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Free eBook Red Cloud at Dawn: Truman, Stalin, and the End of the Atomic Monopoly download

by Michael D. Gordin

Free eBook Red Cloud at Dawn: Truman, Stalin, and the End of the Atomic Monopoly download ISBN: 0312655428
Author: Michael D. Gordin
Publisher: Picador; First edition (November 23, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 416
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Military
Size MP3: 1317 mb
Size FLAC: 1951 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: lrf mbr lit lrf


Following a trail of espionage, secrecy, deception, political brinksmanship, and technical innovation, Michael D. Gordin challenges conventional technology-centered nuclear histories by looking at the prominent roles that atomic intelligence and other forms of information play in the uncertainties of nuclear arms development and political decision-making. With the use of newly opened archives, Red Cloud at Dawn focuses on the extraordinary story of First Lightning to provide a fresh understanding of the origins of the nuclear arms race, as well as the all-too-urgent problem of proliferation.

In Red Cloud at Dawn, Michael Gordin zeros in on the crucial years from Hiroshima to the first flash of ‘Joe 1' in 1949, the first Russian bomb and the ninth nuclear explosion. Using a spectacular variety of sources from Soviet and American sources, Gordin gives us a book that must be read to understand how we came to the sprawling nuclear proliferation in which we now live. Peter Galison, Joseph Pellegrino University Professor, Harvard University

Xii, 402 pages : 24 cm. With the use of newly opened archives, "Red Cloud at Dawn" focuses on the extraordinary story of First Lightning-the first Soviet test bomb detonated in 1949-to provide a fresh understanding of the origins of the . .

Xii, 402 pages : 24 cm. With the use of newly opened archives, "Red Cloud at Dawn" focuses on the extraordinary story of First Lightning-the first Soviet test bomb detonated in 1949-to provide a fresh understanding of the origins of the nuclear arms race, as well as the all-too-urgent problem of proliferation. Includes bibliographical references (pages 377-379) and index. Atomic monopoly - How much time do we have? -. - Larger than Enormoz - First lightning - Making Vermont - Dramatizing the situation - The year of Joe.

Gordin’s Red Cloud at Dawn is about the brief period between August 1945 and August 1949, between Hiroshima and Kazakhstan, when the United States held a nuclear monopoly. It’s about how the Soviets caught up and how America learned that that happy hour was ending a lot sooner than expected. This is a book full of great details, like the importance of German uranium to the Soviet bomb effort, and the early technologies explored by the Americans as they sought a way to detect an eventual Soviet detonation

With the use of newly opened archives, Red Cloud at Dawn focuses on the extraordinary story of First Lightning to provide a fresh . Michael D. Gordin is an associate professor of the history of science at Princeton University

With the use of newly opened archives, Red Cloud at Dawn focuses on the extraordinary story of First Lightning to provide a fresh understanding of the origins of the nuclear arms race, as well as the all-too-urgent problem of proliferation. Gordin is an associate professor of the history of science at Princeton University. He is the author of Five Days in August: How World War II Became a Nuclear War.

On August 29, 1949, the first Soviet test bomb, dubbed First Lightning, exploded in the deserts of Kazakhstan. Categories: History\Military History. Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

As Gordin argues, the Soviet Union’s desire for an atomic bomb stemmed directly from President Truman’s decision to withhold nuclear secrets from Stalin and his regime at the end of WWII; thus, prompting the Soviets to turn towards espionage and theft in their race to end American.

As Gordin argues, the Soviet Union’s desire for an atomic bomb stemmed directly from President Truman’s decision to withhold nuclear secrets from Stalin and his regime at the end of WWII; thus, prompting the Soviets to turn towards espionage and theft in their race to end American domination and control over nuclear technology.

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Part of the problem is the intelligence infrastructure of the United States in the monopoly is extremely weak and fragmented.

He challenges conventional technology-centered nuclear histories by looking at the prominent role that atomic intelligence and other forms of information play in the uncertainties of nuclear arms development and political decision making. Part of the problem is the intelligence infrastructure of the United States in the monopoly is extremely weak and fragmented.

A NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW EDITORS' CHOICE

On August 29, 1949, the first Soviet test bomb, dubbed "First Lightning," exploded in the deserts of Kazakhstan. This surprising international event marked the beginning of an arms race that would ultimately lead to nuclear proliferation beyond the two superpowers of the Soviet Union and the United States.

With the use of newly opened archives, Michael D. Gordin folows a trail of espionage, secrecy, deception, political brinksmanship, and technical innovation to provide a fresh understanding of the nuclear arms race.

User reviews
Shadowbourne
August 29,1949 would have been another day in the history of mankind, had it not been the day when the American monopoly over the atom bomb had come to an end.On that day,the first Soviet bomb, called "First Lightning" exploded in the deserts of Kazakhstan.This event was to lead to nuclear proliferation beyond the two supepowers.
The book starts with the Potsdam Conference, where Truman had revealed to the Russian dictator Stalin that the USA were in the possession of a devastating weapon.Stalin remained calm and it was at this point where speculation started as to the reasons of why Stalin has reacted(or did not react)the way he had.One thing was clear:the Russians knew berofehand about the American atom project,called "Manhattan".They obtained this information from so many spies who were responsible for transmitting this news to them.These spies were not necessarily employed by the GRU or the NKGB bosses.There were many scientists, like Klaus Fuchs or Alan Nunn May who were working for comrade Stalin because they shared his ideological ideas.The extent of espionage about the "Manhattan Project" for the development of the first Soviet nuclear bomb became known after the Russian archives holding relevant materials
opened their gates to the public and scholars alike.One of Moscow spymasters was Pavel Sudoplatov-the man who was also responsible for dispatching the man who would assassinate Leon Trotsky in Mexico in 1940.Sudoplatov claimed that Beria summoned him in February 1944 to head a new department (dubbed "S") to deal with atomic espionage.This department was to integrate the information which the NKGB and the GRU got from their various sources.The name of the whole espionage operation was "Enormoz",showing the extent of suh a mammoth enterprise.
There were many rings of spies that were vying for the atom secrets.The most famous one was the notorious Cambridge Five Group.Among its members there were Kim Philby and Guy Burgess.
Then the defection of Igor Gouzenko, a Russian cipher clerk ,in Canada in 1945, demonstrated again what the west had suspected before: the most secret project of theirs was riddlled with spies and informers.
But ,as Professor Gordin makes it clear, all this information was not good enough for the Russians.They had so many pieces of information but they never knew whether these purloined secret papers were authentic or part of a deception plan.Second, they needed a lot of scientists to make sense of the huge amount of information that was making its way to the center of Moscow.
Third, the Russians were not naive.At the end of WW2, they have taken steps in order to ensure that Nazi scientists ,who were suspected of having relevant infornmation about nuclear fission,would be convinced to cross over to their side.The recruitment of German scientists was to take part during May to November 1945 and this process continued until 1948.The recruited were scientists, engineers and lab assistants-three hundred in all.
The following chapters of the book detail the everyday routine of those working to satisfy Stalin and his henchman, Beria.Professor Gordin asks many questions about what each side knew or did not know about the other's intentions.
We also get a very detailed account of the American reactions when they heard about the successful Russian experiment.These is done with the help of many American and Russian sources offering new perspectives on the issue.He highlights the role played by key players in this drama, such as Bernard Baruch,David Lilienthal and Dean Acheson as well as those scientists who were responsible for the development of the Russian bomb.
Nuclear proliferation started in 1949 and is still with us,unfortunately.This is why this book is so relevant and merits to be read by everyone who cares about our planet.
Gajurus
interesting.
Haracetys
"Red Cloud at Dawn" focuses on a relatively short time period of the Atomic Age, from 1945 to 1952. It does so with laser-like intensity. It begins with the tripartite Potsdam Conference, at which Harry Truman, Clement Attlee and Josef Stalin discussed their post-World-War-II plans and priorities, and during which the U.S. ushered in the Atomic Age by testing its atomic bomb at Trinity Site in New Mexico. It basically ends with the U.S. test of the world's first successful thermonuclear device at Eniwetok in the Pacific. In between, author Michael D. Gordin's story is mostly about how the Soviet Union was able to develop and test its own atomic bomb, and thus end the U.S. nuclear monopoly, years before most experts expected.

Dr. Gordin weaves together several strands in his tale of the early Soviet atomic bomb program. He shows how Stalin's bomb makers used open-source and declassified literature, espionage and indigenous capabilities to build a clone of the Trinity device, but then quickly moved beyond that to develop their own designs. He shows how America developed the key long-range detection technology that enabled Truman to confidently announce the first Soviet test in 1949, before the Soviets did. And he looks at the events and personalities that fomented suspicion and mistrust among the nuclear-armed powers and triggered the nuclear arms race that obsessed both the U.S. and the Soviet Union for nearly half a century.

Dr. Gordin presents the story of a relatively little known aspect of the history of nuclear weapons with consummate skill, insightful analysis and a refreshingly objective approach. "Red Cloud at Dawn" looks at a few dangerous years at the beginning of the Cold War that set the tone for the future and later brought the world to the brink of thermonuclear war. If you're interested in the history of nuclear weapons, and in learning how we've come to terms with them in the years since the Manhattan Project unleashed the atomic genie, you need to read "Red Cloud at Dawn." It earns my highest recommendation.