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Free eBook Storming the Heavens: Soldiers, Emperors, and Civilians in the Roman Empire download

by Antonio Santosuosso

Free eBook Storming the Heavens: Soldiers, Emperors, and Civilians in the Roman Empire download ISBN: 081333523X
Author: Antonio Santosuosso
Publisher: Westview Press; 1 edition (August 15, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 288
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Military
Size MP3: 1830 mb
Size FLAC: 1136 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: lrf lit mbr lrf


Storming the Heavens looks at this dramatic history from a variety of angles. What changed most radically, Santosuosso argues, was the behavior of soldiers in the Roman armies.

Storming the Heavens looks at this dramatic history from a variety of angles. The troops became the enemies within, their pillage and slaughter of fellow citizens indiscriminate, their loyalty not to the Republic but to their leaders, as long as they were ample providers of booty. By opening the military ranks to all, the new army abandoned its role as depository of the values of the upper classes and the propertied.

As historian Antonio Santosuosso shows, armies at the edges of the empire instead gave their allegiance to their . I seem to discover books well after they are published. I have long been interested in the Romans, and this is an interesting take on the role of the Roman armies.

Naturally enough, this made Roman politics an unstable affair, and in fact throughout the third century . an emperor was likely to have come to power through a coup d'état, and to end his days as the victim of assassination.

What changed most radically, Santosuosso argues, was the behavior of soldiers in the Roman armies.

the ancient world watched as the Roman armies maintained clear superiority over all they surveyed. DOI: 1. 324/9780429497100. Cite this publication.

By Antonio Santosuosso. Storming the Heavens looks at this dramatic history from a variety of angles.

Storming The Heavens book. What changed most radically, Santosuosso argues, was the behavior of soldiers in the Roman armies

Storming The Heavens book. Instead, it became an institution of the poor and drain on the power of the Empire.

Antonio Santosuosso (1936-12 July 2014) was a Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Western Ontario in London . Storming the Heavens: Soldiers, Emperors, and Civilians in the Roman Empire (2001), ISBN 0-8133-3523-X.

Antonio Santosuosso (1936-12 July 2014) was a Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario. Assessment of the Battle of Tours. Barbarians, Marauders, and Infidels: The Ways of Medieval Warfare (2004), ISBN 0-8133-9153-9. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780712698863.

Keywords: emperors, soldiers, Storming the Heavens, civilians, Roman Empire, Antonio Santosuosso.

Author:Santosuosso, Antonio. Book Binding:Paperback. We appreciate the impact a good book can have. Storming The Heavens: Soldiers, Emperors and Civilians in the Roman Empire. We all like the idea of saving a bit of cash, so when we found out how many good quality used books are out there - we just had to let you know! Read full description. Antonio Santosuosso is professor of history at the University of Western Ontario and author of Soldiers, Citizens, and the Symbols of War: From Classical Greece to Republican Rome, 500-167 BC and Barbarians, Marauders and Infidels: The Ways of Medieval Warfare. He lives in London, Ontario. Country of Publication.

The story of the Roman military machine begins with the crisis that enveloped Rome in the late second century B.C., when soldiers became the Empire's worst enemy, pillaging citizens and creating social turmoil.In the closing years of the second century B.C., the ancient world watched as the Roman armies maintained clear superiority over all they surveyed. But, Rome also faced an internal situation that endangered the supremacy across the expanse of the Empire. Social turmoil prevailed at the heart of her territories, led by an increasing number of dispossessed farmers, too little manpower for the army, and an inevitable conflict with the allies who had fought side by side with the Romans to establish Roman dominion. Storming the Heavens looks at this dramatic history from a variety of angles. What changed most radically, Santosuosso argues, was the behavior of soldiers in the Roman armies. The troops became the enemies within, their pillage and slaughter of fellow citizens indiscriminate, their loyalty not to the Republic but to their leaders, as long as they were ample providers of booty. By opening the military ranks to all, the new army abandoned its role as depository of the values of the upper classes and the propertied. Instead, it became an institution of the poor and drain on the power of the Empire. Santosuosso also investigates other topics, such as the monopoly of military power in the hands of a few, the connection between the armed forces and the cherished values of the state, the manipulation of the lower classes so that they would accept the view of life, control, and power dictated by the oligarchy, and the subjugation and dehumanization of subject peoples, whether they be Gauls, Britons, Germans, Africans, or even the Romans themselves.
User reviews
Shezokha
I seem to discover books well after they are published. I have long been interested in the Romans, and this is an interesting take on the role of the Roman armies. It is not a military history, but what I would describe as a combination of sociology and military history applied to this ancient context. It's a history of how the army went from the embodiment of Roman virtue to controlling the state. It chronicles what the author sees as the decay of the army in the sense it increasingly existed to maintain its own status, corrupting the Empire's institutions and creating a state based on force and raw exploitation. Essentially, Santosuosso sees the army as destroying the potential of the Empire.

I found this to be a thought-provoking read. This book is not so easy to describe, so browse it thoroughly before reading it through. It got this reader, at least, wondering if the Romans could have done better and lasted longer. Suppose Rome could have lasted until the 800s, how would that have changed history?
Ballardana
This is a good book to read for a perspective on Roman history that emphasises the role played in that grand drama by Rome's legions. The author discusses the changing political, social and economic effects of how the legions were recruited, commanded and paid, as well as providing significant detail on the structure, command and performance of the legions over time. The effects of the military reforms of Marius, Julius Caesar, Octavian, as well as Septimius Severus and Diocletian are given special attention as are their different offensive and defensive strategies.
The author weaves historical information and his own insights into a well written story that moves along easily over the long time period covered. His discussion of specific battles (e.g. Adrianopole) and brief character studies (e.g. Marius) add personal detail and improve the general story. The book is both educational and entertaining and strongly recommended.