» » Land of The Burnt Thigh: A Lively Story of Women Homesteaders On The South Dakota Frontier (Borealis Books)

Free eBook Land of The Burnt Thigh: A Lively Story of Women Homesteaders On The South Dakota Frontier (Borealis Books) download

by Edith E. Kohl,Stephen J. Voorhies,Glenda Riley

Free eBook Land of The Burnt Thigh: A Lively Story of Women Homesteaders On The South Dakota Frontier (Borealis Books) download ISBN: 0873511999
Author: Edith E. Kohl,Stephen J. Voorhies,Glenda Riley
Publisher: Minnesota Historical Society Press (1986)
Language: English
Pages: 332
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1121 mb
Size FLAC: 1231 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: txt doc lrf rtf


I'm a South Dakotan, and somewhat familiar with the area, and I can attest that the land we "saved" for the Sioux reservations was not land we wanted, but land that was difficult to farm and to make a living upon.

Kohl has told this story of South Dakota with a simplicity, a directness, and an understanding of its quietly heroic element which make her book an appealing as well as a significant contribution to the latter-day history of the pioneers. For information, write to the Minnesota Historical Society Press, 345 Kellogg Blvd. St. Paul, MN 55102–1906.

This book, written in 1938, tells the story of another type of pioneer homesteader. This explains the title, as this area was called the Land Of The Burnt Thigh. The people who went into South Dakota during the early 1900's. I must have missed this topic in my school history classes. A fire in which three young Sioux managed to survive, but were left with burns on their legs, which earned the area its name.

A Lively Story of Women Homesteaders on the South Dakota Frontier. A fascinating memoir of homesteading in South Dakota in the early twentieth century. Category: Frontier History Women's Studies.

Books related to Land of The Burnt Thigh. Books related to Land of The Burnt Thigh.

This is an unusual record, well worth reading. Kohl has told this story of South Dakota with a simplicity, a directness, and an understanding of its quietly heroic element which make her book an appealing as well as a significant contribution to the latter-day history of the pioneers. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Land of The Burnt Thigh: A Lively Story of Women Homesteaders On The South Dakota Frontier (Borealis Books). What others are saying. Land of The Burnt Thigh: A Lively Story of Women Homesteaders On The South Dakota Frontier (Borealis Books). Among the hordes of homesteaders who settled the American West were thousands of single women.

Book from Project Gutenberg: Land of the Burnt Thigh Library of Congress Classification: F590. gutenberg etext 24352.

Choose the part of Land of the Burnt Thigh which you want to read from the table of contents to get started. Many of these books are all time classics appealing to all ages. Authored by many renowned authors of their times, these books are a unique resource of knowledge and enrichment to be cherished forever.

This tale of two sisters courageously homesteading on the prairie in 1907 provides a lively portrait of frontier life."Interesting in its spirit and atmosphere, and it is told simply and well. . . This is an unusual record, well worth reading."—New York Times Book Review"Mrs. Kohl has told this story of South Dakota with a simplicity, a directness, and an understanding of its quietly heroic element which make her book an appealing as well as a significant contribution to the latter-day history of the pioneers."-Saturday Review
User reviews
spacebreeze
This isn't quite up to Rolvaag's masterpiece, "Giants in the Earth," which is the other novel of homesteading South Dakota, but the relatively unknown author, Edith Eudora Kohl, writes pretty well, and tells something like a historical non-fiction story of her years homesteading on two homesteads, one near the Lower Bruce Indian reservation in South Dakota, and one on the reservation itself. Why on the reservation? Because it was among the last land available to homesteaders in the state; Kohl and her sister homesteaded late, in 1907, when most of the land was gone. I'm a South Dakotan, and somewhat familiar with the area, and I can attest that the land we "saved" for the Sioux reservations was not land we wanted, but land that was difficult to farm and to make a living upon. Kohl and her sister were almost ludicrously unprepared, girls from St. Louis with no experience at all in farming, but through perseverance (and some good luck and very helpful neighbors) they found a way to survive on the unforgiving prairie. Rolvaag has the better story, of actual farmers who made the land support them, but Kohl's story of homesteaders who survived on non-ag income -- a newspaper, a post office and a store -- tells a pioneering story that is mostly unknown. As to her relationship with the local Sioux tribe, it is fairly honest, if not very flattering. The Sioux had little interest in assimilating into white culture, and the land we put them on didn't make it possible to succeed anyway, in white culture or in their own. Still, it's an honest story, competently written, with a tale I had never read before. And you can't beat the price.
Auau
WOW! After reading the first few paragraphs, I thought it would be hard to stay interested in this book. However, being a diehard American History addict, I preserved and am glad that I did. The more I read, the more I was drawn into the saga, of these sisters and the day-to-day struggles they endured and refusal to succumb to their hardships and losses. That's what made this country the strongest, cohesive group of people, in the world. This book gives me hope, that if we come together, once more, we can achieve the America that our ancestors sacrificed so much for, and find the peace we seem to have misplaced.
Perongafa
I learned so much from this book about the homesteading era of the early twentieth century. The people and the times really come alive in this memoir of the inspiring lives of two very adventurous and entrepreneurial sisters who left their urban home to live in nothing more than a shack with no water on isolated land with little farming potential. With guts and creativity, they developed their property as well as being instrumental in building a community. They also took notice of the indigenous Indians who were pushed off this land by the US government, and tried to be of some help. This is a very entertaining memoir. Don't be put off by the title which has to do with the Indian's name for the area. Unlike the "Little House" books, this true account makes it clear that many of the homesteaders were single women--very tough and brave single women!
PanshyR
My great-grandparents emigrated to homestead and farm in Minnesota, South Dakota, and Nebraska. My family lived with wood heat, no electricity nor plumbing, until I started school which by today's standards seems uncivilized. But in comparison, these women braved much more primitive conditions in order to homestead central South Dakota land in 1908, and without the knowledge of how farm. They were city girls, with minimal financial wherewithal, who purchased a claim only to discover it was a tarpaper shack. Foolhardy but determined, they battled -30 degree winter temperatures, blizzards, prairie fires, and drought. Frail but stubborn, they learned how to set type and publish a newspaper, and rallied their fellow homesteaders to cooperate in order to survive. One has to give credit to their pluck!
Kage
A remarkable story--at times, I wondered if it were too remarkable to be credible. But after reading it--and wanting a sequel that she never wrote--I researched Edith Ammons Kohl. It was hard to find anything, but I finally found a bio. She did, in fact, play a key role in the settlements of South Dakota, Wyoming and later Colorado, where she wrote for the Denver Post for many years. Her resilience and ingenuity would put most young people today to shame, and she did it in a time when women were supposed to tend the home fires and not much else. She and her sister and their neighbors lived in rickety, tar-paper covered shacks in weather that ranged from the upper 90s to 30 below and high winds that raged across the plains. They had to haul their water long distances, survived drought, rattlesnake infestations, blizzards, fires and more--but they helped forge a community that survived by intense collaboration. Edith and Ida Mary even became trusted friends and trading partners of their Lakota neighbors. Surprisingly, she and her sister were not alone; the book speaks of a significant number of single women who braved the privations of the wilderness and extremes of weather to carve out a future for themselves.

It wasn't our land to take and settle, however. For the other side of the story, read Neihardt's "Black Elk Speaks," Smith's "Moon of Popping Trees," Nerburn's "Neither Wolf nor Dog," and, of course, "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee."
Ishnsius
Story tells of homesteading on an Indian Reservation in South Dakota. It reads much like other pioneer moving West experiences but in a different place. Yes, it is remarkable that two women lasted on barren ground, found other ways of making money and made friends with the Indians. They were from a privileged lifestyle but proved up on their land. The book has a very good introduction by Glenda Riley, who has done serious research on the subject.