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Free eBook Epic Journeys of Freedom: Runaway Slaves of the American Revolution and Their Global Quest for Liberty download

by Cassandra Pybus

Free eBook Epic Journeys of Freedom: Runaway Slaves of the American Revolution and Their Global Quest for Liberty download ISBN: 0807055158
Author: Cassandra Pybus
Publisher: Beacon Press; 1 edition (February 15, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 304
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1130 mb
Size FLAC: 1226 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: lit lrf azw lrf


During the American Revolution, thousands of slaves fled from their masters to find freedom with the British. Her description of the upheaval surrounding the American Revolution is sound.

During the American Revolution, thousands of slaves fled from their masters to find freedom with the British. Having emancipated themselves-and with rhetoric about the inalienable rights of free men ringing in their ears-these men and women struggled tenaciously to make liberty a reality in their lives. Cassandra Pybus’s book adds much needed historical documentation to a group of people who have largely been forgotten by history.

Epic Journeys of Freedom book. This book by Cassandra Pybus tells a largely untold story of the American Revolution-how did it affect slaves and free people of color, and what did the years after the war hold for them?

Epic Journeys of Freedom book. This book by Cassandra Pybus tells a largely untold story of the American Revolution-how did it affect slaves and free people of color, and what did the years after the war hold for them? The scope of this book is sweeping, so much so that it gets in the way of clarity at times. The book was hard to follow at certain points due to how much Pybus tries to cover and how many historical figures she includes.

Epic Journeys of Freedom is the astounding story of these runaways and the lives they made on four continents. Cassandra Pybus adds greatly to the work of scholars by insisting that slaves stand at the center of their own history. Having emancipated themselves, with the rhetoric about the inalienable rights of free men ringing in their ears, these men and women struggled tenaciously to make liberty a reality in their own lives. Her 'biographies' of flight expose the dangers that escape entailed and the courage it took to risk all for freedom.

Runaway Slaves of the American Revolution and Their Global Quest for Liberty. During the American Revolution, thousands of slaves fled from their masters to find freedom with the British

Runaway Slaves of the American Revolution and Their Global Quest for Liberty. During the American Revolution, thousands of slaves fled from their masters to find freedom with the British. Having emancipated themselves–and with rhetoric about the inalienable rights of free men ringing in their ears–these men and women struggled tenaciously to make liberty a reality in their lives. This alternative narrative includes the stories of dozens of individuals–including Harry, one of George Washington’s slaves–who left America and forged difficult new lives in far-flung corners of the British Empire.

Epic Journeys of Freedom: Runaway slaves of the American Revolution and their global quest for liberty (2006). Black Founders: The unknown story of Australia's first black settlers (2006). American Citizens, British Slaves: Yankee political prisoners in an Australian penal colony, 1839–1850 (with Hamish Maxwell-Stewart; 2002). The Devil and James McAuley (1999). Till Apples Grow on an Orange Tree (1998). White Rajah: A Dynastic Intrigue (1996).

MUSC 250 - Spring 2015. An urban patchwork of 18 th and 19th century Krio freed slaves homes monstrous. COUN 504 - Spring 2015.

Epic Journeys of Freedom: Runaway Slaves of the American Revolution and Their Global Quest for Liberty by Cassandra Pybus 1)What is the Book of Negroes? What does it reveal? 2)What were some of the risks that the black settlers of Granville Town faced? 3)Who was Alexander Falconbridge? . MUSC 250 - Spring 2015. MUSC 450 Epic Journeys of Freedom Questions and Answers. What tribe did Cinque and his colleagues hail from Cinque and his colleagues. Meyers Cultural Immersion Part One (2). What students are saying.

Epic journeys of freedom

Epic journeys of freedom. Runaway Slaves of the American Revolution and Their Global Quest for Liberty. Australian historian Pybus (The Woman Who Walked to Russia, 2003, et. discusses how the ideals of the Revolution filled the hearts and minds of slaves throughout the country and prompted them to embark on their own quest for liberty. Ironically, it was the British who gave them their first, best opportunity by promising to emancipate slaves who helped subdue the rebellious Americans. The British defeat, however, muddied the road to freedom.

Cassandra Pybus talked about her book Epic Journeys of Freedom: Runaway Slaves of the American Revolution and Their Global Quest for Liberty, published by Beacon Press. She traced the paths of several former slaves, including those of George Washington, as they fled to British colonies in Sierra Leone, Botany Bay, Australia, and Africa. After her presentation she answered audience members' questions.

Among American audiences-academic and general readers alike-the historical fact that most of the founding fathers  .

Among American audiences-academic and general readers alike-the historical fact that most of the founding fathers owned slaves is common knowledge-or at least it should be. However, thanks to the controversy surrounding Sally Hemmings, popular attention is usually focused on Thomas Jefferson. Pybus shows a rare picture of former slaves fighting vehemently, in the face of every challenge, to resist every indignity and injustice that had defined their lives as slaves and to define their own freedom.

During the American Revolution, thousands of slaves fled from their masters to find freedom with the British. Having emancipated themselves--and with rhetoric about the inalienable rights of free men ringing in their ears--these men and women struggled tenaciously to make liberty a reality in their lives.This alternative narrative includes the stories of dozens of individuals--including Harry, one of George Washington's slaves--who left America and forged difficult new lives in far-flung corners of the British Empire. Written in the best tradition of history from the bottom up, this pathbreaking work will alter the way we think about the American Revolution.
User reviews
MisterMax
The first three "official" reviews of this book fail to convey the sheer original, revealing, even emotional nature of this book. Many Americans now accept that their patriotic Revolutionary ancestors--including the Founding Fathers--owned slaves. Some Americans are aware that many of these slaves fled to the British controlled areas and cities under the promise of gaining freedom. A few Americans may then know of what happened to these former slaves--how many were take off to Nova Scotia with thousands of white Loyalists. What Cassandra Pybus reveals in this book opens all this up into dimensions undreamed of by all but perhaps a literal handful of historians. And in fact, what she presents is more like a nightmare than a dream. In an impeccably researched and footnoted narrative, she first investigates those three relatively "knowns" that I referred to above, providing details that will astound most of us. And when she goes onto present the story of what happenened to most of these former slaves as they movd on not only to Nova Scotia and London but then on to Sierra Leone and Australia--well, it is history as revelation. Although Pybus stays rooted in the strictest procedures of the historian, the end effect is to feel you are reading a novel. But a novel describing events of such unnmitigated misery, of human suffering, of human cruelty, that no novelist would dare invent these happenings. I defy any reader to put the book down saying (a) "Oh, I had suspected all this might have happened" and (b) "In any case I can't see getting especially worked up over it." The end result is a book that both charges far more human beings than we have imagined with being cruel to African-Americans and at the same time informs us of how many of these same African-Americans endured these cruelties and utimately prevailed. In a word, I found it spellbinding!
Lonesome Orange Kid
I was looking for links to an ancestor of mine who came to Australia via joining British troops in America, then going with them to U.K and finally deported on 1st fleet. Found many references in this book and have filled a big gap in family history.
Mikarr
The book was a little confusing at first but never the less did its job in telling a bunch of great stories. I am sure that many did not know of these experiences during that time period. I glad my professor made us read it.
Cerana
I am simply humbled and stunned at how mind-changing this book is.

Epic Journeys of Freedom recounts the tribulations of Runaway Slaves during the American War of Independence. It opens the door to a whole movement of slaves who jumped at the chance at collaborating with the British "loyalists" in exchange for their freedom - and out of pure hatred at their American slave-holding revolutionaries.

The likes of George Washington and Co. are portrayed for what their are: inspired ideologues with a sinister background of slave brutality. That they could talk about the rights of man while pleasantly looking at the suffering and torturing of their slaves (Washington personally saw to the punishment in quite sadistic ways of any slave attempting to flee) shows the inherent hypocrisy of the times.

The journeys of these runaway slaves, nonetheless, was but a straight one. They were used and exploited in their quest for a self-made free life, and would end up shipped to the furthers corners of the Earth - to Nova Scotia in Canada, to Australia, to Sierra Leone. The experiences they all endured are touching, moving, gripping. I simply could not put the book down, and i must confess that my eyes were watering quite often.
SING
While most American schoolchildren in the U.S. are taught of the American Revolution as a glorious struggle of backwoods colonials fighting for their freedom and independence against the world's most powerful empire, few, if any, are taught of the great tragedy experienced by African-Americans, many of them former slaves, who fought with or sided with the British in the hopes that they would secure their individual freedoms. I was one of those many schoolchildren inculcated in the myth of the Revolution, but I have since expanded my knowledge of the Revolution beyond the history texts. Despite this, I was not aware of the globe-circling stories of former slaves of the American Revolution as carefully documented and researched by Cassandra Pybus in "Epic Journeys of Freedom". But now that I am, I hope these stories become more widely known as examples of not only the failure of the American Revolution to live up to its ideals, but more important, as examples of the unquenchable human desire for freedom and the extent to which brave men and women will go to find it.

I cannot do justice to any of the individual stories in "Epic Journeys of Freedom" in this or any review, and much of the immediacy and drama of the stories come from the first-hand sources of the era that Pybus has collected and orchestrated into compelling narratives. By retelling the history of individual lives set within the context of the American Revolution and its aftermath, Pybus reduces a mythic, seminal event in America's founding to a personal level. The eyes through which we see the Revolution, however, belong not to the victors, but to the disenfranchised and dehumanized; America's victory meant their enslavement, so they fled the land of liberty to seek their own freedom across distant borders and oceans.

Some may ask why bring up more stories of America's past injustices when we have come so far in addressing them. We read these stories and remember their lives because they remind us why men and women have risked all and died for their freedom. They remind us of both our worse and better natures, and offer hope for a more just and free world.