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Free eBook Ancient Mesopotamia: Portrait of a Dead Civilization download

by Erica Reiner,A.Leo Oppenheim

Free eBook Ancient Mesopotamia: Portrait of a Dead Civilization download ISBN: 0226631869
Author: Erica Reiner,A.Leo Oppenheim
Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 2nd edition (September 1, 1977)
Language: English
Pages: 445
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Ancient Civilizations
Size MP3: 1751 mb
Size FLAC: 1912 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: lrf lit mobi mbr


-Leonard Cottrell, Book Week

Ancient Mesopotamia: Portrait of a Dead Civilization. To any serious student of Mesopotamian civilization, this is one of the most valuable books ever written. -Leonard Cottrell, Book Week. -Samuel Noah Kramer, Archaeology.

University Of Chicago Press, 1977.

Ancient Mesopotamia: Portrait of a Dead Civilization.

Oppenheim's foundational work Ancient Mesopotamia, Portrait of a Dead .

And that is the problem. I have seldom encountered a book that was so hard to read. It is dry beyond all description. Oppenheim's valuable study, which weighs in at a hefty 433 pages, contains all of these plus fifteen plates, three maps, a Chronology, a Glossary of Names and Terms, and an Index.

Georges Roux's outstanding book on ancient Iraq - which opens my eyes - seems amateurish compared to this one . Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 17 years ago. A. Leo Oppenheim's "Ancient Mesopotamia:Portrait of a Dead Civilization" is one lively read.

Iraq's civilization is interesting for two reasons. From a purely opological point of view, ancient Mesopotamia is by far the oldest civilization on this planet - even older than Egypt.

Since its first publication in 1964, Ancient Mesopotamia has remained the most distinguished presentation of the civilization of Babylonia and Assyria

Since its first publication in 1964, Ancient Mesopotamia has remained the most distinguished presentation of the civilization of Babylonia and Assyria. As a distinguished scholar and linguist who spent more than thirty years studying the cuneiform tablets, Oppenheim offers reader a personal picture of the Mesopotamians of three-thousand years ago. In the first chapter, he provides an overview. In the second chapter, he examines the urbanism, political and social organization, and economical facts in ancient Mesopotamia.

Ancient Mesopotamia-the area now called Iraq-has received less attention than ancient Egypt and other long-extinct . Following Oppenheim's death, Erica Reiner used the author's outline to complete the revisions he had begun.

Ancient Mesopotamia-the area now called Iraq-has received less attention than ancient Egypt and other long-extinct and more spectacular civilizations. But numerous small clay tablets buried in the desert soil for thousands of years make it possible for us to know more about the people of ancient Mesopotamia than any other land in the early Near East.

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Leo Oppenheim's most famous work is Ancient Mesopotamia: Portrait of a Dead Civilization. Glass and glassmaking in ancient Mesopotamia. London: Associated University Presses. Untersuchungen zum babylonischen Mietrecht.

User reviews
Yananoc
A.L. Oppenheim's work is certainly outdated in some respects but his work remains a starting point for any serious student of Assyriology. Those who seek a more recent overview might want to turn to Snell's 'Life in the Ancient Near East', for a review of social life, or Khurt's 'Ancient Near East' for history. Yet two stars given because the importance of this work should not be understated.

But this review is less about Oppenheim's work and more about the University of Chicago's revised 2nd edition (1977). Buyers and sellers beware that a number of these books have significant errors in publishing that make the text impossible to read. After page 48, in the middle of chapter one, the text begins again from page 17 (the introduction). All of the introduction is reprinted as well as all of chapter one up to page 48. Then the text jumps to page 81 and all of pages 49-80 are completely missing.

It was quite frustrating to realize this only after reading the first 48 pages then having to purchase a new copy and throw this edition in the recycling bin.
Yanki
good book
Vivaral
Georges Roux's outstanding book on ancient Iraq - which opens my eyes - seems amateurish compared to this one - probably the single best introduction to ancient Mesopotamia written in the English language.
Iraq's civilization is interesting for two reasons. From a purely archaeological/anthropological point of view, ancient Mesopotamia is by far the oldest civilization on this planet - even older than Egypt. The reasons why there's much less attention to it than to Egypt are the fact that there are so few monumental structures remaining there and the fact that Egypt is closer to the Graeoco-Roman civilization.
The other reason why Iraq's civilization is interesting is its potential importance IN THE FUTURE. With the war's outcome almost certain (truly it's like an Iron Age army crushing a Stone Age one), Iraq's long term prospects are quite good. Sitting on the second largest proven crude oil reserves in the world, Iraq has the potential to wield much influence, like Saudi Arabia.
Useful (but rather short) bibilography and glossary.
Oppenheim regrets not being able to make this book "twice the size of the present one." (p.334) I only regret that this book ISN'T three times as long. If this book isn't flying off the shelves, it should be. Get it before it's too late.
(Warning: This book does not include the Sumerian civilization, as the author makes explicit. For this subject you must turn to Sam N. Kramer.)
Perongafa
Oppenheim's foundational work Ancient Mesopotamia, Portrait of a Dead Civilization, is a detailed account of the civilizations that grew out of Sumeria and set a pattern for all the civilizations that followed in the near east, but that does not mean it is easy to read or that the contents are not out of date. And that is the problem. I have seldom encountered a book that was so hard to read. It is dry beyond all description. It was, no doubt, intended as a scholarly work and not as a popular history, and it no doubt is a scholarly work, but it is so difficult to follow that it is amazing. Here is the first sentence of the first chapter "Early in the fourth millennium BC there occurred in the southwest Asia a phenomenon of lasting importance for the history of man: the appearance in quick secession of a group of culture foci." Ok, so we all know what it says, but the wording isn't something that just jumps to mind.

The book is also badly out of date. It was written in 1964 and a revised edition was published in 1977 from notes completed before the author's death by Erica Reiner. Still, even 1977 was a long time ago (it is now 2011) so 30 plus years is bound to bring new facts to the fore and new ideas about the ancient past into the discussion.

The best thing about the book is the fact that Oppenheim stresses the lack of information we actually have about the ancient past. This lack of information leads to a lot of guesswork, and he is up front about this problem. Few others are. In fact many authors guess about the meaning of the past off of known facts. They go far into the realm of speculation in talking about the past. I have read books discussing the cave paintings of 30,000 years ago and the authors told us that the paintings were religious paintings with tribal significance; however, they can't know that. Oppenheim avoids this type of error and openly discusses how little we actually know about the past, even when we have written text to work off of.

Unfortunately the book could not hold my attention. It is just too hard to read.

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