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Free eBook The Making of Black Detroit in the Age of Henry Ford download

by Beth Tompkins Bates

Free eBook The Making of Black Detroit in the Age of Henry Ford download ISBN: 0807835641
Author: Beth Tompkins Bates
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; New edition edition (September 24, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 360
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1572 mb
Size FLAC: 1352 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: azw doc lit lrf


Beth Tompkins Bates delves further back than others have into the 1920s and extends her critical eye to community formation and the political activities of Detroit's blacks, many of whom were in the first wave of the Great Migration.

Beth Tompkins Bates delves further back than others have into the 1920s and extends her critical eye to community formation and the political activities of Detroit's blacks, many of whom were in the first wave of the Great Migration.

In the 1920s, Henry Ford hired thousands of African American men for his open-shop system of auto manufacturing. This move was a rejection of the notion that better jobs were for white men only. In The Making of Black Detroit in the Age of Henry Ford, Beth Tompkins Bates explains how black Detroiters, newly arrived from the South, seized the economic opportunities offered by Ford in the hope of gaining greater economic security.

Beth tompkins bates .

Book Description: In the 1920s, Henry Ford hired thousands of African American men for his open-shop system of auto manufacturing. At the same time allegiance to Henry Ford, the other anchor of black Detroit’s American plan for full participation, remained high in 1926 and 1927 as competition within the auto industry put Ford jobs at risk. By the time of the Great Depression, however, the balance shifted as black Detroiters threw their allegiance strongly behind the political campaigns of Frank Murphy, Ford’s nemesis.

Beth Tompkins Bates examines the relationship between automaker Henry Ford and the African American in the years between the two World Wars. By the end of World War I, the Ford Motor Company had become a beacon for black migrants

Beth Tompkins Bates examines the relationship between automaker Henry Ford and the African American in the years between the two World Wars. By the end of World War I, the Ford Motor Company had become a beacon for black migrants.

This groundbreaking history demonstrates how by World War II Henry Ford and his company had helped kindle the civil rights movement in Detroit without intending to do so. show more. Format Paperback 360 pages. Dimensions 156 x 235 x 2. mm 52. 3g. Publication date 01 Feb 2014. Publisher The University of North Carolina Press. Publication City/Country Chapel Hill, United States.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Making of Black Detroit in. .

Home Browse Books Book details, The Making of Black Detroit in the Age of Henry. The Making of Black Detroit in the Age of Henry Ford. In the 1920s, Henry Ford hired thousands of African American men for his open-shop system of auto manufacturing. the unfolding narrative is anchored to Henry Ford and his desire to revolutionize the world through the production and sales of his Model T, affectionately known as the Tin Lizzie.

Keywords: Bates, Ford, township, Detroit, FMC, trusted, coercive, gratitude, African Americans, bankruptcy. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

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The book argues that, in the period between the two world wars, Detroit’s black community moved from a.It is the first part of this story which is less well-known and where Bates’ book breaks the most substantial new ground.

The book argues that, in the period between the two world wars, Detroit’s black community moved from a vision of community development based upon an alliance with Henry Ford and his motor company to embrace a labour-oriented civil rights agenda. The first chapters neatly sketch out the forces that shaped the mass migration of black workers to the motor city in the last years of the 1910s and first years of the 1920s.

This move was a rejection of the notion that better jobs were for white men only

In the 1920s, Henry Ford hired thousands of African American men for his open-shop system of auto manufacturing.

In the 1920s, Henry Ford hired thousands of African American men for his open-shop system of auto manufacturing. This move was a rejection of the notion that better jobs were for white men only. In The Making of Black Detroit in the Age of Henry Ford, Beth Tompkins Bates explains how black Detroiters, newly arrived from the South, seized the economic opportunities offered by Ford in the hope of gaining greater economic security. As these workers came to realize that Ford's anti-union "American Plan" did not allow them full access to the American Dream, their loyalty eroded, and they sought empowerment by pursuing a broad activist agenda. This, in turn, led them to play a pivotal role in the United Auto Workers' challenge to Ford's interests. In order to fully understand this complex shift, Bates traces allegiances among Detroit's African American community as reflected in its opposition to the Ku Klux Klan, challenges to unfair housing practices, and demands for increased and effective political participation. This groundbreaking history demonstrates how by World War II Henry Ford and his company had helped kindle the civil rights movement in Detroit without intending to do so.
User reviews
CopamHuk
The Making of Black Detroit is a wonderful book, even if the title is somewhat misleading. Beth Tompkins Bates examines the relationship between automaker Henry Ford and the African American in the years between the two World Wars. By the end of World War I, the Ford Motor Company had become a beacon for black migrants. Whatever his motives, Ford chose to open up jobs to black workers even when his competitors would not. Bates then carefully demonstrates how the relationship changed over time: how black workers moved from a position of loyalty (feigned or real) to a position of assertively standing up to Ford by working to bring the United Autoworkers into Ford's plants; Ford was vehemently anti-union and apparently counted on the presence of loyal black workers to keep the union out. Bates' work, however, suffers from some of the flaws of many academic texts: repetitive writing, jargon and an overuse of acronyms. And the title: Several monographs written in the last 30 years or so have described the "making" of Black Detroit (most notably Richard Thomas' Life for Us Is What We Make It), but Bates really doesn't address the development of the African American community. Her work more accurately could be titled African Americans and the Shadow of Henry Ford. This work, however, still will be of interest to those students of African American history, urban history and labor history.
Joni_Dep
An interesting read that paints an objective historical relationship between Henry Ford and the African American workforce. 3 more words
Uthergo
I was born and raised in Grosse Pointe, but lived in Detroit in a mixed neighborhood for five years. I learned a lot I never knew about Henry Ford and the black community, all of it fascinating.
Teonyo
It was a very good read, being that I'm from Highland Park Mi, home of Henry Fords car company it open my eyes to things that i never knew went on in the city before my time. I understand better now what happen to Black people in the city of Detroit.
Mave
Excellent look at the history of workers,rise of unions at Ford.