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Free eBook George Gordon Meade and the War in the East (Civil War Campaigns and Commanders Series) download

by Ethan S. Rafuse

Free eBook George Gordon Meade and the War in the East (Civil War Campaigns and Commanders Series) download ISBN: 1893114368
Author: Ethan S. Rafuse
Publisher: State House Press; First Hardcover Edition edition (June 12, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 192
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1768 mb
Size FLAC: 1867 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: docx rtf mbr doc


Ethan Rafuse is producing outstanding books on the Civil Wa.

Ethan Rafuse is producing outstanding books on the Civil War. I bought this book because he is the author and was not disappointed. It also helps to have a firm background on the war in the east, because Rafuse presents a number of issues in the course of the work solely from Meade's point of view, without a great deal of context which would explain why his nemeses, real or imagined, like Lincoln, Grant, and Sheridan, acted in the way they did. We learn that Meade was a soldier's soldier, who believed to his core that military matters were best left to professionals, without meddling from mere politicians.

Even though he defeated Robert E. Lee in the Civil War's greatest battle, George Gordon Meade has never enjoyed a prominent place in the pantheon of Union wa. .

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Meade entered the Civil War as a brigadier general and first served during the Peninsula Campaign in 1862

Meade entered the Civil War as a brigadier general and first served during the Peninsula Campaign in 1862. He was badly wounded at the Battle of Glendale during the Seven Days Battles, but recovered and went on to perform admirably at the Battles of Antietam and Fredericksburg. Following the uneventful campaigns of Bristoe and Mine Run in late 1863, in the spring of 1864 Meade’s authority was superseded by the appointment of Ulysses S. Grant as general-in-chief of all Union armies. Although he was still technically the commander of the Army of the Potomac, for the rest of the war Meade acted as Grant’s subordinate.

To most students of the Civil War, he is merely the man who was lucky enough to benefit from Confederate mistakes at Gettysburg, but whose shortcomings as a commander compelled Abraham Lincoln to bring in Uly Even though he defeated Robert E. Lee in the Civil War's greatest battle, George Gordon Meade has never enjoyed a prominent place in the pantheon of. Union war heroes. In this, the first book-length study of the general to appear in a generation, Ethan S. Rafuse challenges the notion that Meade was simply the last in a long line of failed Union commanders in the East.

Ethan S. Rafuse is the author of A Single Grand Victory: The First Campaign and Battle of Manassas and George Gordon Meade and the War in the East. He is Associate Professor of Military History at the . Army Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Библиографические данные. The Ongoing Civil War: New Versions of Old Stories Shades of blue and gray series (Том 1). Редакторы. Herman Hattaway, Ethan Sepp Rafuse.

George Gordon Meade (December 31, 1815 – November 6, 1872) was a career United States Army officer and civil engineer best known for defeating Confederate General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Gettysburg in the American Civil War. He previously foug. He previously fought with distinction in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican–American War. During the Civil War, he served as a Union general, rising from command of a brigade to that of the Army of the Potomac.

Army of the Potomac; Places: United States; People: George Gordon Meade (1815-1872); Times: 19th century, Civil War, 1861-1865. By Ethan Sepp Rafuse. George Gordon Meade and the War in the East. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

Meade, George . eorge G. Meade

Meade, George . Meade. Library of Congress, Washington, . reproduction no. LC-DIG-cwpb-05008). Learning to his surprise the same day that Meade took command that the Federal army was north of the Potomac, Lee hastened to concentrate his far-flung legions.

George Gordon Meade, an American Civil War general, is best remembered as the victor of the Battle of Gettysburg and as the last commander of the . After the war Meade commanded military departments in the South and East. He died of pneumonia on November 6, 1872, in Philadelphia.

George Gordon Meade, an American Civil War general, is best remembered as the victor of the Battle of Gettysburg and as the last commander of the Army of the Potomac.

Even though he defeated Robert E. Lee in the Civil War's greatest battle, George Gordon Meade has never enjoyed a prominent place in the pantheon of Union war heroes. To most students of the Civil War, he is merely the man who was lucky enough to benefit from Confederate mistakes at Gettysburg, but whose shortcomings as a commander compelled Abraham Lincoln to bring in Ulysses S. Grant from the West to achieve victory.In this, the first book-length study of the general to appear in a generation, Ethan S. Rafuse challenges the notion that Meade was simply the last in a long line of failed Union commanders in the East. Instead, George Gordon Meade and the War in the East offers a balanced, informative, and complete, yet concise, reconsideration of the general's life and career. It also provides keen analysis of the military and political factors that shaped operations in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania, and delineates the sources of tension between Washington and the Army of the Potomac high command that played such an important role in shaping the war in the Eastern Theater. This study will appeal to anyone with an interest in Meade and the politics of command in the Civil War, and encourage reconsideration of traditional interpretations of the Union war effort in the East.
User reviews
August
George Gordon Meade is the forgotten general of the American Civil War. Overshadowed by Grant, his authority undercut by Sheridan with his victory at Gettysburg questioned by Congress, he continued. In doing so, Meade showed a remarkable professionalism and dedication to victory match by few.

This is a military biography more than a personal one. Meade is married, has family, personal problems all of which take a distant second place to the war. The focus of the book is from Gettysburg to Appomattox, with good coverage from the 7 Days to Chancellorsville. The latter shows us the development of the general and his reputation as a fighting general and a no nonsense commander. His assumption of command was popular with most of the army. The Hooker clique always resented him and worked to destroy him for most of the war. This played into the hands of the radicals, who dislike Meade for his assumed identification with McClellan.

Ethan Rafuse is producing outstanding books on the Civil War. I bought this book because he is the author and was not disappointed. It is an excellent overview of General Meade and covers all the major points of his life.
Zyniam
I picked this up because it is the only modern treatment of Meade and because I thoroughly enjoyed the author's battlefield guide on Antietam, South Mountain,and Harpers Ferry. I found it disappointing.

First, it's even briefer than it appears, for over 50 pages of the book are devoted to maps or biographical sketches of other Civil War personalities. It also helps to have a firm background on the war in the east, because Rafuse presents a number of issues in the course of the work solely from Meade's point of view, without a great deal of context which would explain why his nemeses, real or imagined, like Lincoln, Grant, and Sheridan, acted in the way they did. We learn that Meade was a soldier's soldier, who believed to his core that military matters were best left to professionals, without meddling from mere politicians. It's a shame he rose to prominence in a civil war, where political issues ranging from treatment of civilians, the status of African-Americans, when and if to emancipate slaves, etc., played a vital role in the course of the conflict, and could not merely be left to the generals. Rafuse belatedly addresses some of these issues in an epilogue, but by then, if you have any background in the war in the east at all, you've spent some 140 pages wondering why he chose to only tell part of the story.

We still await a good modern treatment of Meade. And for a better treatment of the totality of the issues arising in the eastern war, albeit in a slightly earlier time, Rafuse's own book on McClellan is a far superior work of history.