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Free eBook The Lost King of France: Revolution, Revenge and the Search for Louis XVII download

by DEBORAH CADBURY

Free eBook The Lost King of France: Revolution, Revenge and the Search for Louis XVII download ISBN: 1841155888
Author: DEBORAH CADBURY
Publisher: London: Fourth Estate, 2002.; 1st edition (2002)
Language: English
Pages: 352
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Europe
Size MP3: 1966 mb
Size FLAC: 1394 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: doc mbr lrf docx


Deborah Cadbury writes in a style that holds the reader's attention from beginning to end. The terrible suffering endured by that innocent little boy moved me deeply

Deborah Cadbury writes in a style that holds the reader's attention from beginning to end. The terrible suffering endured by that innocent little boy moved me deeply. How could anyone be so cruel to him as those French revolutionaries were? It was one of the worst injustices in history. Unless you've got a heart like a swinging brick, this book will greatly disturb you and upset you. But it does tell it like it was. France was, after all, in total chaos during the revolution.

The Lost King Of Franc. A very fascinating read! ~ The 'Lost King of France' revolves around a time that can be described as a web of heartache, disaster, and destruction for the royal family. In high school, as you learn about the story of the French Revolution- who seems more innocent? The "evil" royal family who squeezes any trace of livelihood from the people, or the people?

Louis-Charles Bourbon enjoyed a charmed early childhood in the gilded palace of Versailles. At the age of four, he became the Dauphin, heir to the most powerful throne in Europe. Yet within five years, he was to lose everything.

Louis-Charles Bourbon enjoyed a charmed early childhood in the gilded palace of Versailles. Drawn into the horror of the French Revolution, his family was incarcerated. Two years later, following the brutal execution of both his parents, the Revolutionary leaders declared Louis XVII was dead. No grave was dug, no monument built to mark his passing. Immediately, rumours spread that the Prince had, in fact, escaped from prison and was still alive.

Two years later, the revolutionary leaders declared Louis XVII dead . Immediately, rumors spread that the prince had, in fact, escaped from prison and was still alive. Louis-Charles, Duc de Normandie, enjoyed a charmed early childhood in the gilded palace of Versailles. At the age of four, he became the dauphin, heir to the most powerful throne in Europe Читать весь отзыв.

A true story of royalty, revolution and mystery - the detective story of the brief life and many possible deaths of Louis XVII, the son of Marie Antoinette. Louis-Charles Bourbon enjoyed a charmed early childhood in the gilded palace of Versailles. Drawn into the horror of the French Revolution, his family was incarcerated and their fate thrust into the hands of the revolutionaries who wished to destroy the Monarchy.

Deborah Cadbury is the award-winning TV science producer for the BBC, including Horizon for which she won an Emmy. She is also the highly- acclaimed author of 'The Feminisation of Nature' and 'The Dinosaur Hunters'. Country of Publication. History & Military.

Written by Deborah Cadbury. Narrated by Hannah Gordon. Drawn into the horror of the French Revolution, his family was incarcerated and their fate thrust into the hands of the revolutionaries who wished to destroy the Monarchy

Author Cadbury, Deborah.

Author Cadbury, Deborah.

The Old Regime and the French Revolution. Translated by Stuart Gilbert. Citizens: A Chronicle of the French Revolution. New York: Vintage Books, 1990. Simpson, Helen, ed. and trans.

London: Fourth Estate, 2002. The Old Regime and the French Revolution. New York: Anchor Books, 1983. Du Broca, М. Interesting Anecdotes of the Heroic Conduct of Women During the French Revolution. Translated from the French. London: H. D. Symonds, 1802. The Waiting City: Paris 1782–88. Being an Abridgement of Louis-Sebastien Mercier’s Le Tableau de Paris Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Sc Company, 1933.

Length: 6 hrs and 52 mins Abridged Audiobook Release date: 09-25-09 Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers Limited.

'This is history as it should be. It is stunningly written, I could not put it down. This is the best account of the French Revolution I have ever read.' Alison Weir, author of 'Henry VIII, King and Court' The fascinating, moving story of the brief life and many possible deaths of Louis XVII, son of Marie-Antoinette. Louis-Charles Bourbon enjoyed a charmed early childhood in the gilded palace of Versailles. At the age of four, he became the Dauphin, heir to the most powerful throne in Europe. Yet within five years, he was to lose everything. Drawn into the horror of the French Revolution, his family was incarcerated. Two years later, following the brutal execution of both his parents, the Revolutionary leaders declared Louis XVII was dead. No grave was dug, no monument built to mark his passing. Immediately, rumours spread that the Prince had, in fact, escaped from prison and was still alive. Others believed that he had been murdered, his heart cut out and preserved as a relic. In time, his older sister, Marie-Therese, who survived the Revolution, was approached by countless 'brothers' who claimed not only his name, but also his inheritance. Several 'Princes' were plausible, but which, if any, was the real Louis-Charles? Deborah Cadbury's 'The Lost King of France' is a moving and dramatic story which conclusively reveals the identity of the young prince who was lost in the tower.
User reviews
FEISKO
The best was the way they kept the ending a surprise and finally outed how and who he really was !
Vichredag
VERY INTERESTING!
Exellent
This book is a truly superbly written historical biography. When I started reading it, I couldn't put it down. Deborah Cadbury writes in a style that holds the reader's attention from beginning to end. The terrible suffering endured by that innocent little boy moved me deeply. How could anyone be so cruel to him as those French revolutionaries were? It was one of the worst injustices in history. Unless you've got a heart like a swinging brick, this book will greatly disturb you and upset you. But it does tell it like it was. France was, after all, in total chaos during the revolution. No one was safe. People in power who were ordering people sent to the guillotine one day could find themselves denounced the next day and sent to the guillotine themselves and no one dare show any sympathy for the cruelly treated little boy in case they were judged to be royalist sympathisers and executed for showing their concern. Perhaps this was the main reason why the boy was allowed to die in such appalling agony. The subject of this book does, however, prove one thing. If there is a God, he certainly doesn't give a damn about any of us, especially suffering little children like Louis Charles.
Yozshujind
In respectful response to Mr. Raynor, I would submit that it was amongst the foremost goals of the French Revolution to remove God from human history and in particular, to destroy the Roman Catholic Church. The cruelty you witnessed in researching this low point in human history is the result of a people who forgot their God. In other words, it does not prove that God does not exist, just that frequently when He is abandoned that evil reigns paramount. The French Revolution, the Russian Revolution, Cambodia and Pol Pot, one can go on. God does not force Himself on anyone and the result of people forgeting Him is a loss of grace. It may be that we are not far from this kind of anarchy again because people have forgotten the source of their sanity, humanity and goodness.-J.M. McMillan
Vushura
The best was the way they kept the ending a surprise and finally outed how and who he really was !
Aria
VERY INTERESTING!
Thorgaginn
This book is a truly superbly written historical biography. When I started reading it, I couldn't put it down. Deborah Cadbury writes in a style that holds the reader's attention from beginning to end. The terrible suffering endured by that innocent little boy moved me deeply. How could anyone be so cruel to him as those French revolutionaries were? It was one of the worst injustices in history. Unless you've got a heart like a swinging brick, this book will greatly disturb you and upset you. But it does tell it like it was. France was, after all, in total chaos during the revolution. No one was safe. People in power who were ordering people sent to the guillotine one day could find themselves denounced the next day and sent to the guillotine themselves and no one dare show any sympathy for the cruelly treated little boy in case they were judged to be royalist sympathisers and executed for showing their concern. Perhaps this was the main reason why the boy was allowed to die in such appalling agony. The subject of this book does, however, prove one thing. If there is a God, he certainly doesn't give a damn about any of us, especially suffering little children like Louis Charles.
In respectful response to Mr. Raynor, I would submit that it was amongst the foremost goals of the French Revolution to remove God from human history and in particular, to destroy the Roman Catholic Church. The cruelty you witnessed in researching this low point in human history is the result of a people who forgot their God. In other words, it does not prove that God does not exist, just that frequently when He is abandoned that evil reigns paramount. The French Revolution, the Russian Revolution, Cambodia and Pol Pot, one can go on. God does not force Himself on anyone and the result of people forgeting Him is a loss of grace. It may be that we are not far from this kind of anarchy again because people have forgotten the source of their sanity, humanity and goodness.-J.M. McMillan