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Free eBook Engineering the Revolution download

by Ken Alder

Free eBook Engineering the Revolution download ISBN: 0691009694
Author: Ken Alder
Publisher: Princeton University Press (July 19, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 496
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Europe
Size MP3: 1714 mb
Size FLAC: 1712 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: rtf docx doc lit


Engineering the Revolution Alder Ken Wiley 9780226012643 : Documents the forging of a fresh relationship between technology and politics in Revolutionary France, and the inauguration of a dist.

Engineering the Revolution Alder Ken Wiley 9780226012643 : Documents the forging of a fresh relationship between technology and politics in Revolutionary France, and the inauguration of a dist. Кол-во: о цене Наличие: Отсутствует. Возможна поставка под заказ. При оформлении заказа до: 23 авг 2019 Ориентировочная дата поставки: конец Сентября При условии наличия книги у поставщика.

His description of work in the weapons industry and his analysis of the effects of standard measures, such as jigs and gauges, is both fascinating and enlightening.

by. Ken Alder (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. His description of work in the weapons industry and his analysis of the effects of standard measures, such as jigs and gauges, is both fascinating and enlightening. His treatment of the arms manufacturing during the Year II furnishes useful data on this extraordinary phase of the Revolution. -Sam Scott, The Journal of Military History.

This is a very ambitious book. Alder is interested in writing history of technology as a form of social and political history. Parts of the book are somewhat repetitive as Alder revisits some issues from different perspectives. A recurrent and much discussed theme in this book is that technologies do not occur in a vacuum but rather reflect social and political realities and sometime embody the objectives and needs of their makers. Musket manufacture in this context has several interesting dimensions. Alder tends to belabor the social-political nature of the history of technology, making fairly obvious points repeatedly.

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Engineering the Revolution documents the forging of a new relationship between technology and politics in Revolutionary France, and the inauguration of a distinctively modern form of the "e;technological life. artifacts emerge as the outcome of political struggle.

Description: Engineering the Revolution documents the forging of a new relationship between technology and .

Description: Engineering the Revolution documents the forging of a new relationship between technology and politics in Revolutionary France, and the inauguration of a distinctively modern form of the technological life.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Does Technology Drive History?

Alder's first book, Engineering the Revolution: Arms and Enlightenment in France, 1763-1815 (Princeton, 1997; 2nd .

Alder's first book, Engineering the Revolution: Arms and Enlightenment in France, 1763-1815 (Princeton, 1997; 2nd e. Chicago, 2010), won the 1998 Edelstein Prize from the Society of the History of Technology. That book used the history of a particular artifact-the gun-to rewrite the history of the political and scientific changes that accompanied the French Revolution.

Engineering the Revolution documents the forging of a new relationship between technology and politics in Revolutionary France, and the inauguration of a distinctively modern form of the "technological life.

Ken Alder (Alder, Ken). used books, rare books and new books. Find all books by 'Ken Alder' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Ken Alder'. Engineering the Revolution. The Lie Detectors: The History of an American Obsession. ISBN 9780743259880 (978-0-7432-5988-0) Hardcover, Free Press, 2007.

The French Revolution and Industrial Revolution together inaugurated the modern era. But recent historical "revisionists" have divorced eighteenth-century material conditions from concurrent political struggles. This book's anti-teleological approach repudiates technological determinism to document the forging of a new relationship between technology and politics in Revolutionary France. It does so through the history of a particular artifact--the gun. Expanding the "political" to include conflict over material objects, Ken Alder rethinks the nature of engineering rationality, the origins of mass production, and our interpretation of the French Revolution.

Near the end of the Enlightenment, a cadre of artillery engineers transformed the design, production, and deployment of military guns. Part 1 shows how the gun, the first artifact amenable to scientific analysis, was redesigned by engineers committed to new meritocratic forms of technological knowledge and how the Revolutionaries and artillery officer Napoleon exploited their techno-social designs.

Part 2 shows how the gun became the first artifact to be mass producedwith interchangeable parts, as French engineers deployed "objective" drawings and automatic machinery to enforce production standards in the face of artisanal resistance. And Part 3 places the gun at the center of a technocratic revolution led by engineers on the Committee of Public Safety, a revolution whose failure inaugurated modern capitalist techno-politics. This book offers a challenging demonstration of how material artifacts emerge as the negotiated outcome of political struggle.