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Free eBook The Fall of the French Monarchy: Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette and the download

by Munro Price

Free eBook The Fall of the French Monarchy: Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette and the download ISBN: 0330488279
Author: Munro Price
Publisher: Pan Books (June 6, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 448
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Europe
Size MP3: 1449 mb
Size FLAC: 1610 mb
Rating: 4.3
Format: lit txt doc azw


In acclaimed historian Munro Price's powerful new book, he confronts one of the enduring mysteries of the French Revolution--what were the true actions and feelings of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette as they watched their sovereignty collapse? Dragged back from Versailles to Paris.

They were compelled for their own safety to approve the Revolution and its agenda. Yet, in deep secrecy, they soon began to develop a very different, and dangerous, strategy.

The central character in this new evidence is the Baron de Breteuil, Louis's ambassador in exile, who orchestrated doomed escape plans and co-ordinated the international response to the revolution.

To Revolutionary France and the rest of the world, Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette presented a face of. .

To Revolutionary France and the rest of the world, Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette presented a face of accommodation. Through previously undiscovered documents, historian Munro Price sheds new light on the true motives of the royal family and provides answers to questions that have beguiled historians for centuries.

In acclaimed historian Munro Price's powerful new book, he confronts one of the enduring mysteries of the French Revolution--what were the true actions and feelings of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette as they watched their sovereignty collapse?Dragged back from Versailles to Paris b.

Munro Price's history of how Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette confronted the French Revolution comes at a less than propitious time. In a month from now, we will see Timothy Tackett's book on the Flight to Varennes.

The Fall of the French Monarchy: Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette and the baron de Breteuil (Macmillan, 2002) won . It was published in the .

The Fall of the French Monarchy: Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette and the baron de Breteuil (Macmillan, 2002) won the Franco-British Society’s Enid McLeod Literary Prize. It was shortlisted for the Longman-History Today Prize, and the Hessell-Tiltman Prize. in 2003 with the title The Road from Versailles: Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette, and the Fall of the French Monarchy by St. Martin's Press. It was published in Brazil in 2007 with the title A Queda da Monarquia Francesa. Luis XVI, Maria Antonieta et o barao de Breteuil.

Munro Price was born in London, and was educated there and in Cambridge, where he took his Ph.

Munro Price was born in London, and was educated there and in Cambridge, where he took his PhD. He specializes in eighteenth and early nineteenth-century France, and has lived and taught in Lyon and Paris. He is currently Professor of Modern European in History at the University of Bradford. His previous, critically acclaimed book, The Fall of the French Monarchy, won the Franco-British Society's Literary Prize and was shortlisted for the Wolfson History Prize and the Longman-History Today Prize. Country of Publication.

This is a history of the French Revolution, as.The Road from Versailles: Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette, and the Fall of the French Monarchy.

This is a history of the French Revolution, as seen through the eyes of the French royal family. The Perilous Crown: France Between Revolutions, 1814-1848.

This definitive study moves well beyond such works as Michel Vovelle's The Fall of the French Monarchy. -Jim Doyle, Sara Hightower Regional Library, Rome, Georgia, Library Journal.

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Munro Price has meticulously researched the mood, atmosphere and personalities behind the palace walls. At the heart of this research is a cache of letters that sheds new light on the lives of the royals, as the monarchy was gradually stripped of its power and revolutionary fervour called for their execution. The central character in this new evidence is the Baron de Breteuil, Louis's ambassador in exile, who orchestrated doomed escape plans and co-ordinated the international response to the revolution.This new book reassesses a perennially interesting period of history and will shed fresh insight into one of the real tuning points in European history
User reviews
Mr.Savik
No Problem
Kizshura
Author Munro Price has shown that intense research combined with informative speculation is consistent with successfully piecing together a very confusing and torrid sequence of events in Western European history. Price, through what appears to be pains taking information gathering, relays a brilliant account of the lives of some of the French Revolution's most influential players. He brings to light, to those not in the academic world, the Baron de Breteuil and his tremendous influence on the policy of counter-revolutionary France. Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, the recipients of the brunt of the Revolution, were shown both in their glory and in the flaws that led to their eventual demise. Price has not failed to impress with his clearly thought out formulations of the mindset and personal weaknesses of Louis XVI and, in contrast, the inner strength of Marie Antoinette. This book is easily followed and is difficult to put down. I recommend to anyone interested in this monumental period of political change in Europe.
Hanelynai
I got this book to learn a little about a topic I didn't know that much about. That I came away feeling that I was well-versed in the most esoteric of historical controversies is a testament to the quality of the work. The author has painstakingly researched the issues involved in the French Revolution. Everywhere in the book where a controversy is discussed, the author makes his conclusion, provides the evidence for his conclusion, and why he doesn't believe in alternative explanations. This comprehensive approach allows the reader to understand history not from the usual "because I say, it is so" approach, but to have a sense of how other theories might co-exist.

The narrative shows how close run a thing the French Revolution was and how many directions it might have taken. It also shows the struggles of two highly flawed individuals (the irresolute King and his stubborn, crafty wife) placed in the most complicated of situations. Most importantly, it focuses on Mssr. Bretieul, a French noble, who steadfastly negotiated on their behalf among foreign capitals for many hopeless years.

The book differs from others in that it shows the Revolution from an almost exclusively Royal point of view. Those looking for an overview of the Revolutionary side will be sorely disappointed. But, those who want to see insight into the minds of the royals, who fumbled and bumbled into an escalation that destroyed the tradition of ages, will revel in the fascinating story.
Mavegar
Munro Price's history of how Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette confronted the French Revolution comes at a less than propitious time. In a month from now, we will see Timothy Tackett's book on the Flight to Varennes. Tackett's previous books have been known for their thorough and exhaustive research, and his newest book may be a stark contrast to Price's which, as we will soon see, is comparatively under-researched. Nevertheless this book does have something of considerable value. It has been known that the royal couple were less than thrilled with the Constitution of 1791 and were trying to deal with foreign powers which France was at war with. But what were their real plans? Price's book offers some real answers.
The answers are convincing because they are not ones that Price is fully comfortable with. Price's colleague and occasional co-writer, John Hardman, has been the most pro-Louis historian for a couple of generations, even in one book comparing Louis to a saint. It is well known that Louis' last pre July 14 prime minister, the Baron de Breteuil was given special powers to talk to other foreign powers. (His letter of authority from the king, was forged, but Price reasonably argues that the Queen was just forcing the pace on her indecisive husband. The letter would not have worked if it did not represent Louis' views, and the plans for the Flight of Varennes could not have occurred without his knowledge and support.) But what were Louis XVI and Breteuil planning for France during the Flight to Varennes and the war with Europe? On at least two occasions the royal couple destroyed valuable documentation, while Breteuil was careful to leave as little information as possible. However with some diligence Price tracked down the papers of an ally of Breteuil, the Marquis de Bomballes, and found out what the royalists were planning. The result is devastating to Louis XVI's reputation.
Recently several scholars, most noticeably Keith Baker, have argued that by refusing a bicameral legislature in 1789, the National Assembly paved the way to totalitarianism and rejected reasonable compromise. It is clear from Bomballes' papers that the king had no interest in such a legislature. Royalists rejected it in 1789, and he and Breteuil rejected it several times in 1791-92. Louis had no interest in the Constitution of 1791, which he had swore to uphold, or using its mechanisms for amending it. He did not wish to go back to the National Assembly, but to the Estates General, giving the Nobles and the Clergy certain powers of veto. He did not plan to compromise with the Assemblies, but seek to use either his own troops to overwhelm them, or use the victory of foreign troops to get what he wanted. Although often unable to make a decision, these were his basic principles, pushed and prodded on by his wife.
This is the most valuable part of the book, and there are descriptions of the Flight of Varennes, the events of August 10 and the battle of Valmy that readers will find interesting. There are also interesting accounts of the royalist players, such as Breteuil's libidinous activities, and his daughter's affairs with an emigre bishop. I have some reservations about the book. (1) There are not that many new sources outside of the Bomballes papers, giving the book a somewhat padded feeling. (2) Certain counter-revolutionary activities could use more detail. There is only a brief mention of the affair of the Marquis de Favras, though Barry Shapiro in his book "Revolutionary Justice" points out that this was a major conspiracy which compromised the king's brother, Monsieur, later Louis XVIII. Price also briefly mentions a plan involving Danton to buy the royal family's freedom, which I would have liked to hear more about. (3) There is a somewhat indulgent tone about the royal couple, as Price tries to refute the idea that they were a pair of nitwits. This is not very convincing, especially since Price believes that Louis did not realize that ejaculation was a necessary condition for conception, while Marie Antoinette's suggestions were almost always unhelpful. At one point, in writing about the royal couple's last meeting before Louis was sent to a scaffold, Price sentimentally says that the two had found a kind of love, though he has elsewhere said that the Queen was sleeping with the Swedish aristocrat Fersen. (4) On certain points, like the royal couple's failure to conceive, or Breteuil's attitude towards Necker, Price relies on limited and self-serving sources. (5) Likewise he is not very acute on revolutionary "paranoia," particularly when he has shown that the republicans were right; the royal couple were traitors, and their treason implicated everyone who tried to deal with them in good faith. (6) Price has the odd tendency to claim that the king could have succeeded if he had just been decisive enough to call on the army. This is an odd argument, because every time it was considered the soldiers showed signs of mutiny and general untrustworthiness, whether it was at the fall of the Bastille, the Flight to Varennes, August 10, 1792, Lafayette's attempted coup, or Dumoriez's treason. And this was before they knew Louis' full plans. (6) Finally this is a history of a select group of individuals. We learn nothing about monarchist ideology or the royalist press, and we learn nothing about why the king never tried to mobilize public opinion on his side. The contrast with Britain, as seen in Linda Colley's "Britons", is rather striking.
Goldendragon
This book is a true pleasure to read. It focuses on a relatively small number of personalities and describes what they did- always backed up with research- and the consequences of their actions. The author's style is crisp, focussed and dignified, bereft of obscure or uncommon words that save you the frustration of constantly referring to the dictionary. It makes the principal charcters come to life.

The narrative quality is consistent and sustains your interest throughout. It is neither exhaustive, nor exhausting to read. I recommend it highly.