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Free eBook Firehouse download

by David Halberstam

Free eBook Firehouse download ISBN: 1401300057
Author: David Halberstam
Publisher: Hachette Books; 1 edition (May 29, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 201
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1375 mb
Size FLAC: 1108 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: rtf lit txt docx


David Halberstam (1934-2007) was the author of twenty-two books, including fifteen bestsellers. Born in New York City, Halberstam spent much of the 1960s as a reporter for The New York Times, covering the Vietnam War and the Civil Rights movement

David Halberstam (1934-2007) was the author of twenty-two books, including fifteen bestsellers. Born in New York City, Halberstam spent much of the 1960s as a reporter for The New York Times, covering the Vietnam War and the Civil Rights movement. His Vietnam reporting earned him both a George C. Polk Award and a 1964 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting. Vanity Fair dubbed Halberstam "the Moses of American journalism," and the subjects of his books reflect his passion and range: war, foreign policy, history, and sports.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. If you have tears, prepare to shed them. Frank McCourt In the firehouse, the men not only live and eat with each other.

David Halberstam (April 10, 1934 – April 23, 2007) was an American journalist and historian, known for his work on the Vietnam War, politics, history, the Civil Rights Movement, business, media, American culture, and later, sports journalism. He won a Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting in 1964.

Firehouse takes us to the epicenter of the tragedy.

One of America's most distinguished reporters and historians offers the. Firehouse takes us to the epicenter of the tragedy. Through the kind of intimate portraits that are Halberstam's trademark, we watch the day unfold-the men called to duty while their families wait anxiously for news of them. In addition, we come to understand the culture of the firehouse itself: why gifted men do this; why, in so many instances, they are eager to follow in their fathers' footsteps and serve in so dangerous a profession; and why, more than anything else, it is not just a job, but a calling.

Politicians sometimes showed up and spoke, and there was a certain amount of resentment about that heir rote phrases like: On . .

Politicians sometimes showed up and spoke, and there was a certain amount of resentment about that heir rote phrases like: On a day when the worst of mankind showed itself, the best of mankind answered it. Sometimes the house was edgy now, and little things that previously would have gone unnoticed might set the men off. Part of it was the loss of Bruce Gary and Jimmy Giberson, the two men most responsible for setting and controlling the tone of the house

So writes David Halberstam, one of America's most distinguished reporters and historians in this stunning book about Engine 40, Ladder 35 one of the firehouses hardest hit in the aftermath of the terrorist attack on the World Trade Towers

So writes David Halberstam, one of America's most distinguished reporters and historians in this stunning book about Engine 40, Ladder 35 one of the firehouses hardest hit in the aftermath of the terrorist attack on the World Trade Towers. On the morning of September 11, 2001, two rigs carrying 13 men set out from this firehouse, located on the west side of Manhattan near Lincoln Center; twelve of the men would never return. Firehouse takes us to the very epicenter of the tragedy. We watch the day unfold, the men called to duty, while their families wait anxiously for news of them. Firehouse is a book that will move readers as few others have in our time. Through the kind of intimate portraits that are Halberstam’s trademark, we watch the day unfold-the men called to duty while their families wait anxiously for news of them. USA Today Poignant and immediate portrait of a New York firehouse. Halberstam delivers a jolting study in the impermanence of things, the swiftness with which the world can be transformed. San Francisco Chronicle Always clear-eyed and affecting.

Through the kind of intimate portraits that are Halberstam's trademark, we watch the day unfold-the men called to duty while their families wait anxiously for news of them.

Firehouse, Halberstam, David. Варианты приобретения. So writes David Halberstam, one of Americas most distinguished reporters and historians, in this stunning New York Times bestselling book about Engine 40, Ladder 35, located on the West Side of Manhattan near Lincoln Center. On the morning of September 11, 2001, two rigs carrying thirteen men set out from this firehouse: twelve of them would never return. Resembles John Herseys 1946 classic Hiroshima.

"If you have tears, prepare to shed them."--Frank McCourt "In the firehouse, the men not only live and eat with each other, they play sports together, go off to drink together, help repair one another's houses, and, most important, share terrifying risks; their loyalties to each other must, by the demands of the dangers they face, be instinctive and absolute." So writes David Halberstam, one of America's most distinguished reporters and historians, in this stunning New York Times bestselling book about Engine 40, Ladder 35, located on the West Side of Manhattan near Lincoln Center. On the morning of September 11, 2001, two rigs carrying thirteen men set out from this firehouse: twelve of them would never return. Firehouse takes us to the epicenter of the tragedy. Through the kind of intimate portraits that are Halberstam's trademark, we watch the day unfold--the men called to duty while their families wait anxiously for news of them. In addition, we come to understand the culture of the firehouse itself: why gifted men do this; why, in so many instances, they are eager to follow in their fathers' footsteps and serve in so dangerous a profession; and why, more than anything else, it is not just a job, but a calling. This is journalism-as-history at its best, the story of what happens when one small institution gets caught in an apocalyptic day. Firehouse is a book that will move readers as few others have in our time.
User reviews
Keramar
I feel as if I'm talking to a ghost. Not just the ghosts of the men from Engine 40/Ladder 35, but the ghost of David Halberstam who was gone within a few years of writing this book. So many lives lost way too soon.

I seem to be on a 9/11 drive, having read The Day the World Came to Town: 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland earlier this year and just finishing Thunder Dog: The True Story of a Blind Man, His Guide Dog, and the Triumph of Trust at Ground Zero prior to this book. ALthough both of those books moved me, this moved me to ugly tears while riding the Staten Island Ferry.

I liked how the early pages of the book set the tone for the neighborhood's demographic shift. In some ways it's a biography of the building and company as well as the house. The chalkboards with the names are poignant as cover flaps and now I almost feel as if I need to make a pilgrimage.

I liked the way Halberstam worked with the surviving men from the other tours -all but one who went out that morning died- as well as the dead men's spouses to construct profiles that truly brought each of the men to life. No matter how much time I spend on the Upper West Side, I don't think I've ever seen this firehouse. I do feel as if I know all of these men though. Men who no doubt knew they were taking their last ride when they left the firehouse and headed down to Ground Zero within an hour of the first plane hitting.

I see Jack Lynch at what is now the Memorial & Museum but what was then The Hole watching and waiting for them to be able to excavate the area where he knew his son was. I see all those memorials, all those kids who will now grow up without their fathers. I feel as if I know Callahan, Giberson and his boots, Otten, Roberts, Bracken and the Bracken Bounce, Morello and his love of cars, Shea, Ginley, GAry. Buddha, Lynch, Marshall, Mercado and D'Auria. I hope that this book and their memories in their families' hearts and mind keep them alive. Like the Arizona and oil.
Damdyagab
I have to admit I didn't know about this book until I read Halberstam's obituary. Once I got a copy and read it I quickly decided that this was one of his best works - if not the best. A look into his neighborhood firehouse and the men who worked there and died on 9/11.

You meet all the men and learn about their lives. Most of them had firefighters in thier family. Most were married although one was seperated and one had a fiancee. It is important to learn about their lives outside the firehouse because it gives greater substance to thier lives inside the firehouse. You learn of one man's decision to remodel the firehouse after it had officially been remodeled but left living space restricted and unpopular. His officer was told to stay away because "you don't want to know what is happening" as the man knocked down the walls with a sledge hammer. Their captain is new to the fire house and the men and they aren't sure about him. At one fire he is given an unpopular order by superiors to go through a decontamination process. He tells the superior that you and your men went through the same place we did so you need to do this and we'll be watching to make sure you do. With that he told his men to get on the rig and go back to the firehouse. His men decided that "they had a captain!".

Thirteen men went out to the WTC. Twelve died and one survived but with lasting medical problems. What I found to be particularly tragic was that one man was a replacement from another fire house. He didn't even have time to unpack his bag before he went out with the others. Did anyone have a chance to meet him? Did he die not knowing the men around him? I find that troubling - to die with men you know is one thing - to die not knowing them or them not knowing you is worse.

Most of the men weren't found right away - it was months later that they were found when an access road was cleared away from the site. Under the road were the men. The vigil by families as they visited the site to mourn and in their own way participate in the search was moving and quite understandable.

There are many moving moments in this book. How could there not be. It is something most men knew might happen but were incredibly confident that it wouldn't happen to them. It is also moving to read as the families cope with this disaster in thier many ways and on many levels.

The only regret I had about the book was that it was published too soon. One man was still missing so we don't know if his body was ever found. Maybe it would have been useful for a followup volume to provide closure for the readers as they have all become intimitely involved with the men and families of the firehouse.

It is a small book and a relatively quick read but it is well worth it. I think this is one of Halberstam's best efforts and probably one that was the most intimate for him.

I highly recommend this book.
Uris
Anything written by David Halberstam is going to be exceptionally well-researched and written, and this is no exception.

The flaw with this book is there's not enough of it. I knew that it was a short book, but I ended up wanting a lot more about the inner workings of a firehouse. While there was some of that, it was more a elegy to each of the 12 firefighters from this house that died on 9/11 - and Halberstam never pretended it was anything else, so it's to his credit it left me wanting more.

Since his subjects had all died, it's a testament to his reporting skills that he makes them all come alive in just 200 pages for 12 men. A reader does get to know each of them in different ways - they might come across a little too perfect at times, but that's the nature of the subject and not surprising for a book barely a year after 9/11.

For a book about a firehouse, without the overwhelming influence of 9/11, Dennis Smith's "Report from Engine Co. 82" is a good place to turn. "Firehouse," however, still humanizes some of the men lost on 9/11, and for that it's very valuable.
Rivik
David Halberstam has written, in my opinion, the best description of "what firefighters are made of", that I have ever read; and I have read a lot of books about firefighters. I spent 36 years in the ranks, and this depiction of the men from Engine 40 and Ladder 35 of the FDNY is beautiful. The reader will see the real "heartbeat" of those who serve, as well as experience the highs and lows that they accept, both at work, and within their families. You will see love as you have never seen it, and toughness that is unparalleled. Mr. Halberstam has taken an approach to writing that is both factual and heart-warming, and I thank him for his accomplishments at showing the world the value of these "everyday heroes" who live among us, and who sacrificially provide us with a greater quality of life; sometimes at the loss of their own.