through with what seems like a genuinely authentic view of this very interesting man. (I am no communist - the opposite, a veteran Cold Warrior - but I felt compelled to read these books after a recent visit to Moscow, during which I visited Khruschev's grave. That experience awakened questions from my youth about Khruschev. Honestly, these books answered all of them, and told me a great deal more. Who would have imagined that he had a first wife who died of starvation during a famine, during the Russian Civil War in 1921? How personally he took it when he was denied a visit to Disneyland? It's all here in these books.
Bolanim
A VERY INTERESTING, "ARRESTING" REVELATION OF RUSSIAN THINKING. SO DIFFERENT AND HONESTLY "SPOKEN" by KHRUSHEV HIMSELF. THIS BOOK IS A GREAT HISTORY LESSON AND AN HONEST PORTRAYAL OF ORIENTAL THINKING.
ndup
Excellent. Translation a tad difficult but not impossible. The Nikita S Khrushchev I remember. Great photos.
Interesting insight into an exciting period in history and the inner workings of the Kremlin.