» » September Swoon: Richie Allen, the ’64 Phillies, and Racial Integration (Keystone Books)

Free eBook September Swoon: Richie Allen, the ’64 Phillies, and Racial Integration (Keystone Books) download

by William C. Kashatus

Free eBook September Swoon: Richie Allen, the ’64 Phillies, and Racial Integration (Keystone Books) download ISBN: 0271023333
Author: William C. Kashatus
Publisher: Penn State University Press; 1 edition (February 2, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 280
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1771 mb
Size FLAC: 1196 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: rtf mbr txt azw


September Swoon, by Bill Kashatus, is a great book chronicling the losing streak and the er. Author William Kashatus shows how the Phillies had been perrenial doormats with just two pennants (1915, 1950) in the 20th Century, and were the last NL squad to integrate.

September Swoon, by Bill Kashatus, is a great book chronicling the losing streak and the era. It will be released next month by Pennsylvania State University Press. This is a must-read for Phils’ fans. Then in the early 1960's management shook off its racist past and sought an integrated player roster.

What sets September Swoon apart from previous &'64 books is an earnest attempt by Kashatus to craft a parallel narrative . the problems the Phillies faced with the racial integration that centered on talented rookie Richie Allen.

What sets September Swoon apart from previous &'64 books is an earnest attempt by Kashatus to craft a parallel narrative about the seismic shifts that were occurring simultaneously in Philadelphia&'s sociological landscape. Political figures and civil rights activists carry equal weight with the heroes of Connie Mack Stadium. Any Phillies fan will enjoy reading Kashatus's interesting book.

by William C. Kashatus. Everything seemed to be going the Phillies' way. Up by 6 1/2 games with just 12 left to play in the 1964 season, they appeared to have clinched their first pennant in more than a decade. Outfielder Johnny Callison narrowly missed being the National League MVP. Third baseman Richie Allen was Rookie of the Year. But the "Fightin' Phils" didn't make it to the postseason-they lost 10 straight and finished a game behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

September Swoon book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. September Swoon: Richie Allen, the '64 Phillies, and Racial Integration (Keystone Books®). by. William C.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. September Swoon: Richie Allen, the '64 Phillies, and Racial Integration (Keystone Book). 0 Mb. Harriet Tubman: A Biography (Greenwood Biographies). James A. McGowan, William C. 7 Mb. Lou Gehrig: A Biography (Baseball's All-Time Greatest Hitters).

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Lost Days: Book Three of The Killing Game Series.

Keywords: September Swoon, Richie Allen, Integrationby Kashatus, Racial Integrationby, Kashatus William, University Press, Phillies.

ISSN: 2153-2109 Print ISSN: 0031-4528.

Everything seemed to be going the Phillies’ way. Up by 6 1/2 games with just 12 left to play in the 1964 season, they appeared to have clinched their first pennant in more than a decade. Outfielder Johnny Callison narrowly missed being the National League MVP. Third baseman Richie Allen was Rookie of the Year. But the "Fightin’ Phils" didn’t make it to the postseason—they lost 10 straight and finished a game behind the St. Louis Cardinals. Besides engineering the greatest collapse of any team in major league baseball history, the ’64 Phillies had another, more important distinction: they were Philadelphia’s first truly integrated baseball team. In September Swoon William Kashatus tells the dramatic story—both on the field and off the field—of the Phillies’ bittersweet season of 1964.

More than any other team in Philadelphia’s sports history, the ’64 Phillies saddled the city with a reputation for being a "loser." Even when victory seemed assured, Philadelphia found a way to lose. Unfortunately, the collapse, dubbed the "September swoon," was the beginning of a self-destructive skid in both team play and racial integration, for the very things that made the players unique threatened to tear the team apart. An antagonistic press and contentious fans blamed Richie Allen, the Phillies’ first black superstar, for the team’s losing ways, accusing him of dividing the team along racial lines. Allen manipulated the resulting controversy in the hopes that he would be traded, but in the process he managed to further fray already tenuous race relations.

Based on personal interviews, player biographies, and newspaper accounts, September Swoon brings to life a season and a team that got so many Philadelphians, both black and white, to care deeply and passionately about the game at a turbulent period in the city’s—and our nation’s—history. The hometown fans reveled in their triumphs and cried in their defeat, because they saw in them a reflection of themselves. The ’64 Phillies not only won over the loyalties of a racially divided city, but gave Philadelphians a reason to dream—of a pennant, of a contender, and of a City of Brotherly Love.

User reviews
Xanna
I was 13 in 1964, and I must have listened to or watched every Philles game I could. I wasn't really a baseball fan, but I had always been a Phillies fan, even though, truth be told, I didn't really understand a lot about the game. It was about heroes and my much maligned hometown of Philadelphia. But mostly it was about Richie Allen, who I really admired, and who, prior to Mike Schmidt, was the one guy on the Phils I can say I would have paid good money to see. I went to Connie Mack Stadium with my Dad (and was secretly horrified by the neighborhood), eventually taking the Red Arrow bus because my Dad was wary of driving into North Philly. And that's the very real subtext of the book. White people driving--one or way or another--into the world of integration in a Northern city in the early 1960s. It was not an easy road for anyone. Kashatus really gives a lot of insight into the stuff that Allen put up with, but he also gives a vivid sense of how weird it was for a lot of white, ethnic, working-class people (me) to have their hopes pinned on a young black man whom they applauded in public and used unspeakable terms for in private. Talk about strained relations. Then there was the hypercritical Philly sports fan (who shelled Santa Claus with snowballs in later times), a knowledgeable, but, face it, vicious press corps, and a lot of resentment of the Carpenter family, who owned the Phils--and, to judge from some of their former employees who made it with the organization--were pretty adept at buying people too.

You get some insights into the organization, a little into the internal politics--not a lot--and portraits of some of the players, not in great depth, certainly, but intriguing enough. Who knew that Johnny Callison had to work tending bar after his playing days were over? I had Clay Dalrymple pegged as a knuckehead, but he comes off as knowledgeable and articulate here. And Gene Mauch, the Little General who couldn't. A lot of the blame for the infamous collapse ends up on Mauch, for overmanaging a choking club, and ultimately panicking. You could know a lot of baseball--Gene did--but not know much about handling people. And Gene didn't.

Kashatus is very good with the aftermath of 1964, something that the Phils didn't really shed until the mid 1970s after some really lean times. The club in the early 1970s was young, talented, but frequently awful. And I somehow doubt that some of the same racial tensions that were or weren't there in 1964 were (or weren't) with the club into the 1980s. You know, America's game, America's problems.

I bought leftover 1964 Phillies World Series tickets at Lit Brothers in Philadelphia and had them framed. I gave them to my girlfriend in college, because they were my most prized possession. She (my wife) says she still has them--somewhere. Just like I keep the memories of that summer locked away, still 13 years old, somewhere.

If you're an aging Boomer from Philly and a Phillies fan, you have to read this book. Not a classic, but a very, very absorbing read.
Mr_Mole
This is a readable look at the 1964 Phillies team that just missed winning the pennant. Author William Kashatus shows how the Phillies had been perrenial doormats with just two pennants (1915, 1950) in the 20th Century, and were the last NL squad to integrate. Then in the early 1960's management shook off its racist past and sought an integrated player roster. Shrewd moves brought in talent like Jim Bunning, John Callison, Richie (Dick) Allen, Chris Short, Tony Taylor, Cookie Rojas, etc., helping the team jump to respectability after 1961. The author takes us through the long 1964 season where the Phillies held first place and exicted the City of Brotherly Love throughout the summer. Then we see the heart-breaking finish, the Phils losing ten of their last twelve to finish a game behind St. Louis. Kashatus examines manager Gene Mauch's harmful use of starters Jim Bunning and Chris Short on two-day's rest during the late-September collapse, but barely mentions team shortages in offense and pitching depth, nor potential harm from Mauch's high-strung style and love for sacrifice bunting. The last chapters cover the team's slow decline from 1965-1969 against a backdrop of the irresponsible antics of superstar Dick Allen.

Overall, this is an interesting but imperfect effort. I liked the look at the players, management, the city's troubled sociology, and the footnotes, though the author should have devoted more prose to the 1964 season. Also, blaming Dick Allen's crybaby antics largely on racism seems debatable, as is the author's assertion that an irresponsible, non-hustling star (Allen) doesn't affect lesser players nor team performance.

Note: Dick Allen's 1972 MVP year practically saved the White Sox franchise, and his tossing foul balls to Sox fans (the penalty was $50) helped end that idiotic rule. But despite being treated well in Chicago, Allen soon returned to his immature antics and wore out his welcome.
BoberMod
Marvelous book which describes the times and the fall of the Phillies in a momentous pennant season. The book is about the failure of the Phillies organization to adequately deal with a tremendous talent who was unprepared for the despicable discrimination he received. My wife grew up with the Allens and while the town in which they were brought up was far from perfect, the Allen family was respected for their accomplishments. The Phillies never should have placed Dick Allen in Little Rock and should have backed him during his all too brief career with the organization. The book also compellingly describes the collapse and the managerial failures of Gene Mauch who could have produced a winner but made too many bad moves. This slice of time is beautifully and fairly described.
EROROHALO
great book that says a lot about this great player. this might be his time finally to join the hall of fame. excellent transaction
Uyehuguita
An in depth account of the biggest collapse of a team in MLB history. The Phillies should have won the '64 National League pennant but choked when the chips were down! Also it provides a sad account of racism in MLB during the 50's and 60's.
greed style
Excellant
Kamick
Just what I ordered. My Uncle, John Ogden, who was a scout for the Phillies at the time, signed Richie Alan in 1960 along with his two brothers. Richie had nothing but praise for my uncle, pages 46 and 47. It's funny I've lived in Ellwood City, PA for a number of years, which is close to Wumpum, PA, where Richie was born, went to school, and played Baseball. Richie Allen was a natural all around athlete and stared in both Basketball and Baseball.

I didn't know of Richie at that time as I lived in Wyoming and went to high school and college there. In 1860 I was only in the eigth grade of school.

I'm enjoying the book!
Perfect