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Free eBook Tudor Warships (1): Henry VIII’s Navy (New Vanguard) download

by Angus Konstam,Tony Bryan

Free eBook Tudor Warships (1): Henry VIII’s Navy (New Vanguard) download ISBN: 1846032512
Author: Angus Konstam,Tony Bryan
Publisher: Osprey Publishing (April 22, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 48
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Europe
Size MP3: 1445 mb
Size FLAC: 1246 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: lrf mbr rtf azw


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Examining the operational use of Henry's Tudor warships the author analyzes the battle of the Solent in 1545.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In this book, expert Angus Konstam explores the fledging Tudor Navy, tracing its history, from its origins as a merchant fleet under Henry VII through to its emergence as a powerful force under Henry VIII.

Tudor Warships (1) book.

In this book, expert Angus Konstam explores the fledging Tudor Navy, tracing its history, from its origins as a merchant fleet under Henry VII through to its emergence as a powerful force under Henry VIII

In this book, expert Angus Konstam explores the fledging Tudor Navy, tracing its history, from its origins as a merchant fleet under Henry VII through to its emergence as a powerful force under Henry VIII. Examining the operational use of Henry's Tudor warships the author analyzes the battle of the Solent in 1545, in which Henry's fleet took on a French fleet of 200 ships - much larger than the Spanish Armada decades later. Despite the well documented loss of his flagship, the Mary Rose Henry's smaller force succeeded in preventing a French victory.

Series: New Vanguard 14. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Series: New Vanguard 142. File: PDF, 1. 0 MB. Читать онлайн. Распространяем знания с 2009. Пользовательское соглашение.

Angus Konstam- Nr. 142. Facts. Title: Tudor Warships (1) Henry VIII's Navy. Author: Angus Konstam. We are aware of 10 similar reference publications related to "Reference books (Cross topic-Ships)". Las Fuerzas Navales en la Guerra Civil Espanolas 267 Reproducciones Fotograficas de Barcos. Testimonio de Actualidad Nr.

In this book, expert Angus Konstam explores the fledging Tudor Navy, tracing its history, from its origins .

In this book, expert Angus Konstam explores the fledging Tudor Navy, tracing its history, from its origins as a merchant fleet under Henry VII through to its emergence as a powerful force under Henry VIII.

During this ebook, specialist Angus Konstam explores the fledging Tudor military, tracing its background, from its origins as a service provider .

During this ebook, specialist Angus Konstam explores the fledging Tudor military, tracing its background, from its origins as a service provider fleet less than Henry VII via to its emergence as a strong strength below Henry VIII. The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War.

In this book, expert Angus Konstam explores the fledging Tudor Navy, tracing its history, from its origins as a merchant fleet under Henry VII through to its emergence as a powerful force under Henry VIII. Examining the operational use of Henry's Tudor warships the author analyzes the battle of the Solent in 1545, in which Henry's fleet took on a French fleet of 200 ships - much larger than the Spanish Armada decades later. Despite the well documented loss of his flagship, the Mary Rose Henry's smaller force succeeded in preventing a French victory. Although many people will have heard of the mighty Mary Rose, this book will tell the story of more than just the tragic sinking of Henry's flagship, describing how one of history's most dynamic kings grew the navy from the five warships that were his father's legacy to fifty-three deadly gunships at the forefront of his empire-building strategy. Through contemporary illustrations and intricate artwork, the author traces the changing face of warship design during the Renaissance as Henry paved the way for English dominance of the sea.
User reviews
Reemiel
Anyone with any interest in the history of ships and sailing must necessarily welcome any addition to the subject, particularly one which touches on the critical period between 1400 and 1600 AD, a time when the wallowing cog of the Middle Ages gave way to the caravel, the preferred "vessel of discovery" which opened the world to Europe and Europe to the world. From the caravel evolved the carrack and then the galleon and, ultimately, the "ship" as we currently know it. With those developments, Europe spread out to find, and ultimately to conquer the rest of the world. Regrettably, the number of books dedicated to that period and subject is so limited that it can be comfortably accommodated on a relatively small shelf. This is a slim volume and deserves a place on that shelf.

Of all the ship types which arose during that remarkable transitional period, perhaps the most fascinating - and certainly the most exuberantly picturesque - was the carrack, the "greate shippe", which was the Titanic, the Dreadnought, and the Nimitz of its time. It was also the carrack which was the pride, if not the mainstay, of the early Tudor "Navy Royale", and this volume covers, in reasonable, if hardly exhaustive detail, that ship type, with a modest amount of text devoted to the barques and galleasses and other vessel types which filled out Henry VIII's fleet. It also covers the development of the ship as a "gun platform" (as opposed to a floating castle), in which process the Tudor navy was foremost.

This is a fairly typical Osprey offering - a good, if limited discussion of the history, construction, and usages of the ships of the time, supplemented with copious illustrations and superb color artwork. Like all Osprey works, however, it is rather strictly circumscribed in terms of the subject covered. This is the fleet of Henry VII and Henry VIII, and not much else. That is not usually a major objection, because there are usually plenty of other and supplemental books and treatises (including others from Osprey) which flesh out the subject. Not so here, however, and this offering suffers from that lack. There is simply no historical context in which this book can take its place, no other works which document the development of the carrack and the other early Tudor ship types, no overview of the "great carracks" or the galleasses of Spain and Portugal and Genoa and Venice which provided the model for the Tudor navy, with the result that this book rather feels as tho' one is attempting to reconstruct an entire era from a couple of snapshots. As part of an entire series which documents the transition from cog to caravel to carrack to galleon, from clinker built to carvel hulled, from oars to sail, this book would be completely adequate. Standing essentially alone, as it does, that lack of supportive materials tends to emphasize the restricted scope of the subject.
Tantil
Was hoping for more pictures but well written..