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Free eBook Unknown Shore: The Lost History of England's Arctic Colony download

by Robert Ruby

Free eBook Unknown Shore: The Lost History of England's Arctic Colony download ISBN: 0805052151
Author: Robert Ruby
Publisher: Henry Holt and Co.; 1st edition (June 12, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 320
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1374 mb
Size FLAC: 1887 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: txt doc lrf mobi


England's first attempt at colonizing the New World was not at Roanoke or Jamestown, but on a mostly frozen small island in the Canadian Arctic. Queen Elizabeth I called that place Meta Incognita - the Unknown Shore.

England's first attempt at colonizing the New World was not at Roanoke or Jamestown, but on a mostly frozen small island in the Canadian Arctic.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Unknown Shore: The Lost History of England's Arctic Colony as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Ruby, Robert (Robert Steven). Frobisher, Martin, Sir, approximately 1535-1594, Hall, Charles Francis, 1821-1871, Explorers. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on August 25, 2015.

The true story of how the first English colony in the New World was lost to history, then found again three hundred years later.

Author:Ruby, Robert H. All of our paper waste is recycled within the UK and turned into corrugated cardboard. World of Books USA was founded in 2005. Book Condition:VERYGOOD. The true story of how the first English colony in the New World was lost to history, then found again three hundred years later. England's first attempt at colonizing the New World was not at Roanoke or Jamestown, but on a mostly frozen small island in the Canadian Arctic.

It was these stories that unlocked the mystery of Frobisher's lost colony.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. It was these stories that unlocked the mystery of Frobisher's lost colony. Ultimately, it is a tale of men driven by greed and ambition, of the hard labor of exploration, of the Inuit and their land, and of great gambles gone wrong. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Here is the true story of how the first European colony in the New World was lost to history, then found again three hundred years later.

of England's Arctic Colony.

The Lost History of England's Arctic Colony. In this brilliantly conceived dual narrative, Robert Ruby interweaves Frobisher's saga with that of the nineteenth-century American Charles Francis Hall, whose explorations of this same landscape enabled him to hear the oral history of the Inuit, passed down through generations. Ultimately, it is a tale of men driven by greed and ambition, of the hard labor of exploration, of th. ore.

The stone returned to England, where its glittering surface piqued the curiosity of many a courtier - might it contain gold? .

The stone returned to England, where its glittering surface piqued the curiosity of many a courtier - might it contain gold? Martin Frobisher would find out, and with the backing of private investors and the Queen's Privy Council, returned in force equipped to mine the black stone in great quantities, and establish her Majesty's first settlement in the New World, in a land the Queen dubbed "Meta Incognita" - the "unknown shore

Ruby discussed his book, Unknown Shore: The Lost History of England’s Arctic Colony, published by Henry Holt and Company.

Ruby discussed his book, Unknown Shore: The Lost History of England’s Arctic Colony, published by Henry Holt and Company. Through the work of the nineteenth-century American explorer, Charles Francis Hall and Ruby’s own travels to the Canadian Arctic, the book presents the little-known history of pirate Martin Forbisher’s colonization of Baffin Island and the impact it had on the people who lived there. Mr. Ruby read from his book and took questions from the audience.

The true story of how the first English colony in the New World was lost to history, then found again three hundred years later.England's first attempt at colonizing the New World was not at Roanoke or Jamestown, but on a mostly frozen small island in the Canadian Arctic. Queen Elizabeth I called that place Meta Incognita -- the Unknown Shore. Backed by Elizabeth I and her key advisors, including the legary spymaster Sir Francis Walsingham and the shadowy Dr. John Dee, the erstwhile pirate Sir Martin Frobisher set out three times across the North Atlantic, in the process leading what is still the largest Arctic expedition in history. In this forbidding place, Frobisher believed he had discovered vast quantities of gold, the fabled Northwest Passage to the riches of Cathay, and a suitable place for a year-round colony. But Frobisher's dream turned into a nightmare, and his colony was lost to history for nearly three centuries.In this brilliantly conceived dual narrative, Robert Ruby interweaves Frobisher's saga with that of the nineteenth-century American Charles Francis Hall, whose explorations of this same landscape enabled him to hear the oral history of the Inuit, passed down through generations. It was these stories that unlocked the mystery of Frobisher's lost colony.Unknown Shore is the story of two men's travels, and of what these men shared three centuries apart. Ultimately, it is a tale of men driven by greed and ambition, of the hard labor of exploration, of the Inuit and their land, and of great gambles gone wrong.
User reviews
Flash_back
This was an interesting book about a bit of history I knew little about. Like the territory it describes, however, it's a little sparse. I waited for the narrative to reach an apex, which it never did. In many ways, the storytelling follows the contours of the history, which itself was pretty anticlimatic.

But I enjoyed reading it, and would recommend it to others.
Grarana
I was very interested in Frobisher Air Base now Iqaluit Airport. My interest centered around the part it played in the US nuclear war plans, early warning, communications and strategic location during the 80s and 90s. First I needed to learn about the history of the area and exploration. Unknown Shore provided that first glimpse of early life and exploration. The cast of characters and the way their names became geographic locations are explained to a lesser degree though. If you like reading about remote and harsh areas of the world you will like this book. It could use a few more maps and pictures but I say that for every book I read.
Peles
The author did a lot of research. From the examples of 1500s handwriting - I can imagine that it took a while to figure out what the handwritten words are. The book is really a three part story- that of Frobisher, that of Hall and that of the modern Inuit. Author does a good job in weaving it all together.
Moonworm
Perfect!
Kelerana
Robert Ruby's Unknown Shore is a little misleading in its subtitle (The Lost History of England's Arctic Colony) in as much as the history was not quite lost nor was there actually a colony, only the briefest of attempts at a colony in a farcical plan to mine the soil for gold. That said, the book is quite entertaining as it pieces together the story of Martin Frobisher and his ill-fated Elizabethean Arctic adventures and the always fascinating Charles Francis Hall's discovery of the location of Frobisher's Meta Incognita in the nineteenth century. (For a wonderful and full account of Hall, see the very fine Weird and Tragic Shores by C. Chauncey Loomis). The two stories blend fairly well and the author keeps the narrative sparkling along at an entertaining clip. This was a good Arctic read for those addicted to these books and a good place to begin for someone who wants to learn what the addiction to these Arctic books is all about from a book that shows men whose addiction to that cold world ran so much deeper than merely reading about it.
Moogura
[...]

The polar universes are often and inexpressibly vague and mythological. Perhaps that's why for such a number of years they held such heightened scrutiny for would-be explorers scraping across Earth's final frontiers. What is strange, however, is Ruby's account of two parallel arctic explorations three centuries apart make the arctic seem more desirous than the New World (southern edition) in the High Renaissance or industrializing America much later. Martin Frobisher and Charles Francis Hall serve the book-ends of Ruby's narrative, who are quite expertly shown as different men first and different explorers last. Both are in searches for something, which Ruby thankfully shows us is really themselves. Frobisher, under the weight of reaching a passage to Cathay and then loading the coffers of Renaissance England with alchemic "black ore" is really a man sprawling in the turmoil of playing second fiddle. Hall, on the other hand, seeks the arctic not for wealth but for recognition, not of personal exploits, but of playing hero to a group of men already blown to dust by the arctic frost. One wonders if Hall had found Franklin's men if he would have truly enjoyed their revelation to the modern world. Ruby makes him certainly romantic enough to try.

As the polar regions receive more and more attention in the upcoming years for their destruction instead of their frontier merit, books like Ruby's are key to remembering that the arctic is more than a melting smeer on the coattails of global warming. Indeed, places like Frobisher's Bay and Baffin Island need to be rediscovered for not only their natural beauty but human intersection. Thus, in a way, Ruby writes an environmental history that though steeping in Occidental superiorities seeks to undermine the concept that man has never truly inhabited one of the coldest places on earth. Truly, the Inuit are the heroes of this narrative, which is easy to feel as one by one they drop to death as soon as they butt up against European or American households. On a more speculative note, Ruby inadvertently, or maybe a little overtly, tells us that to each section of the earth is a set of men, and that set is limited. It's nice at the end of the day to still believe that nature can win. Ruby makes us believe for a couple hundred of pages that this is still true.
Flamehammer
This is an OK read about the Arctic. There are actually two stories here. The first revolves around English explorer and pirate Martin Forbisher and the second about an American Charles Francis Hall. Forbisher was searching for the northwest passage to China and found what he thought was a passage way and a black stone. Assayers felt the stone could yield a fortune in gold. The passage Forbisher found was a bay and the stone contained little in the way of precious metals. Hall searched for the survivors of an earlier Artic expedition of Franklin. He was disappointed too. What he found were the traces of Forbisher's expedition. Both explorers searched for something that was not there.

The book is of interest to those historians who like the explorations of the Arctic and Antarctic. What is facinating is the life of the Inuit or native peoples who inhabit this inhospital land. It was interesting to read of how these people adapted to their environment. The white man may have thought them savages. They were far more civilized than the white man. As stated an OK read about a little known expedition.