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Free eBook The Guns at Last Light: The War in Western Europe, 1944-1945 (The Liberation Trilogy) download

by Rick Atkinson

Free eBook The Guns at Last Light: The War in Western Europe, 1944-1945 (The Liberation Trilogy) download ISBN: 0805062904
Author: Rick Atkinson
Publisher: Henry Holt and Co.; Volume Three of The Liberation Trilogy edition (May 14, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 896
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Europe
Size MP3: 1432 mb
Size FLAC: 1109 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: lit mobi txt lrf


Super. tkinson writes sensitively, even lyricall. he Guns at Last Light offers an outstanding testament to all .

Super. he Guns at Last Light offers an outstanding testament to all who sacrificed to defeat Hitler's Third Reich. The Louisville Courier-Journal. St. Louis Post-Dispatch. The Guns at Last Light is an important addition to the World War II bookshelf. The Washington Times.

Home Rick Atkinson The Guns at Last Light: The . A Monstrous Blood-Mill. The Bright Day Grew Dark. 29. Victory in Europe, May 8, 1945. A KILLING frost struck England in the middle of May 1944, stunting the plum trees and the berry crops.

Home Rick Atkinson The Guns at Last Light: The War in Western Europe, 1944-1945. The guns at last light . .The Guns at Last Light: The War in Western Europe, 1944-1945, . Stranger still was a persistent drought. Hotels posted admonitions above their bathtubs: The Eighth Army crossed the desert on a pint a day.

Rick Atkinson’s Liberation Trilogy began with the 2002 publication of An Army at Dawn, a Pulitzer . Rarely in war did success and sorrow exclude each other from the battlefield. This book continues Atkinson’s monumental study of the Allied armies in North Africa and Europe.

Rarely in war did success and sorrow exclude each other from the battlefield. There are judgments as to generals.

The War in Western Europe, 1944-1945. Volume Three of the Liberation Trilogy. The magnificent conclusion to Rick Atkinson’s acclaimed Liberation Trilogy about the Allied triumph in Europe during World War II. It is the twentieth century’s unrivaled epic: at a staggering price, the United States and its allies liberated Europe and vanquished Hitler.

The Liberation Trilogy is a series of military history books about the United States' involvement in World War II, written by American author Rick Atkinson and published by Henry Holt & Co. The first volume, An Army at Dawn, won the 2003 Pu. The first volume, An Army at Dawn, won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for History and was a New York Times best seller.

The magnificent conclusion to Rick Atkinson’s acclaimed Liberation Trilogy about the Allied triumph in Europe .

The magnificent conclusion to Rick Atkinson’s acclaimed Liberation Trilogy about the Allied triumph in Europe during World War II. In the first two volumes of his bestselling Liberation Trilogy, Rick Atkinson recounted how the American-led coalition fought through North Africa and Italy to the threshold of victory. Now he tells the most dramatic story of all-the titanic battle for Western Europe.

This book is the magnificent conclusion to Rick Atkinson's acclaimed Liberation Trilogy about the Allied triumph in Europe during World War II. It is the twentieth century's unrivaled epic: at a staggering price. It is the twentieth century's unrivaled epic: at a staggering price, the United States and its allies liberated Europe and vanquished Hitler. Now he tells the most dramatic story of all - the titanic battle for Western Europe.

With great sensitivity, Atkinson conveys the horrible reality of what soldiers had to become to defeat Hitler's Germany.

It's amazing that we managed to beat the Germans considering they had better weapons, better leadership (for much of the war), and their soldiers were war-hardened by the time we finally entered to help save Britain and beyond.

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

The magnificent conclusion to Rick Atkinson's acclaimed Liberation Trilogy about the Allied triumph in Europe during World War II

It is the twentieth century's unrivaled epic: at a staggering price, the United States and its allies liberated Europe and vanquished Hitler. In the first two volumes of his bestselling Liberation Trilogy, Rick Atkinson recounted how the American-led coalition fought through North Africa and Italy to the threshold of victory. Now, in The Guns at Last Light, he tells the most dramatic story of all―the titanic battle for Western Europe.

D-Day marked the commencement of the final campaign of the European war, and Atkinson's riveting account of that bold gamble sets the pace for the masterly narrative that follows. The brutal fight in Normandy, the liberation of Paris, the disaster that was Operation Market Garden, the horrific Battle of the Bulge, and finally the thrust to the heart of the Third Reich―all these historic events and more come alive with a wealth of new material and a mesmerizing cast of characters. Atkinson tells the tale from the perspective of participants at every level, from presidents and generals to war-weary lieutenants and terrified teenage riflemen. When Germany at last surrenders, we understand anew both the devastating cost of this global conflagration and the enormous effort required to win the Allied victory.

With the stirring final volume of this monumental trilogy, Atkinson's accomplishment is manifest. He has produced the definitive chronicle of the war that unshackled a continent and preserved freedom in the West. One of The Washington Post's Top 10 Books of the YearA Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of 2013

User reviews
Dead Samurai
I bought this book because it received a good review in Military Officer Magazine if memory serves and it sat on my shelf for months. I’ve read plenty of WWII military history and wasn’t sure there would be much more to learn at this point but Rick Atkinson has written a very readable account of the last year of the war in Europe from D-Day to the German surrender of the Third Reich. Unbeknownst to me at the time this is the final book of a trilogy with the first book covering the North African invasion, book two is about the Italian campaign.

Atkinson follows the popular style of authors like Cornelius Ryan, Stephen Ambrose, Max Hastings and Ian Kershaw where he tells the story from multiple participants’ viewpoints. It’s a winning technique and builds a narrative the reader can really relate to. Mr. Atkinson presented many interesting nuggets of information that I’d never seen anywhere else such as Reichsmarshall Hermann Goering’s marshal’s baton was “sixteen inches long and encrusted with 640 diamonds, twenty gold eagles, and twenty platinum crosses”. After Goering’s capture it was used as a prop to sell war bonds in the U.S. Guess Goering knew how to accessorize, but that little trifle speaks to the kind of personality he was.

I enjoyed reading this book and have decided to read the other two in reverse order since starting with the third will read the second book “The Day of Battle” next. Highly recommended to WWII buffs everywhere.
Samardenob
My only mistake was reading this first as I couldn't wait to see how Atkinson handled the Bulge and the complexities involved in the final year of the War. Even though I appreciated the first two books more on the basis of new material and perspectives offered, I thought this was a very good ending to my favorite trilogy written on the war. I have read cheers untlesd books in the Bulge which offered much more detail but I appreciated especially his account of Normandy, the breakout across France and the fighting in the Colmar Pocket/S. France. Atkinsons prose is hard to beat and his research is amazingly rich and well-presented. He offers readers a nice uplift from Ambrose (who I also admire highly) without getting too bogged down by unit detail and tactical minutiae (which also can be helpful but in doses or in more technical accounts). I also think Atkinson reaches a very admirable level on dissecting the politics of the war and the friction among Allied partners throughout the whole conflict. He also helps show very clearly the brutal reality of war in addition to the bigger picture about sacrifice and values - how I admire the efforts of my grandfather who served in the Bulge just as he couldn't stand to talk about the experience to most or ever return to Europe. If you are only going to read one book about WWII, I would put this one high (if not the highest) on the list and you will probably pick up the other two and maybe even read then in order as I should have. A true classic!
Venemarr
I was a bit surprised when I went to post this review. There were already a number of reviews on Amazon about this book. Yet I had obtained an advance readers copy several weeks before the official release date of May 14 (my hardback copy was received that same day). I would like to state up front that I have read the whole book from cover to cover. It is an excellent book, with very few factual errors (in my opinion), most of which pertain to the discussion of the concluding phase of the Normandy campaign, e.g. the Mortain counteroffensive. For example, the 1st SS Panzer Division was not late because a shot down fighter bomber crashed on a tank in a defile. They got misoriented, in large part due to the hurried nature of the planning for the German counterattack on the morning of 7 August, and the fact they had to make a night road march in unfamiliar terrain. The 116th Panzer Division did NOT lag back when the attack kicked off, and as a matter of fact made the deepest penetration, with its Panther battalion (2/24 Panzer Regt) reaching Le Mesnil Adelee - where they were destroyed by a counterattack launched by the 119th Infantry Regiment (30th ID) and 3d Armored Division - not 2d Armored Division as Atkinson mentions. The commander of the 116th Panzer Division was relieved by the XLVII Panzer Corps commander because they did not get along personally, and because the German division commander (von Schwerin) was a brillant Terry Allen-like leader with exceptional tactical and leadership skills who built up tremendous espirit de corps within his unit while getting under the skin of his superiors.

Other than that, I did not notice anything in the Normandy section. Nor did I notice anything else that jumped out in the remainder of the book. If I had to score his research, I would give him a 98% at a minimum. Those few errors, in my opinion, result from using dated (German accounts in the immediate post-war period)and not the latest academic scholarship using primary sources. That said, Atkinson's bibliography by itself (selected sources beginning on page 813) is well worth the price of this volume. The book is organized into four parts (each totaling approximately 160 pages), each with three chapters (about 40 - 50 pages apiece).

Part One is entitled "Invasion" and consists of chapters entitled "Invasion," "Lodgment," and "Liberation." Atkinson is a superlative writer who can take a wealth of otherwise meaningless statistics and weave those numbers into meaningful prose. For example, the mind numbing detail involved in carrying out Operation Overlord is fittingly brought to life when Atkinson describes events that NEVER occurred in great detail, e.g. the Allied retaliatory chemical attacks in response to a German chemical or biological strike against the invading armada. The sheer scope of the allied endeavor is driven home when talking about such mundane topics as maps (pp. 23 - 24): "Armed guards from ten cartography depots escorted three thousand tons of maps for D-Day alone, the first of 210 million maps that would be distributed in Europe, most of them printed in five colors. Also into the holds (of ships) went 280,000 hydrographic charts; town plats for the likes of Cherbourg and St. Lo; many of the one million aerial photos of German defenses, snapped from reconnaissance planes flying at twenty-five feet and watercolors depicting the view that landing craft coxswains would have of their beaches...."

PART TWO describes the Post-Cobra and Falaise gap events, e.g. Chapter 4 - Pursuit, Chapter 5 - Against the West Wall, and Chapter 6 - The Implicated Woods. The only complaint, and it is a minor one, is that Atkinson while writing Chapter 8 somehow overlooked a detailed article in World War Two magazine on the 9th Infantry Division's initial foray into the Hurtgen Woods in October 1944. The Germans reinforced their defenses in that sector because they thought they were facing "troops specially trained in forest warfare."

PART THREE resumes the battles on the German frontier before ending with the Rundstedt offensive in the Ardennes with Chapter 7 "The Flutter of Wings," Chapter 8 - "A Winter Shadow," and Chapter 9 - "The Bulge." The fourth and final section details the post-Ardennes fighting as well as the Allied conferences in the last year of the war. The Yalta conference in particular is detailed very effectively. Atkinson is particularly effective in weaving small details into the larger narration (who otherwise would have known that one of the villas occupied by Allied representatives served previously at Rundstedt's headquarters?) I think that Rick Atkinson's work reflects a labor of love as he does not recount events and personalities dispassionately. It is clear that Rick appeared to be as frustrated with the French Army's behavior as Eisenhower following the Normandy invasion nor does the author have much sympathy for Montgomery's perennial "bad boy" behavior resulted from deep seated hubris. That said, this book focuses on the experiences of the American soldier and American armies. Our British and French allies are mentioned only when the narrative demands additional detail along those lines.

As a professional historian, my own take on this story would have involved more discussion along the lines of "battalion X moved from Point B to Point C, sustaining 23 casualties in the process of killing of capturing XX German defenders...." Atkinson brings those events to life with a vivid literary brush that literally almost places the reader at the scene of the action. His research is for the most part impeccable, which translates into ACCURATE dramatic prose.

I am genuinely thankful to the author for making these events accessible and interesting to so many more Americans than academic historians like myself. Mr. Atkinson's Liberation Trilogy represents the penultimate account of the US Army in the Mediterranean and European Theaters during the Second World War. With 29 maps and many photographs, it is well worth the price!

ADDENDUM: Atkinson ends the book not with the final surrender in May 1945, but with a detailed description of the repatriation of American war dead from Europe and the gathering of other American war dead at newly created American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC)cemeteries. I think that this particular approach is a fitting and appropriate way to conclude an outstanding set of books.