» » George Keats of Kentucky: A Life (Topics In Kentucky History)

Free eBook George Keats of Kentucky: A Life (Topics In Kentucky History) download

by John E. Kleber,Lawrence M. Crutcher

Free eBook George Keats of Kentucky: A Life (Topics In Kentucky History) download ISBN: 0813136881
Author: John E. Kleber,Lawrence M. Crutcher
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky (November 5, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 392
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1940 mb
Size FLAC: 1275 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: doc azw txt lrf


Lawrence Crutcher, a descendant of Keats, has written a history so detailed, that investments and debts are described by. .

Lawrence Crutcher, a descendant of Keats, has written a history so detailed, that investments and debts are described by their significance to the society – whether English or American. As the reader walks with Keats down Main Street in 1819, a busy, interesting Louisville emerges; by mid-1820's it is a city of culture, the basis of the lively city today. ―Nana Lampton, Louisville businesswoman, poet, artist. Highly recommended for those interersted in the poet John Keats and Kentucky history.

George Keats of Kentucky: A Life, stands as a valuable contribution to history and . Other Titles from Topics In Kentucky History. Kentucky's Pioneer Sculptor.

George Keats of Kentucky: A Life, stands as a valuable contribution to history and literaturre alike. -Louisville Courier-Journal. Anyone interested in English Romantic literature, antebellum Kentucky or pre-Civil War Louisville will fin dthis book an entertaining and rewarding read. -Bowling Green Daily News.

George Keats of Kentucky book. Topics in Kentucky History)

George Keats of Kentucky book. Topics in Kentucky History). by. Lawrence M. Crutcher, John E. Kleber (Foreword). In addition, George Keats of Kentucky offers a rare and fascinating glimpse into nineteenth-century life, commerce, and entrepreneurship in Louisville and the Bluegrass.

George Keats of Kentucky. John Keats's biographers have rarely been fair to George Keats (1797-1841) - pushing him to the background as the younger brother, painting him as a prodigal son, or labeling him as the business brother. In this authoritative biography, author Lawrence M. Crutcher demonstrates that George Keats deserves better.

Home Browse Books Book details, George Keats of Kentucky: A Life. George Keats of Kentucky: A Life. By Lawrence M. Crutcher.

Book Overview Topics in Kentucky History SeriesLawrence M. A History of Education in Kentucky.

John Keats's biographers have rarely been fair to George Keats (1797-1841) - pushing him to the background as the younger brother, painting him as a prodigal son, or labeling him as the business brother. Topics in Kentucky History SeriesLawrence M.

Lawrence M. Foreword by John E. Kleber. Series: Topics in Kentucky History. Published by: University Press of Kentucky. Book Description: John Keats's biographers have rarely been fair to George Keats (1797-1841) - pushing him to the background as the younger brother, painting him as a prodigal son, or labeling him as the "business brother.

John Keats's biographers have rarely been fair to George Keats (1797 .

John Keats's biographers have rarely been fair to George Keats (1797 – 1841) – pushing him to the background as the younger brother, painting him as a prodigal son, or labeling him as the business brother.

Kentucky was granted statehood in 1792, becomingthe first . state west of the Appalachian Mountains

Kentucky was granted statehood in 1792, becomingthe first . state west of the Appalachian Mountains. Frontiersman Daniel Boone was one of Kentucky’s most prominent explorers and many immigrants followed the trail he blazed through the Cumberland Gap, known as the Wilderness Road. Although it sided with the Confederacy during the Civil War, the population was deeply divided, and many Kentucky residents fought for the North. Known primarily as an agricultural area into the 20th century, Kentucky is also a major . coal producer andsite of the . military bases Fort Knox and Fort Campbell.

By Lawrence M. George Keats (1797-1841), John Keats (1795-1821). George Keats of Kentucky. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Louisville, Kentucky, London (England).

John Keats's biographers have rarely been fair to George Keats (1797–1841)―pushing him to the background as the younger brother, painting him as a prodigal son, or labeling him as the "business brother." Some have even condemned him as a heartless villain who took more than his fair share of an inheritance and abandoned the ailing poet to pursue his own interests. In this authoritative biography, author Lawrence M. Crutcher demonstrates that George Keats deserves better. Crutcher traces his subject from Regency London to the American frontier, correcting the misconceptions surrounding the Keats brothers' relationship and revealing the details of George's remarkable life in Louisville, Kentucky.Brilliantly illustrated with more than ninety color photographs, this engaging book reveals how George Keats embraced new business opportunities to become an important member of the developing urban community. In addition, George Keats of Kentucky offers a rare and fascinating glimpse into nineteenth-century life, commerce, and entrepreneurship in Louisville and the Bluegrass.
User reviews
Ballagar
very good book
Adaly
As a decedent of George, I found the book informative. Addressed many of the other other biographies of Keats, especially the early years. I found it to a must read to learn more about John and George.
Grillador
On a recent trip to London, I took a very pleasurable trip to the Keats House in Hampstead, on the advice of a friend who is a great fan of the Keats brothers. Knowing little of John Keats, I enjoyed the house and left intrigued by the Poet's brother, a man named George Keats, who was referred to either only in passing or as the "business brother." Learning only that he traveled to America to strike out on his own and, horrors, possibly also to make money, he was generally and vaguely disparaged as being somewhat wanting. Learning at the Keats House, among things, that George traveled to and eventually became an important and influential citizen in the early day of Louisville, I became even more fascinated as Kentucky is the home of two of my favorite things: Abraham Lincoln and bourbon.

Lawrence Crutcher, a great-great-great-great grandson of Keats, has done a remarkable and altogether admirable job of fleshing out this previously vague historical character and, in the process, painted a compelling and engaging portrait of a man whose claim on history goes far beyond his relationship to the poet John Keats.

From the perspective of those who are principally proponents of the Poet, it seems that George has long been viewed as having abandoned his brother in the midst of an illness, when he was sick with, and eventually died from, tuberculosis--a family affliction that also took his mother and younger brother. Crutcher blazes new ground through meticulous research that peels back the endless layers of Dickensian complexity around the various estates and wills that would have or could have, but in some cases did not, support the Keats children, which also included a sister, who seems constantly to live on the fringes of the family.

Crutcher persuasively redeems the honor of George Keats and makes the case that Keats, in fact, did all that could be expected of him with regard to the welfare of his more famous and ailing brother. But even more interesting is the picture Crutcher paints of the Englishman who gradually became quite American and the role he played in the early days of what was then the American West--the founding and settling of Kentucky.

Any student of early 19th century America, the fine old state of Kentucky, English manners, or for that matter, Romantic poetry, will surely enjoy reading and will learn much from this thoroughly pleasant and intellectually engaging book. I highly recommended it for Crutcher's artful blend of new academic research, explication of the family squabbles of the famous Keatses, and the story of how his great-great-great-great grandfather came to America, helped create a new city, and created a life for himself and the numerous generations of the Keats family in America that would follow.