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by Michael Hicks

Free eBook Revolution and Consumption in Late Medieval England (The Fifteenth Century) download ISBN: 0851158323
Author: Michael Hicks
Publisher: Boydell Press (October 4, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 208
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Europe
Size MP3: 1908 mb
Size FLAC: 1825 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: rtf lrf mbr azw


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Start by marking Revolution and Consumption in Late Medieval England as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Topics range from the diet of the nobility in the fifteenth century to the knightly household of Richard II and the peace commissions, while particular case stu The essays in this volume focus on the sources and resources of political power, on consumption (royal and lay, conspicuous and everyday) on political revolution and on economic regulation in the later middle ages.

Fast and fast - conspicuous consumption and the diet of the nobility in the 15th century, Christopher Woolgar exploitation and control - the royal administration of magnate estates, 1397-1405, Alastair Dunn the knightly household of Richard II and the peace commissions, Shelagh Mitchell the Earl of Warwick and the royal affinity in the politics of the West Midlands, 1389-99, Alison Gundy the.

The topics range from the diet of the nobility in the fifteenth century to the knightly household of Richard II and the . Professor Michael Hicks teaches at King Alfred's College at Winchester.

The topics range from the diet of the nobility in the fifteenth century to the knightly household of Richard II and the peace commissions, while particular case studies, of Middlesex, Cambridge, Durham Cathedral and Winchester, shed new light on regional economies through an examination of the patterns of consumption, retailing, and marketing. The contributors include: Christopher Woolgar, Alastair Dunn, Shelagh Mitchell, Alison Gundy, .

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Volume 63, Issue 2. June 2003, pp. 577-578. Revolution and Consumption in Late Medieval England. Woodbridge, UK: The Boydell Press, 2001. Full text views reflects the number of PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views. Total number of HTML views: 0. Total number of PDF views: 0 .

Michael Hicks is Professor of Medieval History at the University of Winchester. Bibliographic information. Revolution and Consumption in Late Medieval England Volume 2 of Fifteenth century, ISSN 1479-9871. He is an historian of Late medieval England, especially the nobility and the Wars of the Roses. Other academic interests are the Late medieval English church, especially chantries, and English regional and local history. He devised and directed the project on English inland trade.

The essays in this volume focus on the sources and resources of political power, on consumption (royal and lay, conspicuous and everyday) on political revolution and on economic regulation . Michael Hicks, Michael A. Hicks.

The essays in this volume focus on the sources and resources of political power, on consumption (royal and lay, conspicuous and everyday) on political revolution and on economic regulation in the later middle ages. The essays in this volume focus on the sources and resources of political power, on consumption (royal and lay, conspicuous and everyday) on political revolution and on economic regulation in the later middle ages.

Conspicuous consumption in the 15th century both offers causes for revolt and . Oligarchy in the Late Medieval Town - Peter W Fleming.

Conspicuous consumption in the 15th century both offers causes for revolt and allows reconstruction of regional supply and trading networks. Topics range from the diet of the nobility in the fifteenth century to the knightly household of Richard II and the peace commissions, while particular case studies, of Middlesex, Cambridge, Durham Cathedral and Winchester, shed new light on regional economies through an examination of the patterns of consumption, retailing, and marketing.

Britnell, Richard, 2003. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Michael Hicks explores the standards, values and principles . Books related to English Political Culture in the Fifteenth Century.

Michael Hicks explores the standards, values and principles that motivated contemporary politicians, and the aspirations and interests of both dukes and peasants alike. Hicks argues that the Wars of the Roses did not result from fundamental weaknesses in the political system but from the collision of exceptional circumstances that quickly passed away. Overall, he shows that the era was one of stability and harmony, and that there were effective mechanisms for keeping the peace. Structure and continuities, Hicks argues, were more prominent than change.

The article studies the social and value orientations of the London merchants in the 15th - 16th centuries, when the English . The Fifteenth Century: Revolution and Consumption in Late Medieval England, ed. by M.

The article studies the social and value orientations of the London merchants in the 15th - 16th centuries, when the English society was on its difficult way of transition from the Middle Ages to th.

The essays in this volume focus on the sources and resources of political power, on consumption (royal and lay, conspicuous and everyday) on political revolution and on economic regulation in the later middle ages. Topics range from the diet of the nobility in the fifteenth century to the knightly household of Richard II and the peace commissions, while particular case studies, of Middlesex, Cambridge, Durham Cathedral and Winchester, shed new light on regional economies through an examination of the patterns of consumption, retailing, and marketing.Professor MICHAEL HICKS teaches at King Alfred's College at Winchester.Contributors: CHRISTOPHER WOOLGAR, ALASTAIR DUNN, SHELAGH MITCHELL, ALISON GUNDY, T.B. PUGH, JESSICA FREEMAN, JOHN HARE, JOHN LEE, MIRANDA THRELFALL-HOLMES, WINIFRED HARWOOD, PETER FLEMING.