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Free eBook Into the Mountains Dark: A WWII Odyssey from Harvard Crimson to Infantry Blue download

by Franklin L. Gurley

Free eBook Into the Mountains Dark: A WWII Odyssey from Harvard Crimson to Infantry Blue download ISBN: 0966638948
Author: Franklin L. Gurley
Publisher: The Aberjona Press (October 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 255
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Military
Size MP3: 1604 mb
Size FLAC: 1906 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: mobi doc lrf mbr


Franklin Gurley has put on paper his memoirs in 1945-1946 while in Germany as part of the occupation force. Unfortunately Franklin Gurley didn't put down his whole story. The book is a reprint, it looks like the maps are not the original ones

Franklin Gurley has put on paper his memoirs in 1945-1946 while in Germany as part of the occupation force. The story is therefore precise with many facts and interviews recollected from his teammates. The authors goal was to put on paper, the way he found himself involved into the conflict and how he went through it. He basically tells his personal story for his family. The book is a reprint, it looks like the maps are not the original ones. There is a contradiction between map page 186 et mape 202, they don't indicate the same hill as being hill 26. !

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Into the Mountains Dark book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Into the Mountains Dark: A WWII Odyssey from Harvard Crimson to Infantry Blue. by. Franklin L. Gurley.

Home Gurley, Franklin L. INTO THE MOUNTAINS DARK : A. .This book is purely the candid, point-blank thoughts of an intelligent 18-year ol. INTO THE MOUNTAINS DARK : A WW II ODYSSEY FROM HARVARD CRIMSON. Into the mountains dark : a ww II odyssey from harvard crimson to infantry blue. The verified, uncensored diary of an American WWII infantryman, from enlistment in 1943 through his baptism of fire in the rugged Vosges Mountains of France in late 1944.

book by Franklin L. Into the Mountains Dark : A WWII Odyssey from Harvard Crimson to Infantry Blue. by Franklin L. When 17-year old freshman Frank Gurley was placed second in his first Harvard varsity cross-country meet, he thought he had achieved the ultimate in courage and tenacity.

This book is purely the candid, point-blank thoughts of an intelligent 18-year old infantry scout, and includes . A significant combat memoir written by a young US soldier during the bitter fighting in the Vosges Mountains, 1944-45.

A significant combat memoir written by a young US soldier during the bitter fighting in the Vosges Mountains, 1944-45.

Into the Long Dark Night. Into the Mountains Dark: A WWII Odyssey from Harvard Crimson to Infantry Blue by Franklin Gurley. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Author: Franklin Gurley. Title: Into the Mountains Dark: A WWII Odyssey from Harvard Crimson to Infantry Blue. Help us to make General-Ebooks better! Genres.

Full Title: Into the Mountains Dark: A WWII Odyssey from Harvard Crimson to Infantry Blue. The book is broken down into nineteen chapters, that take the author from 1939 through his participation in the Vosges Mountains as a member of the 100th Infantry Division. This book is different, in that it grew out of a violation of Army regulations. The author had written for his high school paper, as well as for the Harvard Crimson university paper. The first two chapters introduce the author, and provide some background to help understand him as a person. They discuss his experiences as a Boy Scout, writing for the high school paper, and sneaking into Fenway Park to watch the Red Sox play.

Subtitled: A WWII Odyssey from Harvard Crimson to Infantry Blue. Instead, like most others in this program, he found himself in the infantry (100th Div) following the casualties in Italy. I don't think it lived up to the hype. The author does a good job outlining the various changes of the program and how this affected him. There are also some reasonable passages describing basic training and the characters he trained with.

Franklin Louis Gurley, American lawyer, military historian. Bar: Massachusetts 1952, New York 1956, Illinois 1956, Michigan 1956, District of Columbia 1956. Decorated Bronze Star, Combat Infantry Badge; 7th Army mile run champion, 1945; set West Point and Heptagonal 1000-yard records in track, 1948.

in Franklin L. Gurley’s (A/399) Into the Mountains Dark: A WWII Odyssey from Harvard Crimson to Infantry.

One thing that puzzled us for a bit was the lack of gas mask carriers seen in photographs of the regiment and of the division from November and December of 1944 as well as the lack of mention of the bags or the masks in Franklin L. It turns out that beginning in July of 1944 Col. John C. MacArthur, Chemical Warfare Officer, .

The verified, uncensored diary of an American WWII infantryman, from enlistment in 1943 through his baptism of fire in the rugged Vosges Mountains of France in late 1944. This book is purely the candid, point-blank thoughts of an intelligent 18-year old infantry scout, and includes honest accounts and reflections on leadership, training, and comradeship, good and bad, inspirational and disappointing. Kept in violation of US Army policies which forbade the maintenance of personal journals in combat, what was once an operational security violation is now a brilliant vehicle for understanding the experiences of an American infantryman...the last time America defeated a world-class foe!

6" x 9" soft cover format; 255 pp.; seven highly-detailed, original maps and diagrams; 40 photos and illustrations; index.

User reviews
Vetibert
A great read as it had many references to my who died inWW2 ,Along with all the other stories of the 399th infantry.
Foxanayn
Franklin Gurley has put on paper his memoirs in 1945-1946 while in Germany as part of the occupation force. The story is therefore precise with many facts and interviews recollected from his teammates.

The authors goal was to put on paper, the way he found himself involved into the conflict and how he went through it. He basically tells his personal story for his family.

The book is very good, I found it a bit long at the beginning but kept reading and it became very interesting. You feel when the soldier slowly gets closer to the enemy and finally directly involved and confronted to the fact that he might die very soon. His whole company got decimated in a few minutes !!!

Unfortunately Franklin Gurley didn't put down his whole story.
The book is a reprint, it looks like the maps are not the original ones. The Editor has probably introduced mistakes by updating the maps. There is a contradiction between map page 186 et mape 202, they don't indicate the same hill as being hill 262.8! First location seems wrong.

You might like Wolf Zoepf "seven days in January" and Guy Sayer "the forgotten soldier".
Mbon
I had been looking forward to getting hold of this book due to the glowing comments on the book ad pages in various military magazines. I don't think it lived up to the hype.

The author was one of those 'College' soldiers who was being educated by the army in order to be ready for employment in various technical fields down the track. Instead, like most others in this program, he found himself in the infantry (100th Div) following the casualties in Europe.

The author does a good job outlining the various changes of the program and how this affected him. There are also some reasonable passages describing basic training and the characters he trained with. This went on to about Page 100, which I thought was a bit long given the total length of the book. Once, the 100th arrived in France it was sent to the Vosges Mountains. Here the author details his companies experiences in combat in the first few weeks. Again, some reasonable stuff here, a fair bit of attention is given to the constant digging of foxholes, the hunger and the tension. The author, essentially gives a company history, with the points of view and experiences of many others in his unit told. He does write about his own experiences but these were of a modest nature and hence my issue with the 'breathless' comments made in those reviews. The most bizarre thing though is that the book stops with the first events in the Vosges. The author soldiered on to the end of the war and earned himself a Bronze Star in December 44!! I am at a loss as to why the rest of his story is missing.

Compared to other memiors, this account lacks the punch and the gore that make this genre so compelling. It is certainly well written, and the author is the 'real deal' as a soldier but it was hard to get involved in the story. It seems he meant to do a sort of company history and here there is a lot on the other men in the unit, the incompetents, the cowards and the many who just did their best. So there is value in the reading of this book but for me, it is on the second level of such things.
Runeterror
This book is different, in that it grew out of a violation of Army regulations. The author had written for his high school paper, as well as for the Harvard Crimson university paper. When he went to combat, he maintained an unauthorized journal. He was aided by his comrades, while his superiors "turned the other way." Thus, when he sat down decades later, he didn't have to recall events from half a century before. His journal notes were hours, or at most a day or two old. It shows in the telling of his story.

The book is broken down into nineteen chapters, that take the author from 1939 through his participation in the Vosges Mountains as a member of the 100th Infantry Division. The first two chapters introduce the author, and provide some background to help understand him as a person. They discuss his experiences as a Boy Scout, writing for the high school paper, and sneaking into Fenway Park to watch the Red Sox play. Managing to make the grade to get into Harvard University, he also joined the track team. His coach there was Jaakko Mikkola, who had coached the Finnish Olympic teams in 1920 and 1924. However, one of the definite highlights of his time at Harvard was when he got to listen to Winston Churchill speak in September 1943.

Having been accepted to the Army's A-12 Program. This was a commissioning program, similar to the ROTC program. Qualifying for this meant that the author spent one semester at Harvard, then was sent to Ohio University with 583 other "Army scholars" who had become part of the Army Specialized Training Program, (ASTP), also known as the "Ain't Safe Till Peace" program. Here he was to study Basic Engineering, along with the rest of the course load. It was here that he had his first experience with anti-Semitism. The cadet appointed to the position of company commander had been born in Palestine, and this bothered some of the cadets. A couple of them went to far as to try to get the Jewish cadets moved out of the building they were billeted in. However, this attempt didn't go anywhere.

By the end of March, 1944, the ASTP had been dissolved, and the men in it had been assigned to the infantry. The author was assigned to the 399th Infantry Regiment, and his training began. By the time it was over, he was designated as his platoon's second scout, narrowly talking his way out of being an assistant BAR-man. The training regimen ended at the close of August 1944, and by the end of the following month, the 100th Division was entrained for the Port of Embarkation at New York.

After being welcomed to France by Axis Sally, the troops disembarked at Marseilles, and moved into a nearby encampment. It wasn't long before they moved to the front, after a short stint as stevedores. They ended up in the High Vosges, just in time for winter. The story then goes into combat around St. Remy and La Salle, which blooded many of these men.

The men went through a couple of weeks combat in that area. What is interesting here is the detail that the author is able to go into. Drawing from his contemporary notes, he is able to vividly help the reader understand the experiences of his unit in action. The combat, waiting for combat, and even dealing with the locals, aided by his knowledge of the French language, is described in a manner that can easily bring the reader right into the foxholes with the "Century Men." Gurley is able to describe not only the emotions the men felt, but all the physical discomfort and challenges, including mind numbing fatigue that causes a potentially serious security lapse. Even simple problems such as reloading a rifle with fingers that won't cooperate.

The final chapters inform the readers of several other smaller actions that the men of Gurley's regiment endured. This is the important part of the book. Not a wide-ranging story of the Alsatian Campaign, or Operation Nordwind, it is a view inside the foxholes of men in combat. The author tells his story, but he manages to do It while freely sharing the spotlight with his comrades. That is one of the things that I really liked about the book. He doesn't simply write a book about "what I did in the war." Here, you find more of a "how we fought our war, and I was in there too" attitude.

Here, you will find one of the best descriptions of what war was like for a bunch of men who weren't supposed to be in the infantry. Men who should have received more training than they did. Men who when faced with the ultimate challenge, responded in the best way they knew how, and managed to carry the day.

As a disclaimer, I will state here that while I am associated with The Aberjona Press, I was not involved with the production of this book in any way.