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Free eBook The Struggle for Quebec: From Referendum to Referendum? download

by Robert A. Young

Free eBook The Struggle for Quebec: From Referendum to Referendum? download ISBN: 0773518746
Author: Robert A. Young
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press; 1 edition (March 26, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 224
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1166 mb
Size FLAC: 1291 mb
Rating: 4.5
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Linguistic and cultural issues in Canada are substantially more complex than is often assumed by foreigners.

The Struggle for Quebec book.

Personal Name: Young, Robert Andrew. Publication, Distribution, et. Montreal On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The struggle for Quebec : from referendum to referendum?, Robert A. Young.

That referendum coverage also forms the basis of the author’s The Struggle for Quebec: From Referendum to. .

That referendum coverage also forms the basis of the author’s The Struggle for Quebec: From Referendum to Referendum? Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1999] Lajoie, Andrée. The Clarity Act in its Context, in Alain-G. Jean Chrétien’s Quebec Legacy: Coasting, Then Stickhandling Hard, in Lois Harder and Steve Patten (e., The Chrétien Legacy: Politics and Public Policy in Canada. Montreal & Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press. Conclusion: Is Separation the Only Answer? in Misconceiving Canada: The Struggle for National Unity. Toronto: Oxford University Press.

The struggle for Quebec. There's no description for this book yet. from referendum to referendum? by Robert Andrew Young.

The 1995 Quebec independence referendum was the second referendum to ask voters in the Canadian French-speaking province of Quebec whether Quebec should proclaim national sovereignty and become an independent country, with the condition precedent o.

The 1995 Quebec independence referendum was the second referendum to ask voters in the Canadian French-speaking province of Quebec whether Quebec should proclaim national sovereignty and become an independent country, with the condition precedent of offering a political and economic agreement to Canada.

Published by: McGill-Queen's University Press. Before moving on from the 1995 referendum to its effects and to the future, it is worth turning to an important and intriguing question: What would have happened had the Yes side won? This, of course, raises a counterfactual proposition, and because the event did not actually occur, no definitive answer can be supplied here or anywhere else.

Robert Young discusses the ways in which Canadians might reconstitute their country after Quebec separates and considers .

Robert Young discusses the ways in which Canadians might reconstitute their country after Quebec separates and considers possible political and economic arrangements between Quebec and Canada - the "association" aspect of ion - including the breakdown of economic cooperation.

The Québec referendum of 1980, on the Parti Québécois government’s plans for ion, was held in fulfilment of a promise that the party had made to do so, during the 1976 election campaign that brought it to power

The Québec referendum of 1980, on the Parti Québécois government’s plans for ion, was held in fulfilment of a promise that the party had made to do so, during the 1976 election campaign that brought it to power. In this referendum, the government asked the people of Québec to give it a mandate to negotiate a new constitutional agreement with the rest of Canada, based on the equality of nations.

After the referendum, he made front-page news again when he asked the courts to issue a permanent injunction . For Bertrand, enough is enough

After the referendum, he made front-page news again when he asked the courts to issue a permanent injunction banning any referendum that would result in a future unilateral declaration of independence by the Province of Quebec. For Bertrand, enough is enough. In this startling and candid book, Mr. Bertrand describes the long march that led him from being a founding member of the Parti Quebecois and a diehard supporter of independence, to his creation of the Citizens for a Democratic Nation, a movement he founded in January 1996.

In The Struggle for Quebec Young updates this work, treating new developments and making his analysis accessible to a wider audience. He describes the prelude to the 1995 referendum campaign, as well as the history of the campaign itself, analysing the arguments deployed by federalists and sovereigntists and seeking to explain why the Yes forces gained ground in 1995 and almost won. He also suggests what would have happened if the Yes side had actually won the 1995 referendum. Young then assesses the fallout of the referendum - its impact on the attitudes and behaviour of the public, elites, and foreign governments - and describes how the sovereigntists and federalists are manoeuvring around the prospect of another referendum. He considers Lucien Bouchard's policies as well as Ottawa's attempts both to accommodate Quebecers' desires for change - Plan A - and to demonstrate how difficult secession would be - Plan B - and analyses the 1997 federal election and the Calgary accord. All of this lays the groundwork for prediction and Young provides a set of scenarios about what would happen after a Yes vote in a future referendum on sovereignty. The Struggle for Quebec is a current, thorough, and lively book which is indispensable reading for all Canadians concerned with their future.