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Free eBook National Geographic Field Guide to Birds: Texas download

by Jonathan Alderfer

Free eBook National Geographic Field Guide to Birds: Texas download ISBN: 0792241878
Author: Jonathan Alderfer
Publisher: National Geographic (October 4, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 272
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1680 mb
Size FLAC: 1168 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: lrf txt rtf docx


Jonathan Alderfer, a widely published author and field guide illustrator, is well known in the birding community for his expertise as a field ornithologist and his knowledge of North American birds.

Jonathan Alderfer, a widely published author and field guide illustrator, is well known in the birding community for his expertise as a field ornithologist and his knowledge of North American birds.

National Geographic's Field Guide to the Birds of Eastern (2008) and Western (2008) North America have both . There is no way this book comes close to approaching even 25 percent of the birds potentially found in Texas.

National Geographic's Field Guide to the Birds of Eastern (2008) and Western (2008) North America have both been receiving high praise from some very critical birders and it has been my experience this is to be expected. It's too massive for this small book, many of the absent birds are those often mentioned in other birding resources for spring migrations through Texas. It's not impossible to find a Texas book with good coverage.

Автор: Alderfer, Jonathan Название: National Geographic Field Guide to Birds: Texas Издательство: Random . In Texas, birders will find the richest possible range of species in this ultimate migration ground that draws birds from around the world.

In Texas, birders will find the richest possible range of species in this ultimate migration ground that draws birds from around the world.

Start by marking National Geographic Field Guide to Birds: Texas as Want to Read . Jonathan K. Alderfer is an art consultant and a bird artist whose illustrations appear in National Geographic field guides.

Start by marking National Geographic Field Guide to Birds: Texas as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. He began his career as a painter in the 1980s as an illustrator of articles for The Western Tanager, the Los Angeles Audubon Society's newsletter. Jonathan is an avid, expert birder. Books by Jonathan Alderfer.

See all books by Jonathan Alderfer.

Field, Identification Guide. By: Jon L Dunn(Author), Jonathan Alderfer(Author), Paul Lehman(Illustrator). 592 pages, 4,000+ colour illustrations and colour distribution maps. Publisher: National Geographic Society. Perfect for beginning to advanced birders, it is the only book organised to match the latest American Ornithologists’ Union taxonomy. With more than . 5 million copies in print, this is the most frequently updated of all North American bird field guides.

Автор: Alderfer, Jonathan Название: National Geographic Field Guide to Birds: Maryland and Washington .  . Описание: "Maryland and the District of Columbia" is the eleventh title in the series. The Ocean City area makes for excellent birding.

National Geographic's Field Guide to the Birds of North America is the .

National Geographic's Field Guide to the Birds of North America is the most comprehensive, up-to-date and authoritative field guide on the market. Minneapolis Star Tribune blog. Jonathan Alderfer is chief consultant for National Geographic's Birding Program and a widely published author and field guide illustrator. One of the nation's foremost birding artists, he is well known for his authority on North American birds and his expertise as a field ornithologist.

Both city and country birds populate this book-from the water birds of Long Island to the celebrated gulls of Niagra Falls andthe high latitude birds of the Adirondack woodlands. Just west of Rochester, hawks by the thousands pass along the lakeshore ofB. Product Identifiers.

Field Guide to the Birds of North America. by Jonathan Alderfer. 3,500 richly detailed illustrations. More than 300 newly painted, including all hummingbirds.

National Geographic Field Guide to Birds provides affordable, portable, reliable region-specific information, perfect for the novice or experienced birder. In each guide, an introduction by an expert birder from the region offers guidance on where to look for key birds. An opening section gives pointers on how to look for key birds and what to focus on when you spot them. Each guide features approximately 150 birds, grouped by family. Two indexes: one alphabetical and one color-coded help readers identify a bird quickly. Each entry has a vivid photograph showing the bird in its native habitat. On the facing page, there is a list of bulleted points of field identification clues as well as behavioral and habitat information, and the best local places to find the bird. Special field notes give additional i.d. or behavioral information and detailed maps show the range of each bird's habitat. With comprehensive coverage of the region and valuable advice from experts, these user-friendly guides will quickly become favorite companions on the journey to lifelong birding.In Texas, birders will find the richest possible range of species in this ultimate migration ground that draws birds from around the world.
User reviews
Rolorel
If you are anyone other than a novice birder DO NOT purchase this book! This is a photography book more than it is a "Field Guide". It does not provide information on every bird in the state, just the one's the author and editor thought were important. This book is set-up with a one page photo of the male; if you see a female you will need a different book for identification. Opposite the photo is a write-up of the habitat, a state map and a small field note section that may list a similar looking bird or simply more information about the featured bird.

My largest complaint with this book is that the TBRC (Texas Bird Records Committee) for 2011, lists 636 species that have been seen in the state. These include common, accidental, and functionally extinct species that have been previously recorded. In the family Parulidae, or wood-warblers, the TBRC lists 53 species where as Field Guide to Birds - Texas lists only 8 species: the colima, northern parula, tropical parula (field note), yellow-rumped, golden-cheeked, prothonotary, common yellow-throat and a field note on the yellow-breasted chat. What a joke!

Six common species that currently or previously have nested on my property are not listed in this "Field Guide": the piliated woodpecker, the yellow-bellied sapsucker, Mississippi kite, red-shoulder hawk, the wilson's warbler, and the black-and-white warbler. It is in my humble opinion that it is a shame this book is endorsed by National Geographic.
Mardin
Although the photos are nice, they only feature one bird. As you know, the female and male of a species are dramatically different. The book discusses the birds' patterns, but that doesn't provide a quick, easy option to glace and try to learn the birds you are seeing. I found it mostly unhelpful.
VizoRRR
This book is published by the organization which also produces the NA Bird field guide considered "best" by most avid birders, the National Geographic Field Guide (Geo guide for short). However it is absolutely NOTHING like said field guide! It is very small (6 inches by 4 inches) and consists entirely of full page color photographs on the left page, and brief descriptive text with a Texas-only range map on the right page. At the bottom of the text page are even more brief notes, usually about another similar bird, and often accompanied by a tiny painting of that bird (which appears to be taken directly from the Geo Guide).

The photographs are quite good, and really are the only saving grace of the entire book. They appear to be chosen for their artistic value more so than to illustrate field marks, however. The selection of species is extremely superficial - for example, the only species of oriole shown is Bullock's Oriole, despite the fact that in west Texas Scott's Oriole is routinely found, and for birders in the lower Rio Grande valley the target species is likely to be Altamira Oriole (not pictured), or, if coverage was as exceptional as I had hoped an NGS bird publication would be, even Audubon's or Black-vented Oriole - and one also wonders why Orchard Oriole, found throughout the state, is left out!

The book description here on Amazon is "generous" in its pronouncements. The "guidance on where to look for key birds" consists of a one-page, incredibly simplistic commentary on birding in Texas ("The Texas coast is well-known as a place for migrant birds to rest and feed on their way northward." "Other regions of the state include the High Plains where Lesser Prairie-Chickens still strut . . .") Turn the page and the most specific location data provided is a map of the entire state with numerous parks and refuges depicted. But it is left entirely up to you to figure out how to navigate to Anahuac NWR to look for those migrants (where's High Island?), and, since Lesser Prairie-Chicken isn't even included in the main text, how are you supposed to know that Muleshoe NWR might be a place to try to see them?

My greatest hope for this book was that it would give additional insight into the Texas specialities of ABA area birding, but even here it is basically incomplete. Plain Chachalaca, Least Grebe, White-tailed Hawk, Crested Caracara, Common Paraque, Buff-bellied Hummingbird, Ringed Kingfisher, Great Kiskadee, Black-capped Vireo, Green Jay, Colima and Golden-cheeked Warbler, and Olive Sparrow are all here, but missing are a few regular species which make Texas birding so unique, such as Groove-billed Ani and White-collared Seedeater. Since only in south Texas can a Muscovy Duck be counted (as opposed to being labelled an escapee from you local park's pond), why not show a wild Muscovy instead of another photo of a wild Mallard? And what about every birder's favorite dump denizen, the Tamaulipas Crow?

Overall this book is not recommended, at any level of birding, for any use other than its collection of photographs. For a beginner in the field (or even in the backyard) it doesn't provide the necessary comparison images to differentiate even the most obvious field marks so as to allow identification. For the intermediate birder trying to locate target species in Texas, the guidance (or essential lack thereof) to places where the birds can be found is woeful. And for advanced birders - well, they really don't need something this small in size or detail.

Be aware that there are several other titles in this series, for other states, and I suspect that this review's basic criticisms hold for all of them. As for me, I'll hold on until November when the Fifth Edition of the REAL Geo Guide comes out!
Hystana
The details and narrative are wonderful, but the listing is not very comprehensive. We've spotted at least half a dozen birds not included in the book.
virus
I purchased this book for my parents since they have recently moved to the Carolinas. They have enjoyed using it as they sit at their table watching the birds come to their bird feeding to feed while they eat their morning breakfast.
Uthergo
Great book for bird watchers, small and easily backed in your pocket or backpack for bird watching trips.
Vudogal
Not what I expected. Needed to see more data, i.e., juveniles, females, food the birds eat, sounds they make, etc. It's still a good book and will keep it.
Great book. It's small, but has really good pictures and is broken down into really easy-to-follow sections for beginners.