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Free eBook Political Indoctrination in the U.S. Army from World War II to the Vietnam War (Studies in War, Society, and the Military) download

by Christopher S. DeRosa

Free eBook Political Indoctrination in the U.S. Army from World War II to the Vietnam War (Studies in War, Society, and the Military) download ISBN: 0803224869
Author: Christopher S. DeRosa
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press (April 17, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 348
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1751 mb
Size FLAC: 1770 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: txt azw docx lrf


by Christopher S. DeRosa. the major topics in quality as well as case studies from relevant real-world situations yet withou. and tinnitus associated with service in the Armed Forces since World War II. The resulting book, &.

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Christopher S. DeRosa examines soldiers’ formal political indoctrination, focusing . Studies in War, Society, and the Military (1 - 10 of 41 books).

Christopher S. DeRosa examines soldiers’ formal political indoctrination, focusing on the political training of draftees and short-term volunteers from 1940 to 1973. No trivia or quizzes yet.

to them at odds with the democratic, individualistic genius of American society. Anxious to Work Bodily Destruction Political Indoctrination in World War II 1.

Few of the officials who ran the United States Army's "Troop Information" programs from World War II through the Vietnam War failed to invoke von Steuben's observation in defending their mission. They saw themselves as explainers rather than persuaders, different from the enemy's propagandists not by degree but on fundamental principle. Propaganda" seemed to them at odds with the democratic, individualistic genius of American society.

One of the greatest challenges American military leaders have faced since the American Revolution has been to motivate citizens to forego their own sense of private identity in favor of the collective identity needed to wage war effectively. More from New Books in History

These challenges, and the US Army’s response from the start of the Second World War through the Cold War until the end of the Vietnam War, are the subject of Christopher DeRosa‘s book Political Indoctrination in the . Army from World War II to the Vietnam War (University of Nebraska Press, 2006). DeRosa investigates the cultures and mechanisms of creating political cohesion in the draftee army during the heyday of American conscription.

Are you sure you want to remove Political indoctrination in the . by Christopher S. Published 2006 by University of Nebraska Press in Lincoln Series. Studies in war, society, and the military. Army from World War II to the Vietnam War from your list? Political indoctrination in the . Army from World War II to the Vietnam War. Published 2006 by University of Nebraska Press in Lincoln.

After World War I, he spent short periods at the Military Orthopaedic. Political Indoctrination in the . Hospital, Shepherds Bush, and the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital before settling in at St. Thomas. There he was an essential element in the development of the orthopedic department. January 2007 · The Journal of Military History. During World War I the government and private agencies had made some effort to teach common social and moral values to enlisted men, and citizenship education had remained a small part of soldier training in the interwar years.

Opposition to United States involvement in the Vietnam War began with demonstrations in 1964 against the escalating role of the . military in the Vietnam War and grew into a broad social movement over the ensuing several years. This movement informed and helped shape the vigorous and polarizing debate, primarily in the United States, during the second half of the 1960s and early 1970s on how to end the war.

For five years during World War II, Indochina was a French-administered possession of Japan. Most nationalists, however, denounced these maneuvers, and leadership in the struggle for independence from the French remained with the Viet Minh. On September 22, 1940, Jean Decoux, the French governor-general appointed by the Vichy government after the fall of France to the Nazis, concluded an agreement with the Japanese that permitted the stationing of 30,000 Japanese troops in Indochina and the use of all major Vietnamese airports by the Japanese military. Dien Bien Phu, Battle ofFrench defeat by Viet Minh at Dien Bien Phu, northern Vietnam, 1954.

After drilling troops during the American Revolution, Baron Friedrich von Steuben reportedly noted that although one could tell a Prussian what to do and expect him to do it, one had to tell an American why he ought to do something before he would comply. Although such individualistic thinking is part of the democratic genius of American society, it also complicates efforts to train and educate citizen-soldiers.

For more than three decades, the U.S. Army’s “Troop Information” program used films, radio programs, pamphlets, and lectures to stir patriotism and spark contempt for the enemy. Christopher S. DeRosa examines soldiers’ formal political indoctrination, focusing on the political training of draftees and short-term volunteers from 1940 to 1973.

DeRosa draws on the records of the army and the Department of Defense’s information offices, the content of the indoctrination materials themselves, and soldiers’ recollections in analyzing the political messages the nation conveyed to its army during three decades of conscription. He examines how the program took root as an army institution, how its technique evolved over time, and how it interacted with the larger American political culture. In so doing, he explores the implications of trying to impose a political consensus on the army of a democracy.