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Free eBook Frederick Douglass : Autobiographies : Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave / My Bondage and My Freedom / Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (Library of America) download

by Henry Louis Gates,Frederick Douglass

Free eBook Frederick Douglass : Autobiographies : Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave / My Bondage and My Freedom / Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (Library of America) download ISBN: 0940450798
Author: Henry Louis Gates,Frederick Douglass
Publisher: Library of America (February 1, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 1100
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1805 mb
Size FLAC: 1476 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: docx lrf lrf azw


Douglass thought it gossly unfair that black Union troops were getting paid less than whites Douglass spent his first 20 years of life as a slave and was totally self-educated

Douglass thought it gossly unfair that black Union troops were getting paid less than whites. He went to the White House and managed to meet Lincoln in private to present his argument. They became friends and, to my knowledge, he was the first black man to be invited to the White House for a social engagement. Douglass spent his first 20 years of life as a slave and was totally self-educated. He purchased his freedom (with some financial assistace) and wrote two best selling autobiographies before the age of 20.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass is an 1845 memoir and treatise on abolition written by famous orator and former slave Frederick Douglass during his time in Lynn, Massachusetts

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass is an 1845 memoir and treatise on abolition written by famous orator and former slave Frederick Douglass during his time in Lynn, Massachusetts. It is generally held to be the most famous of a number of narratives written by former slaves during the same period

Douglass (Library of America) .

Frederick Douglass : Autobiographies : Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave My Bondage and My Freedom Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (Library of America). 2208 Pages · 1994 · . 3 MB · 672 Downloads ·English. Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future. increase America's talent pool by vastly improving K-12 mathematics and science education; sustain.

Frederick Douglass, 1818-1895. Funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities supported the electronic publication of this title. Call number E 449 D746 1845 (Murrey Atkins Library, UNC-Charlotte).

My Bondage and My Freedom is an autobiographical slave narrative written by Frederick Douglass and published in 1855

My Bondage and My Freedom is an autobiographical slave narrative written by Frederick Douglass and published in 1855. It is the second of three autobiographies written by Douglass, and is mainly an expansion of his first (Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass), discussing in greater detail his transition from bondage to liberty. Following this liberation, Douglass, a former slave, went on to become a prominent Abolitionist, speaker, author, and publisher.

Born a slave, Frederick Douglass educated himself, escaped, and made himself one of the greatest leaders in American history

Born a slave, Frederick Douglass educated himself, escaped, and made himself one of the greatest leaders in American history. Here in this Library of America volume are collected his three autobiographical narratives, now recognized as classics of both American history and American literature. Writing with the eloquence and fierce intelligence that made him a brilliantly effectiv Born a slave, Frederick Douglass educated himself, escaped, and made himself one of the greatest leaders in American history

On February 20, 1895, Frederick Douglass died of a heart attack 1855 His second autobiography, My Bondage and My Freedom, is published

On February 20, 1895, Frederick Douglass died of a heart attack. His death triggered an outpouring of grief and mourning; black schools in Washington, . closed for a day, and thousands of children were taken to the Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church to view his open casket. 1855 His second autobiography, My Bondage and My Freedom, is published. 1859 Abolitionist John Brown tries to enlist Douglass’s support in a raid to liberate slaves at Harpers Ferry, Virginia (now West Virginia); Douglass refuses, believing it to be a doomed effort. On October 16 Brown goes through with his raid and is caught; he is later tried and hanged for treason.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845), published seven years after his escape . The book also incorporates extracts from Douglass’s speeches, including the searing What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845), published seven years after his escape, was written in part as a response to skeptics who refused to believe that so articulate an orator could ever have been a slave. The book also incorporates extracts from Douglass’s speeches, including the searing What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?

Douglass) Frederick Douglass (1818–1895) was an African-American . My Bondage and My Freedom.

My Bondage and My Freedom (1855) shows the inspiring manner in which Frederick Douglass transforms himself from slave to fugitive to one of the most powerful voices to emerge from the American civil rights movement, leaving behind a legacy of social, intellectual, and political thought. Excerpt: I was born in Tuckahoe, near Hillsborough, and about twelve miles from Easton, in Talbot county, Maryland. The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass) Frederick Douglass (1818–1895) was an African-American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman.

One of the defining autobiographies of American history, the Narrative (1845) tells the life story of Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), who was born into slavery in Maryland and escaped it in 1838 to become the premier abolitionist, orator, and social justice agitator of 19th-century.

One of the defining autobiographies of American history, the Narrative (1845) tells the life story of Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), who was born into slavery in Maryland and escaped it in 1838 to become the premier abolitionist, orator, and social justice agitator of 19th-century America. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave: Chapter 1" Track Info. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave Frederick Douglass. 1. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave: Preface.

Henry Louis Gates, Jr. presents the only authoritative edition of all three autobiographies by the escaped slave who became a great American leader.Here in this Library of America volume are collected Frederick Douglass's three autobiographical narratives, now recognized as classics of both American history and American literature. Writing with the eloquence and fierce intelligence that made him a brilliantly effective spokesman for the abolition of slavery and equal rights, Douglass shapes an inspiring vision of self-realization in the face of monumental odds.Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845), published seven years after his escape, was written in part as a response to skeptics who refused to believe that so articulate an orator could ever have been a slave. A powerfully compressed account of the cruelty and oppression of the Maryland plantation culture into which Douglass was born, it brought him to the forefront of the anti-slavery movement and drew thousands, black and white, to the cause.In My Bondage and My Freedom (1855), Douglass expands the account of his slave years. With astonishing psychological penetration, he probes the painful ambiguities and subtly corrosive effects of black-white relations under slavery, and recounts his determined resistance to segregation in the North. The book also incorporates extracts from Douglass’s speeches, including the searing “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?”Life and Times, first published in 1881, records Douglass’s efforts to keep alive the struggle for racial equality udirng Reconstruction. John Brown, Abraham Lincoln, William Lloyd Garrison, and Harriet Beecher Stowe all feature prominently in this chronicle of a crucial epoch in American history. The revised edition of 1893, presented here, includes an account of his controversial diplomatic mission to Haiti.This volume contains a detailed chronology of Douglass’s life, notes providing further background on the events and people mentioned, and an account of the textual history of each of the autobiographies.LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation’s literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America’s best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.
User reviews
Buriwield
Absolutely a must read! No movie i've seen has ever portrayed what this man and too many others experienced during the days of American slavery. Slavery has been and always will be as long as man inhabits the earth, for man is fallen and naturally bent toward power and sin. His life story is heart wrenching, and yet enlightening. It is encouraging that the days have passed where the practice of enslaving people stolen from their own nation has passed, and yet, we've grievous morphed the word "slavery to "trafficking" and so, "slavery" continues under an less familiar word, in full force, practically unnoticed by the typical American. We may actually find (don't have the stats) that it is equal to or even more widespread than the 17-1800's slave trade. Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey (Douglas) was born into slavery in Maryland. Having read only his first book "Narrative of the Life of FD" i can't wait to finish the rest. The thought of being free never left him, and he was one day able to make his thoughts a reality. His hard work and wise ways gave him the tools for escape. He self educated in any and every way possible. When free, he fearlessly became active in speaking out against the atrocity of slavery in a time where abolitionists were fearful to speak the truth. He gives an honest and appropriate shaming of those who call themselves "Christian" and yet performed some of the most egregious atrocities on their fellow men and women. [ The Bible tells us that we were created equal, and "we are all one blood." It tells us that we are all descendants of Noah... so, from the same family!!! But mans heart is desperately wicked.] Frederick was wise enough to see the difference of the Biblical truth and freedom that Christ teaches from the pseudo christianity that so many practice. Wisely he didn't let others keep him from knowing the real Christ. Being human, all of us lower ourselves to different degrees at times when we are too far from the One who makes us whole. His writing is incredible. A hero for truth. Oh that it would be read far and wide. He reached for the stars and let no hurdle stand in the way. This is what Frederick did, and many others who lived to tell their story! It's a reminder to pray for my fellow brothers/sisters who are still in bondage today! Real freedom is through Christ Jesus, and then from this worlds bondage. He apparently sought and found both!
Ygglune
.. . if I've never read this book, I always have the so called black race in my thoughts for they suffered the same pain we so called Mexicans did.. Fred Douglas inspires to self educate yourselves in every way according to reality, because that's what will help us survive through kingdoms that don't belong to us..
Gadar
Absolutely exceptional! The truly amazing life of Frederick Douglas is told through three autobiographies. Though they overlap and duplicate the telling of his early life in slavery, it was helpful to read them in sequence to see the maturing in literary competency, the fuller detail of events, and the most important aspects of his abolitionist activities and thinking. The included speeches and public addresses add so much more to the understanding of the man. This is history ALL Americans should know. I welcome this, another title in the Library of America series of "must read" great titles, expertly printed and bound, precious in the holding and so rich in thought.
Zan
President Lincoln regarded Douglass as "one of the most meritorious men, if not the most meritorious man, in the United States". Douglass thought it gossly unfair that black Union troops were getting paid less than whites. He went to the White House and managed to meet Lincoln in private to present his argument. Lincoln agreed and told Douglass that he would sign any executive order and any other documents necessary to assure that it would be done. They became friends and, to my knowledge, he was the first black man to be invited to the White House for a social engagement. He attended the evening celebration at the White House followng Lincoln's second inaugural.

Douglass spent his first 20 years of life as a slave and was totally self-educated. He purchased his freedom (with some financial assistace) and wrote two best selling autobiographies before the age of 20. Thereafter, etited his own newspaper and gave brilliant orations in the days when great orators were famous.

Douglass's home overlooking Washington is now an historic landmark open to the public. As an old man he sat in his rocker on the front porch and greeted an endless string of young black men asking him how they could further the civil rights movement. His only advice was to "agitate", "agitate" and "agitate".

As a kid I recollect walking around with an "I Like Ike" sign. Winston Churchill was around then and was occasionally interviewd. Eleanor Roosevent was a driving force in Adlai Sevenson's presidential campaign. We kids thought her voice was very strange. The only name for niggers was niggers, who lagged closely behind Jews and Catholics in the society from which I came.

It's amazingly wonderful how much society has changed during my own lifetime. Diversity is America. But it seems to me that 20th century historians writing about the civil rights movement are negligent, at best, by marginalizing, and even overlooking, the sublime accomplishments of Frederick Douglass, the man voted by President Lincoln as the most meritorious man in the United States.
Quendant
I am almost finish with this book and I must say that it is gripping! The harshness that Frederick Douglass was witness to, the struggle to be recognized as a man, to get an education. This is a must read if you would like to learn more about America's treatment of slaves and blacks in general. As an American veteran, this kind of history means so much to me. I am also doing lots of reading about the origins of all people who came to this country and to broaden your horizon I would invite you to do the same.
Wrathmaster
This should be on every American's reading list. Douglas was a great man, a great American and a great Republican. He is also a fine and compelling writer.
Felolv
This is one of the most important autobiographies in American history. It is as relevant now as it was when it was first written. It should be read by all Americans, particularly those who need to learn that bigotry and racism are absolutely wrong.