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Free eBook Flapper: A Madcap Story of Sex, Style, Celebrity, and the Women Who Made America Modern download

by Joshua Zeitz

Free eBook Flapper: A Madcap Story of Sex, Style, Celebrity, and the Women Who Made America Modern download ISBN: 1400080541
Author: Joshua Zeitz
Publisher: Broadway Books; Reprint edition (February 6, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 352
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1759 mb
Size FLAC: 1446 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: lrf doc mbr docx


Blithely flinging aside the Victorian manners that kept her disapproving mother corseted, the New Woman of the 1920s puffed cigarettes, snuck gin, hiked her hemlines, danced the Charleston, and necked in roadsters. More important, she earned her own keep, controlled her own destiny, and secured liberties that modern women take for granted.

The story didn’t end happily ever after. Joshua zeitz series: Building the Great Society. Other author's books: Flapper: A Madcap Story of Sex, Style, Celebrity & the Women Who Made America Modern. Two years later, as America made a fateful break with its isolationist heritage and sent the first round of doughboys off to the Great War, Eugenia Kelly quietly inherited her fortune. Before the 1920s were out, she and Al Davis had divorced. By then, nobody cared.

X, 338 pages : 24 cm. Blithely flinging aside the Victorian manners that kept her disapproving mother corseted, the New Woman of the 1920s puffed cigarettes, snuck gin, hiked her hemlines, danced the Charleston. Blithely flinging aside the Victorian manners that kept her disapproving mother corseted, the New Woman of the 1920s puffed cigarettes, snuck gin, hiked her hemlines, danced the Charleston, and necked in roadsters. Her newfound freedom heralded a radical change in American culture.

Flapper is a dazzling look at the women who heralded a radical change in American culture and launched the first . Joshua Zeitz has taught American history and politics at Cambridge University, Harvard University, and Princeton University.

Flapper is a dazzling look at the women who heralded a radical change in American culture and launched the first truly modern decade. The New Woman of the 1920s puffed cigarettes, snuck gin, hiked her hemlines, danced the Charleston, and necked in roadsters. Flapper is an inside look at the 1920s.

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Flapper" sees this style shift as something much more meaningful than a. .

Flapper" sees this style shift as something much more meaningful than a fashion trend - although it points to the way a slim new clothing silhouette led to an obsession with weight loss that was then ne. Zeitz is most interesting when he regards the flapper as a business phenomenon, an early example of girlish tastes manipulated by commercial interests. The pioneer merchants of cool invented the flapper for fun, for profit and for fame," he writes. But it's in its very overload of stories that "Flapper" finds its liveliest moments, and Zeitz truly captures the chaotic spirit of the age. Continue reading the main story. We’re interested in your feedback on this page.

As Joshua M. Zeitz writes in Flapper: A Madcap Story of Sex, Style, Celebrity and the Women Who Made America Modern, flapper fashion wouldn’t have been complete without the creeping hemline. Zeitz writes in Flapper: A Madcap Story of Sex, Style, Celebrity and the Women Who Made America Modern, flapper fashion wouldn’t have been complete without the creeping hemline, which by 1925 or 1936 reached a shocking height of 14 inches above the ground. Sheer stockings, sometimes even rolled below the knees, completed the scandalous look.

The men and women who made the flapper were a diverse lot. There was Coco Chanel, the French orphan who redefined the feminine form and silhouette, helping to free women from the torturous corsets and crinolines that had served as tools of social control. Three thousand miles away, Lois Long, the daughter of a Connecticut clergyman, christened herself "Lipstick" and gave New Yorker readers a thrilling entree into Manhattan's extravagant Jazz Age nightlife.

American born Joshua Zeitz is a lecturer on American History and Fellow of Pembroke College at the . Zeitz, an American who holds a chair at Cambridge University in England, brings the 20s to life through his story of these "madcap" women.

Zeitz, an American who holds a chair at Cambridge University in England, brings the 20s to life through his story of these "madcap" women.

Flapper is a dazzling look at the women who heralded a radical change in American culture and launched the first truly modern decade.The New Woman of the 1920s puffed cigarettes, snuck gin, hiked her hemlines, danced the Charleston, and necked in roadsters. More important, she earned her own keep, controlled her own destiny, and secured liberties that modern women take for granted.Flapper is an inside look at the 1920s. With tales of Coco Chanel, the French orphan who redefined the feminine form; Lois Long, the woman who christened herself “Lipstick” and gave New Yorker readers a thrilling entrée into Manhattan’s extravagant Jazz Age nightlife; three of America’s first celebrities: Clara Bow, Colleen Moore, and Louise Brooks; Dallas-born fashion artist Gordon Conway; Zelda and Scott Fitzgerald, whose swift ascent and spectacular fall embodied the glamour and excess of the era; and more, this is the story of America’s first sexual revolution, its first merchants of cool, its first celebrities, and its most sparkling advertisement for the right to pursue happiness.Whisking us from the Alabama country club where Zelda Sayre first caught the eye of F. Scott Fitzgerald to Muncie, Indiana, where would-be flappers begged their mothers for silk stockings, to the Manhattan speakeasies where patrons partied till daybreak, historian Joshua Zeitz brings the 1920s to exhilarating life.
User reviews
Kemath
Sex, booze, and jazz. For those of you who are fans of the new “Z: The Beginning of Everything” Amazon show with Christina Ricci, I want to highly recommend Joshua Zeitz’s non-fiction book, “Flapper: A Madcap Story of Sex, Style, Celebrity, and the Women Who Made America Modern”. Zeitz is an historian and has taught American history and politics at Cambridge, Harvard, and Princeton. He is also the author of several books on American political and social history.

"Flapper" spotlights the history of the Jazz Age while zeroing in on the conception of the ever-alluring flapper subculture. The book includes a look into Coco Channel’s rise to fame through her fashion empire, the Hollywood flapper starlets of the era, and the formation of the infamous Madison Avenue, whose executives helped propel the flappers' glamorous look. One of my favorite parts of the book is the interweaving of F. Scott Fitzgerald ("The Great Gatsby") and Zelda Fitzgerald's lives. They truly were the wild "it" couple of the Jazz Age and Zeitz partially credits the couple with birthing the flapper persona.

I'd expect that many Americans probably would guess that the first counter-culture movement wasn’t until the 1960s. Zeitz however, pinpoints an earlier revolution in the response from Jazz-Age youth who were fed up with imposed Victorian ideals. Flappers bucked that system and were the female rebels of their time. However, the flapper subculture was short-lived and ultimately collapsed under the onset of the Depression.

In conclusion, there are many non-fiction books that can become repetitive and bogged down with vocabulary. Zeitz’s work is fresh and his information and ability to weave a storylined plot through an historical narrative – which I don’t see often – kept me turning the pages. Definitely a great read, and if you haven’t seen "Z: The Beginning of Everything", I highly recommend it. Christina Ricci has literally become Zelda Fitzgerald's reincarnate. Fantastic acting. And, Joshua Zeitz, if you are reading this, when is your next book coming out? Please say it's about the history of Victorian America.
Flower
I've always been interested in the era of the flapper so this was a fun book to read. The young people of the 1920's were the first generation to be able to take full advantage of things that teens of today take for granted like movie theaters, radios, amusement parks, dance halls, telephones, vehicles etc, which completely changed the ways in which people thought and behaved. For example, the vehicle changed the Victorian rules of courtship by allowing young people to venture off alone instead of being close to home under the watchful eyes of nosy parents. Electricity was also a lot more common in this era (2/3 of households had it by the mid 20's) so this meant that people had more time on their hands for entertainment purposes since they didn't have to stay home all day cleaning and preserving foods the hard way like they did before electric vacuums, washers, and refrigeration. Aside from the inventions that caused a culture shift in the 1920, the book also talks about the people such as Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, Coco Chanel, Clara Bow, Colleen Moore, and Louise Brooks who influenced the generation.
I really liked the historical aspect of the book that discussed the shift from Victorian to flapper values and I wished that part had been longer since it was very interesting. However,I felt like there was way too much information about the lives of the celebrities and that part kind of took over the majority of the book. All in all though, I felt like I learned a lot and I would recommend it to anyone who enjoys the 1920's.
Quellik
Loved the historical portions of the book. Would have rated four stars but I disliked the political editorializing that would pop up at times. The author certainly is entitled to his opinion. Unfortunately his opinions are the same liberal nattering you can find everywhere else. It wasn't necessary and it was distracting.
Funky
A fun and interesting read about the changing roles and expectations of women between 1880 and 1940, though it probably exaggerates the influence of flappers on the mass of American women. (Sort of reminded me of articles about the 60's that leave the impression everyone was a hippie at Woodstock or Haight-Asbury.) I particularly enjoyed small factoids such as the impact of electric street lighting on changing nighttime social activity and "dating." Definitely recommend this very enjoyable book.
Silver Globol
Outstanding social history that highlights the extent of just how profound the changes were in American society. I also appreciated being reminded of the notion that in some parts of the country, the 20s did not roar, which foretold the dichotomies of today: Bi-coastal, urban America experimenting with new ideas and trends v. the more traditional and hide-bound areas of the rural hinterlands. And as the author reminds us, the party of the decade gave way to the painful hangover post-1929. Read in conjunction with Judith Mackrell's Flappers: Six Women of a Dangerous Generation, this book will provide a comprehensive treatment of one of America's most interesting decades.
Crazy
I ordered this book because it was on a list of approved books I had to choose from for an assignment. I'm glad I chose it. What an amazing read! The author did a superb job of incorporating different aspects of history together to bring the bigger picture of the flapper to light. I couldn't put this book down! If you're interested in cultural history, particularly women's history, this will keep you entertained the entire time.