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Free eBook Alexander I: Tsar of war and peace download

by Alan Warwick Palmer

Free eBook Alexander I: Tsar of war and peace download ISBN: 0297767003
Author: Alan Warwick Palmer
Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson; 1st Edition edition (1974)
Language: English
Pages: 487
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Russia
Size MP3: 1733 mb
Size FLAC: 1919 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: lit lrf azw txt


Palmer, Alan Warwick. Alexander I, Emperor of Russia, 1777-1825. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Palmer, Alan Warwick. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on August 28, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Alexander refuses to make Peace. Chapter 15 tsar with a mission

Alexander refuses to make Peace. Chapter 15 tsar with a mission. Vilna Again (December 1812–January 1813). The Liberation of Prussia. The Changing Fortunes of War (Spring 1813). Diplomatic Interlude (June–August 1813). The Battles of Dresden and Leipzig and the Race for Frankfurt. Alexander I, ruler of Russia for the first quarter of the nineteenth century, is remembered today mainly on three counts: as the Tsar who refused to make peace with the French when Moscow fell in 1812; as the idealist who sought to bind Europe’s sovereigns in a Holy Alliance in 1815; and as the Emperor who died – or gave the impression of.

As Alan Palmer himself writes in his preface, 'Alexander 1, ruler of Russia for the first quarter of the nineteenth century, is remembered today mainly on three counts: as the Tsar who refused to make peace with the French when Moscow fell in 1812; as the idealist who sought to bind Europe's.

As Alan Palmer himself writes in his preface, 'Alexander 1, ruler of Russia for the first quarter of the nineteenth century, is remembered today mainly on three counts: as the Tsar who refused to make peace with the French when Moscow fell in 1812; as the idealist who sought to bind Europe's sovereigns in a Holy Alliance in 1815; and as the. Emperor who died - or gave the impression of having died - at the remote southern seaport of Taganrog in the winter of 1825

Alan Warwick Palmer (born 1926) is a British author of historical and biographical books. Palmer was educated at Bancroft's School, Woodford Green, London, and Oriel College, Oxford.

Alan Warwick Palmer (born 1926) is a British author of historical and biographical books. His late wife, Veronica Palmer collaborated on several of his books. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 1980.

As Alan Palmer himself writes in his preface, 'Alexander 1, ruler of Russia for the first quarter of the . Actually, Tsar Alexander I of Russia was second in world renown only to his infamous nemesis during this period of history. Alexander I ruled as Russia's Emperor from 1801-1825

As Alan Palmer himself writes in his preface, 'Alexander 1, ruler of Russia for the first quarter of the nineteenth century, is remembered today mainly on three. Alexander I ruled as Russia's Emperor from 1801-1825. Make no mistake about it, Alexander was an autocrat but not a very despotic one. He always asserted that he wanted to end serfdom but could never deal with the politics of this national shame.

Электронная книга "Alexander I: Tsar of War and Peace", Alan Palmer

Электронная книга "Alexander I: Tsar of War and Peace", Alan Palmer. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Alexander I: Tsar of War and Peace" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

He is the author of more than three dozen works: narrative histories; biographies; historical dictionaries ir reference books. His main interests are in the Napoleonic era, nineteenth century diplomacy, the First World War and Eastern Europe, although his Northern Shores is a history of the Baltic Sea and its peoples from earliest times to 2004.

and Peace download pdf myebookpdf He has been dubbed The Enigmatic Tsar. There are many contrasting opinions of him.

Alexander I: Tsar of War and Peace download pdf myebookpdf. com/?book 0571259626 As Alan Palmer himself writes in his preface, Alexander 1, ruler of Russia for the first quarter of the nineteenth century, is remembered today mainly on three counts: as the Tsar who refused to make peace with the French when Moscow fell in 1812; as the idealist who sought to. bind Europe s sovereigns in a Holy Alliance in 1815; and as the Emperor who died - or gave the impression of having died - at the remote southern seaport of Taganrog in the winter of 1825. He has been dubbed The Enigmatic Tsar.

Alexander I, 1801-1825. There's no description for this book yet.

Alexander I: Tsar of war and peace. Are you sure you want to remove Alexander I: Tsar of war and peace from your list? Alexander I: Tsar of war and peace. by Alan Warwick Palmer. Published 1974 by Harper & Row in New York. History, Alexander I, Emperor of Russia, 1777-1825. Alexander I Emperor of Russia (1777-1825). Alexander I, 1801-1825.

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Alexander I: Tsar of War and Peace
User reviews
inetserfer
I'm not sure whether this softcover edition is a "revised" version or just a reprint of the 1974 hardcover -- so until someone comes forward with this information, I thought my "hardcover edition" review might be helpful.

Author Alan W. Palmer could hardly have chosen a more interesting personality to write about than "Alexander the Blessed," as he was known among his people after having defeated Napoleon Bonaparte. Actually, Tsar Alexander I of Russia was second in world renown only to his infamous nemesis during this period of history. Alexander I ruled as Russia's Emperor from 1801-1825.

Make no mistake about it, Alexander was an autocrat but not a very despotic one. He always asserted that he wanted to end serfdom but could never deal with the politics of this national shame. Both his life and his political career are well-documented here by Palmer and it seems to have transpired in two distinct phases: his reformer period and his [religiously] "mystical" period, the latter being a time when his people saw little of him publicly and when he seems to have recanted on initiating reform.

Of course, Alexander's big achievement was to defeat Napoleon when the latter invaded the Russian homeland in 1812 and drove his massive army all the way to Moscow. We know the story: Napoleon rested for a few weeks there in a deserted and fire-scorched Moscow; Alexander (in St. Petersburg) refused all communication with him; Napoleon ultimately panicked, began to pursue the Russian Army to the southwest, then changed his mind and retreated to France, post-haste and leaving his troop caravans behind to fend for themselves during one of the worst Russian winters on record. Napoleon lost about a half-million men during the escapade.

Alexander then pushed on to Paris and eventually saw Napoleon exiled to Elba. Napoleon escaped his island captivity a short time later and briefly ruled again but the Englishman, Wellington, ended that futile campaign and Bonaparte was again sent into isolation and exile.

All these facts can be garnered from a good many books including Tolstoy's fictional War and Peace. But Palmer has done as good a job as anyone in keeping it all straight, sifting through Russian cultural proclivities, and presenting it to us in Anglicized form. The more remarkable tale about Alexander, though, is his supposed death. At the time when this book was first published, Palmer subscribed to the view that Alexander did, in fact, die in southern Russia (Taganrog) in 1825.

Legends were generated from spotty hearsay at the time which subsequently reeked of little more than rumors that Alexander had faked his death and ultimately became the Russian mystic ("starets") Feodor Kuzmich, a hermitic monk who resided peacefully in Siberia until his death many years later. Since 1991 many closed books have opened in Russia (chiefly due to the fall of the Soviet Union) and credible cases have now been made that Tsar Alexander I did in actuality re-emerge in Siberia as Feodor Kuzmich. Neither the Romanov family (the family of the Tsars) nor the Bolsheviks (Communists) who usurped them (after Kerensky) were big on revealing information of this sort - so when the Soviet Union fell, Russia suddenly became a frenzied feeding ground for historians as much as it did for capitalists. Here is a terrific recent book on the topic of Alexander's death, (I have lately read and reviewed it): Imperial Legend : The Disappearance of Czar Alexander I.

Palmer's book is fairly straightforward and he includes most of the significant tabloid dirt which sticks to Alexander (which includes his extra-marital love affairs) but he doesn't sensationalize it in any way. Alexander had more-or-less endorsed the justified slaying of his demented father, Tsar Paul I, and the author does a fair job of documenting the intrigues which led to that remarkable event, (and one which caused Alexander much grief to his dying day.)

This work is also nicely illustrated with relevant and helpful black-and-white photographs throughout the 487-page book and additionally includes a rarely seen map of the 1805 Austerlitz campaign. Palmer has also incorporated a simplified genealogy of the Romanov Dynasty within the final pages, albeit there's a slight mistake on it regarding the four daughters of Nicholas II (Palmer notes only two.) I was especially interested in the very personal textual excerpts which the author included of John Quincy Adams who served in Russia at the time of Alexander I as American Minister. In his bibliography Palmer cites about eight full pages of sources which support his research work.

If you can lay hands on a hardcover copy of this well-written book for a cheap price, it's certainly worth reading. But be aware that there are very likely a number more recent (post Soviet) and authoritative books about this remarkable Russian Tsar now available.
Delaath
It is quite a mystery how the Romanov dynasty lasted 300 years, given the intrigue and mayhem that attended the death of one tsar and the coming to the throne of All the Russias of the next. At first glance, Alan Palmer's 400 page doorstopper looks formidable, but it is a fascinating read. Alexander was well-schooled by his grandmother Catherine the Great who doted on him (and in an interesting minor aside may well be the inventor of the all in one babysuit in which she insisted he be dressed in his infancy). He came to the throne in typical Romanov fashion after a palace coup in which his wishes that his father be deposed without injury were ignored. Surrounded all his life by powerful and bullying woman (especially his mother and sister), he never really knew his own mind - half reformer and half autocrat, he ended up satisfying no one and almost abandoned his crown before dieing in mysterious circumstances. His legacy as the heroic conqueror of Napoleon endures and he cut a dashing figure in all the palaces of Europe, even sweeping the high priestess of fashion, the former Empress Josephine off her feet with his gallantry and charm. Palmer's account of this complex tsar makes a great read and adds an interesting Russian dimension to one's understanding of the turbulent decades of the early 19th century.
Magis
Author Alan W. Palmer could hardly have chosen a more interesting personality to write about than "Alexander the Blessed," as he was known among his people after having defeated Napoleon Bonaparte. Actually, Tsar Alexander I of Russia was second in world renown only to his infamous nemesis during this period of history. Alexander I ruled as Russia's Emperor from 1801-1825.

Make no mistake about it, Alexander was an autocrat but not a very despotic one. He always asserted that he wanted to end serfdom but could never deal with the politics of this national shame. Both his life and his political career are well-documented here by Palmer and it seems to have transpired in two distinct phases: his reformer period and his [religiously] "mystical" period, the latter being a time when his people saw little of him publicly and when he seems to have recanted on initiating reform.

Of course, Alexander's big achievement was to defeat Napoleon when the latter invaded the Russian homeland in 1812 and drove his massive army all the way to Moscow. We know the story: Napoleon rested for a few weeks there in a deserted and fire-scorched Moscow; Alexander (in St. Petersburg) refused all communication with him; Napoleon ultimately panicked, began to pursue the Russian Army to the southwest, then changed his mind and retreated to France, post-haste and leaving his troop caravans behind to fend for themselves during one of the worst Russian winters on record. Napoleon lost about a half-million men during the escapade.

Alexander then pushed on to Paris and eventually saw Napoleon exiled to Elba. Napoleon escaped his island captivity a short time later and briefly ruled again but the Englishman, Wellington, ended that futile campaign and Bonaparte was again sent into isolation and exile.

All these facts can be garnered from a good many books including Tolstoy's fictional War and Peace. But Palmer has done as good a job as anyone in keeping it all straight, sifting through Russian cultural proclivities, and presenting it to us in Anglicized form. The more remarkable tale about Alexander, though, is his supposed death. At the time when this book was first published, Palmer subscribed to the view that Alexander did, in fact, die in southern Russia (Taganrog) in 1825.

Legends were generated from spotty hearsay at the time which subsequently reeked of little more than rumors that Alexander had faked his death and ultimately became the Russian mystic ("starets") Feodor Kuzmich, a hermitic monk who resided peacefully in Siberia until his death many years later. Since 1974 many closed books have opened in Russia (chiefly due to the fall of the Soviet Union) and credible cases have now been made that Tsar Alexander I did in actuality re-emerge in Siberia as Feodor Kuzmich. Neither the Romanov family (the family of the Tsars) nor the Bolsheviks (Communists) who usurped them (after Kerensky) were big on revealing information of this sort - so when the Soviet Union fell, Russia suddenly became a frenzied feeding ground for historians as much as it did for capitalists. Here is a terrific recent book on the topic of Alexander's death, (I have lately read and reviewed it): Imperial Legend : The Disappearance of Czar Alexander I.

Palmer's book is fairly straightforward and he includes most of the significant tabloid dirt which sticks to Alexander (which includes his extra-marital love affairs) but he doesn't sensationalize it in any way. Alexander had more-or-less endorsed the justified slaying of his demented father, Tsar Paul I, and the author does a fair job of documenting the intrigues which led to that remarkable event, (and one which caused Alexander much grief to his dying day.)

This work is also nicely illustrated with relevant and helpful black-and-white photographs throughout the 487-page book and additionally includes a rarely seen map of the 1805 Austerlitz campaign. Palmer has also incorporated a simplified genealogy of the Romanov Dynasty within the final pages, albeit there's a slight mistake on it regarding the four daughters of Nicholas II (Palmer notes only two.) I was especially interested in the very personal textual excerpts which the author included of John Quincy Adams who served in Russia at the time of Alexander I as American Minister. In his bibliography Palmer cites about eight full pages of sources which support his research work.

If you can lay hands on a hardcover copy of this well-written book for a cheap price, it's certainly worth reading. But be aware that there are very likely a number more recent (post Soviet) and authoritative books about this remarkable Russian Tsar now available.