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Free eBook Japanese Mind: The Goliath Explained download

by Robert C. Christopher

Free eBook Japanese Mind: The Goliath Explained download ISBN: 0671449478
Author: Robert C. Christopher
Publisher: Simon & Schuster; First Edition edition (May 1, 1983)
Language: English
Pages: 352
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1258 mb
Size FLAC: 1589 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: lrf docx mbr mobi


by. Christopher, Robert . 1924-1992.

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The Japanese Mind book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Japanese Mind: The Goliath Explained as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. An entertaining and thorough introduction to all things Japanese. Read by Robert C. Christopher.

Robert Collins Christopher (March 3, 1924 – June 15, 1992) was an American journalist who specialized in coverage of Japanese business and culture. From 1981 until his death, he served as administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes

Robert Collins Christopher (March 3, 1924 – June 15, 1992) was an American journalist who specialized in coverage of Japanese business and culture. From 1981 until his death, he served as administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes. A native of Thomaston, Connecticut, Christopher served in the United States Army during World War II in an intelligence capacity in the Pacific Theater of Operations (including the Occupation of Japan) from 1943 to 1946

Book Condition: Collectible: VeryGood. Dust Jacket Condition: Acceptable.

Book Condition: Collectible: VeryGood. The Japanese Mind is the first book since the classic The Chrysanthemum and the sword toexplain Japanin all of its complexity-and thus the only book every to lay bare that nations’remarkable life since the war. Its author is a distinguished journalist whoseintimate knowledge of Japan,spanning the last three decades, has produced an unprecedented understanding ofJapanese culture-of institutions and intellect, mores and motives.

The Goliath Explained. oceedings{M, title {The Japanese Mind. The Goliath Explained. author {Bernard Saint-Jacques and Robert C. Christopher}, year {1985} }. Bernard Saint-Jacques, Robert C.

The Japanese Mind: The Goliath Explained. By Robert C. The Japanese Mind: The Goliath Explained. This is a superb book, with the insight and wisdom of nearly 40 years of thoughtful study and first-hand experience. It combines personal vignettes with a sympathetic, objective and up-to-the-minute grasp of virtually every aspect of Japanese society, as well as of the practical policy issues that now make the . Japan relationship at once vital and sensitive to possible change.

An entertaining and thorough introduction to all things Japanese. Much has been written about Japanese management.

An entertaining and thorough introduction to all things Japanese. Much has been written about Japanese management. But this is the first book to explain the people, the life, and the culture of that fascinating nation.
User reviews
Phobism
This should be required reading for anyone planning to work in Japan. I wish that I have read it a year ago. I own few copies, and give them to my "gaijin" friends in Tokyo.
OK, this book is also little dated, but have not found anything newer or more accurate.
hardy
I can't believe I'm the first reviewer of this superb classic "must read" on the subject of Japan and the Japanese. Forget the 1980's publication date--you can rest assured that the collective psyche of this ancient people hasn't drifted significantly since then, and probably never will, in spite of all the many but relatively superficial changes of the past two decades.

The quickest and best way by far to grok the Japanese, individually and collectively, is to read this [from the jacket blurb] "wise, entertaining and highly readable" page-turner of a book.

The distinguished and percipient author (ex-Senior Editor of Time, Oriental Studies/Yale, Pulitzer Prize administrator, etc. etc. etc.) spent 3 decades absorbing every aspect of "Japanese culture ... intellect, mores and motives".

A highly principled thinker, Christopher has extracted, and presents concisely in Chapter 2, a "framework ...of seven basic propositions" or principles that summarize the bases of "the imperatives of what amounts to an ancient tribe", and collectively outline the "perfect map of the Japanese psyche" that the rest of the book fleshes out.

"Here at last is *all* of Japan" indeed; as the jacket blurb quite accurately states, Christopher "does for Japan what Luigi Barzini did for 'The Italians'" (and I might add, what the similarly qualified Richard Bernstein did for those two perennially warring nations, France and Paris in "Fragile Glory", another utter must-read).

I'm tempted to list the principles here, but it would practically constitute copyright infringement, since those principles, briefly elaborated upon, constitute the biggest overall "Aha!" experience of the book. Read Chapter 2 alone and you're wise to the game; but read the rest of the book as well, and acquire a richly textured perspective on how the seven insights illuminate a panoply of issues, from the roles of women and children through workplace idiosyncrasies to the instincts and talents for international and cultural survival.

One teaser: the reason the Japanese seem so inscrutable by so many, and strangely the more so by those most intimate with the culture by virtue of speaking Japanese, is that (duh!) the Japanese aren't particularly eager to *be* 'scruted, either collectively by foreigners or (especially) individually--the latter even by each other!

These observations may seem relatively self-evident to many; but Christopher astutely expands on them, in connection with a few related social attitudes, to show how they paradoxically aid both individuals and the culture as a whole in the pursuit of their various aims.

As I said, the guy is percipient--just search the multiple Amazon listings for a bargain copy of the book, read chapters 1 and 2, and then cruise through the remainder of the book as through an absorbing amusement park adventure ride!

P.S. If you're as impressed with people who can extract foundational principles from a morass of data as I am, check out my reviews of "Origins of Southern Radicalism: The South Carolina Upcountry, 1800-1860 " and "Dwellings: Living with Great Style"....
dermeco
I can't believe I'm the first reviewer of this superb classic "must read" on the subject of Japan and the Japanese. Forget the 1980's publication date--you can rest assured that the collective psyche of this ancient people hasn't drifted significantly since then, and probably never will, in spite of all the many but relatively superficial changes of the past two decades.

The quickest and best way by far to grok the Japanese, individually and collectively, is to read this [from the jacket blurb] "wise, entertaining and highly readable" page-turner of a book.

The distinguished and percipient author (ex-Senior Editor of Time, Oriental Studies/Yale, Pulitzer Prize administrator, etc. etc. etc.) spent 3 decades absorbing every aspect of "Japanese culture ... intellect, mores and motives".

A highly principled thinker, Christopher has extracted, and presents concisely in Chapter 2, a "framework ...of seven basic propositions" or principles that summarize the bases of "the imperatives of what amounts to an ancient tribe", and collectively outline the "perfect map of the Japanese psyche" that the rest of the book fleshes out.

"Here at last is *all* of Japan" indeed; as the jacket blurb quite accurately states, Christopher "does for Japan what Luigi Barzini did for 'The Italians'" (and I might add, what the similarly qualified Richard Bernstein did for those two perennially warring nations, France and Paris in "Fragile Glory", another utter must-read).

I'm tempted to list the principles here, but it would practically constitute copyright infringement, since those principles, briefly elaborated upon, constitute the biggest overall "Aha!" experience of the book. Read Chapter 2 alone and you're wise to the game; but read the rest of the book as well, and acquire a richly textured perspective on how the seven insights illuminate a panoply of issues, from the roles of women and children through workplace idiosyncrasies to the instincts and talents for international and cultural survival.

One teaser: the reason the Japanese seem so inscrutable by so many, and strangely the more so by those most intimate with the culture by virtue of speaking Japanese, is that (duh!) the Japanese aren't particularly eager to *be* 'scruted, either collectively by foreigners or (especially) individually--the latter even by each other!

These observations may seem relatively self-evident to many; but Christopher astutely expands on them, in connection with a few related social attitudes, to show how they paradoxically aid both individuals and the culture as a whole in the pursuit of their various aims.

As I said, the guy is percipient--just search the multiple Amazon listings for a bargain copy of the book, read chapters 1 and 2, and then cruise through the remainder of the book as through an absorbing amusement park adventure ride!

P.S. If you're as impressed with people who can extract foundational principles from a morass of data as I am, check out my reviews of "Origins of Southern Radicalism: The South Carolina Upcountry, 1800-1860 " and "Dwellings: Living with Great Style"....