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Free eBook We As Freemen: Plessy v. Ferguson download

by Keith Weldon Medley

Free eBook We As Freemen: Plessy v. Ferguson download ISBN: 1589801202
Author: Keith Weldon Medley
Publisher: Pelican Publishing (April 30, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 252
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1685 mb
Size FLAC: 1971 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: doc docx rtf docx


In "We as Freemen," Keith Medley uncovers the rich and intriguing history of the personalities who fought for equality 30. .

In "We as Freemen," Keith Medley uncovers the rich and intriguing history of the personalities who fought for equality 30 years after the Civil war ended, but generations before . rulers ended legal discrimination based on skin color. While it adds a human element to Plessy v. Ferguson, with biographies of three of the key players (Homer Plessy, John Ferguson, and Albion Tourgee), "We As Freemen" has a huge number of shortcomings that are hard to ignore. Medley states that Jefferson Davis surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse. This is completely false.

Start by marking We as Freemen: Plessy v. Ferguson as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

We as Freemen captures the imagination of the reader from its wonderfully illustrated cover to the very end . Keith Medley reveals a great deal about the people, organizations,strategies and tactics behind Plessy v. erguson.

We as Freemen captures the imagination of the reader from its wonderfully illustrated cover to the very end; and it just won't let go. Well done! 0. Report.

In June 1892, a thirty-year-old shoemaker named Homer Plessy bought a first-class railway ticket from his native New .

In June 1892, a thirty-year-old shoemaker named Homer Plessy bought a first-class railway ticket from his native New Orleans to Covington, north of Lake Pontchartrain. The two-hour trip had hardly begun when Plessy was arrested and removed from the train. Though Homer Plessy was born a free man of color and enjoyed relative equality while growing up in Reconstruction-era New Orleans, by 1890 he could no longer ride in the same carriage with white passengers. com/?book 1589801202.

New Orleans historian Keith Weldon Medley, author of We As Freemen: Plessy v. Ferguson, The Fight Against Legal Segregation, said the words in Justice Harlan's "Great Dissent" were taken from papers filed with the court by "The Citizen's Committee". The effect of the Plessy ruling was immediate; there were already significant differences in funding for the segregated school system, which continued into the 20th century; states consistently underfunded black schools, providing them with substandard buildings, textbooks, and supplies.

This book documents the untold history of the organizing leading up the Plessy v. Ferguson case.

We as Freemen - Plessy v. Ferguson. by Keith Weldon Medley. 5617237/ref sr 1 1?ie UTF8&qid 1371700930&sr 8-1&keywords we+as+freemen.

Medley is the two-time recipient of the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities' Publishing Initiative Grant.

Figure 8. John H. Medley, Weldon Keith, We as Freemen: Plessy v. This book provided information on the other people involved in the Plessy Case, and also provided many useful images. Meyer, Howard N. The Amendment that Refused to Die: Equality and Justice Deferred.

Essential reading on segregation.

In June 1892, a thirty-year-old shoemaker named Homer Plessy bought a first-class railway ticket from his native New Orleans to Covington, north of Lake Pontchartrain. The two-hour trip had hardly begun when Plessy was arrested and removed from the train. Though Homer Plessy was born a free man of color and enjoyed relative equality while growing up in Reconstruction-era New Orleans, by 1890 he could no longer ride in the same carriage with white passengers. Plessy's act of civil disobedience was designed to test the constitutionality of the Separate Car Act, one of the many Jim Crow laws that threatened the freedoms gained by blacks after the Civil War. This largely forgotten case mandated separate-but-equal treatment and established segregation as the law of the land. It would be fifty-eight years before this ruling was reversed by Brown v. Board of Education. Keith Weldon Medley brings to life the players in this landmark trial, from the crusading black columnist Rodolphe Desdunes and the other members of the Comité des Citoyens to Albion W. Tourgee, the outspoken writer who represented Plessy, to John Ferguson, a reformist carpetbagger who nonetheless felt that he had to judge Plessy guilty.

User reviews
Beardana
Long before Rosa Parks refused the disrespectful order
to go to the back of the bus in Montgomery, Alabama,
came Homer Plessy, the young shoemaker who knew he'd be
arrested for refusing to leave the "whites only" car on
the New Orleans railroad. He refused to go to the
segregated car in order to make the point that the law
was cruel and unjust. A federal case was made of it,
and in the end, the US Supreme Court made segregation
the law of the land for the next 53 years. The high
court ruled that "separate but equal" was fair and
equitable but history has proven there was nothing fair
nor equal about that decision. History also proves
there was no justice in that high court opinion and no
wisdom or sense of human rights residing with the
Justices who issued it.
In "We as Freemen," Keith Medley uncovers the rich and
intriguing history of the personalities who fought for
equality 30 years after the Civil war ended, but
generations before U.S. rulers ended legal
discrimination based on skin color. In carefully
crafted prose, the author is apparently the first
researcher to explore the character, mores and lives of
the long forgotten men of the Comité des Citoyen
(Committee of Citizens) who planned and carried out the
peaceful challenge to Louisiana's Separate Car Act of
1890. Homer Plessy did not suddenly challenge
segregation. In a story well-told, Medley turned up
primary research found in dusty nooks and crannies, and
church, library and cemetery logs around New Orleans,
which is his hometown. He describes the efforts of
businessmen, lawyers, educators, and artisans to stop
segregation from taking hold in the South. They
conducted their campaign while the forces of reaction
were regaining political control after the Civil War.
The Comité aimed "to obtain a United States Supreme
Court ruling preventing states from abolishing the
suffrage and equal access gains of the Reconstruction
period that followed the Civil War."
Medley manages to summon Homer Plessy from the
obscurity Jeremy Irons identifies in his "A People's
History of the Supreme Court" (Penguin: 1999) with new
research that portrays Plessy as a quiet, hardworking
man anxious not to be treated disrespectfully because
of his heritage and skin color.
Like the U.S. Supreme Court's 1857 Dred Scott decision,
which barred slaves and their descendants from
citizenship, the high court's decision in Plessy vs.
Ferguson was demeaning and hurtful to millions of
people. The high court decision in Plessy divided the
population, causing widespread suffering. For this
reason, it is useful to recall the dark side of Supreme
Court history and to appreciate that the Justices are,
for better or worse, political appointees who often
press their own viewpoints, which tend also to
represent the narrow views of the class of politicians
who appoint them. Or as Irons put the Plessy decision
in context, amid growing strife "the Court remained a
bastion of conservatism, earning this banquet toast
from a New York banker in 1895: 'I give you, gentlemen,
the Supreme Court of the United States- -guardian of
the dollar, defender of private property, enemy of
spoliation, sheet anchor of the Republic.' "
In 1857 and again in 1896, the Supreme Court inflicted
upon the public the views of Southern plantation owners
and thuggish ideologues, a tiny but disproportionately
powerful part of the population.
In short order, the Comité "formulated legal strategy
while raising money from the neighborhoods of New
Orleans, small towns throughout the South, and in
cities as far away as Washington D.C. and San
Francisco" and published their views in the African-
American daily, The Crusader. Medley documents the
heroic role of The Crusader in the battle for human
rights in the humid South. The Comité held popular
rallies, and did all anyone can do within democratic
structures to organize resistance to the dark era of
ignorance spreading through the legislatures, town
halls and courtrooms controlled by rich white American
men across the South. (Women would wait another
generation to win the right to vote.) And, it would be
more than five long decades before the wrongs of the
high court's Plessy decision would be reversed, in part
due to arguments put forward by then lawyer Thurgood
Marshall to the high court sitting in 1954. Marshall
argued the case in conjunction with the re-awakening
across the land of the persistent struggle for Civil
Rights.
I highly recommend Keith Medley's "We as Freemen" and I
particularly like that he was able to locate
photographs portraying those who fought bravely but
lost a key round in the struggle for human rights.
VizoRRR
If you want to understand how all the civil rights gained by African Americans in the immediate post-Civil War era were stripped away by determined Southern Democrats, you have to read this book. It is primarily the story of how a 'test case' brought before the US Supreme Court back-fired and paved the way for the 'Jim Crow' oppression of Blacks for another fifty years. The author's style is engaging and the result is a real historical page turner.
INwhite
This book should be taught in schools. Fascinating story of a fascinating time, with repercussions to today.
Bragis
Keith Weldon Medley brings history to life in a interesting, informative and very readable way. The book should be a
"must read" for every high school and college student.
Delirium
good
Shadowredeemer
This was one of the best books I have read. The writng was clear and substantive. As an attorney, the hisory behind Plessy was most appreciated.
Reighbyra
This book provides an interesting perspective on the case and the early Civil Rights Movement.
A few thoughts on this book...

While it adds a human element to Plessy v. Ferguson, with biographies of three of the key players (Homer Plessy, John Ferguson, and Albion Tourgee), "We As Freemen" has a huge number of shortcomings that are hard to ignore.

- Medley states that Jefferson Davis surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse. This is completely false. General Robert E. Lee surrendered to General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox. Jefferson Davis and his Confederate cabinet fled Virginia and were captured a month later in Georgia.
Perhaps it is just a simple mistake...but that one simple mistake throws the entire book into doubt.

- Medley seems to be hung up on the fact that one of Homer Plessy's jobs was that of a shoemaker. He mentions it through most of the book, even calling him "Shoemaker Plessy" at various points. Towards the end, he bemoans the factory process of making shoes, thus reducing Plessy to a cobbler, repairing shoes.
What significance is this? If the point is that Homer Plessy was an average everyman, then yes it does fit...but you only need to mention it once.
Homer Plessy is not Imelda Marcos for crying out loud.

This book needs an overhaul ASAP. Mr. Medley, if you're reading this, I urge you to submit it to a professional editor.