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Free eBook The Indicted South: Public Criticism, Southern Inferiority, and the Politics of Whiteness (New Directions in Southern Studies) download

by Angie Maxwell

Free eBook The Indicted South: Public Criticism, Southern Inferiority, and the Politics of Whiteness (New Directions in Southern Studies) download ISBN: 1469611643
Author: Angie Maxwell
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 1 edition (April 15, 2014)
Language: English
Pages: 324
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1457 mb
Size FLAC: 1598 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: mbr azw lit docx


Home Browse Books Book details, The Indicted South: Public . Fred Hobson, Tell about the South: The Southern Rage to Explain.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Indicted South: Public Criticism, Southern. The Indicted South: Public Criticism, Southern Inferiority, and the Politics of Whiteness. Chapter 6 - The Not So New Criticism Reconfigured, Yet Unregenerate 144. Part III - The Amassment of Resistance 167. Chapter 7 - Black, White, Gray, and Brown the Old Dominion Confronts Integration 172.

EPILOGUE The Politics of Inferiority: Conservatism, Creationism, and the Culture Wars.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. EPILOGUE The Politics of Inferiority: Conservatism, Creationism, and the Culture Wars. My list of debts both large and small is as long as one would expect. It takes a village not only to raise a child but also to write a book.

Series: New Directions in Southern Studies. Published by: University of North Carolina Press.

The Indicted South book. Her new book, The Long Southern Strategy will be published in June by Oxford University Press. Books by Angie Maxwell. Angie Maxwell is the Director of the Diane Blair Center of Southern Politics and Society, an associate professor of political science, and holder of the Diane Blair Endowed Professorship in Southern Studies at the University of Arkansas. Maxwell is a Truman Scholar and received her P. in American Studies from the University of Texas.

Angie Maxwell is the Diane D. Blair professor of southern studies and assistant professor of political science at the University of Arkansas. Maxwell will talk about her new book, The Indicted South: Public Criticism, Southern Inferiority, and the Politics of Whiteness. In this interdisciplinary study, Maxwell examines and connects three key 20th-century moments in which the South was exposed to intense public criticism, identifying in white southerners' responses a pattern of defensiveness that shaped the region's political and cultural conservatism.

The Indicted South: Public Criticism, Southern Inferiority, and the Politics of Whiteness (New Directions in. .This study takes working class conservatism seriously and refuses to wave it away as false consciousness.

The Indicted South: Public Criticism, Southern Inferiority, and the Politics of Whiteness (New Directions in Southern Studies). ―David Roediger, Babcock Professor of History, University of Illinois. In a narrative that is briskly written, closely argued, and generally persuasive.

Rent Indicted South at Chegg. com and save up to 80% off list price and 90% off used textbooks. Subtitle Public Criticism, Southern Inferiority, and the Politics of Whiteness.

Her new book is The Indicted South: Public Criticism, Southern Inferiority, and the Politics of Whiteness . I've just started a new book that considers the impact of what I'm calling "The Long southern Strategy" on white southern distinctiveness.

Her new book is The Indicted South: Public Criticism, Southern Inferiority, and the Politics of Whiteness {UNC Press, 2014). AMS "ATX iS ablog dechcated to. representing the many activities and interests of the department of. American Studies at The unavers,ty of. Texas at Austin. Whereas poli tical scientists have seem consumed, at least so far, with locating the origin of southern realignment with the Republican Party in the. second half of the 2oth century, 1see the shift as a movement that extends beyond the initial.

Journal of American Studies. Volume 49 Issue 4: fictions of speculation. Angie Maxwell, English Français. Journal of American Studies. Recommend this journal.

By the 1920s, the sectional reconciliation that had seemed achievable after Reconstruction was foundering, and the South was increasingly perceived and portrayed as impoverished, uneducated, and backward. In this interdisciplinary study, Angie Maxwell examines and connects three key twentieth-century moments in which the South was exposed to intense public criticism, identifying in white southerners' responses a pattern of defensiveness that shaped the region's political and cultural conservatism.Maxwell exposes the way the perception of regional inferiority confronted all types of southerners, focusing on the 1925 Scopes trial in Dayton, Tennessee, and the birth of the anti-evolution movement; the publication of I'll Take My Stand and the turn to New Criticism by the Southern Agrarians; and Virginia's campaign of Massive Resistance and Interposition in response to the Brown v. Board of Education decision. Tracing the effects of media scrutiny and the ridicule that characterized national discourse in each of these cases, Maxwell reveals the reactionary responses that linked modern southern whiteness with anti-elitism, states' rights, fundamentalism, and majoritarianism.
User reviews
Doktilar
The sense of the white South as beleaguered is generally known but the author does a very fine job by honing in on the Scopes trial in Tennessee, the articulation of the New Criticism based on the Fugitives and "I'll Take My Stand" and the finally massive resistance in the 1950s to demonstrate how the region tended to circle the wagons when its values and institutions came under attack.
Samutilar
Touching upon the modern "southern strategy" one needs to understand its underpinnings in order to understand why it was so politically successful in the south. . Residual resentment arising from an inferiority complex based on being involved in an immoral cause, slavery, then losing the Civil War followed by legislative segregation flavors all of the southern states' legislative shortcomings today. The southern racists want it to remain their model of societal vision. Put in the shortcomings associated with rural biblical old testament faith-based answers rather than honestly dealing with race relations and one can see how the south will remain under the societal microscope while the rest of the country moves on in race relations. The south has painted itself into an immoral corner where it wants respect from the rest of the country but attempts to do so by continuing efforts to restore the mythical pre-Civil War society's mores where the white population dominates and somehow the non-white population is happy with these efforts. A total fantasy land and a societal and historical dead-end makes the southern strategy a continuing embarrassment to us all.
Siatanni
(I strongly emphasize that the following is filtered through my own colored glasses, but they are honest impressions in my own effort to come to terms with my past.)

I am a white man, 74 years old.

I was raised as the son of a naval supply officer, and spent several of my formative years in Virginia in the 1950's; both of my parents were Southerners. My father was a Southern Baptist, and my mother was a Methodist, but as a Navy brat, I was mostly insulated from the events in Virginia at the time, although I do remember the phrases "Lost Cause" and "States Rights". I was raised with a perspective of the US's pristine role in WWII against Nazism and Japanese imperialism (my father was supply officer of the cruiser USS Quincy, offshore during D-Day, and later was in Tokyo Bay for the signing of the Japanese surrender.

I never knew why we were yanked from public school in Virginia in my early teens and summarily enrolled in a private Catholic school, except that, to be sure, it was better, except we all had to learn Catechism....

When we moved to California, I had severe problems - I couldn't make sense of reality, and my final HS report card was 5 D's and one C. I joined the Navy, and finally even Boot Camp made sense - I went to a fantastic Electronic Technical school and graduated as a Radar Technician. When I was close to the end of my enlistment, I took exams, and had the option of entering the Navy's NESEP program, or attending University of California at Santa Barbara... I chose the latter, since I didn't think there were any girls at MIT or Perdue...:)

My trip through college was turbulent, but I fell in love again with Physics during the summer session of 1964 at UC Berkeley.

Enter the Free Speech Movement, where Mario Savio had just returned from Freedom Summer in Mississippi. I was stunned as I began to understand the dignity and courage of MLK and the others in the Civil Rights movement (including Savio and other white organizers in the FSM who had ventured into such hostile country to register Black American voters) ..

After much agonizing (I was very poor), I finally became one of the 800 arrested in Sproul Hall. I had written a long 8 page letter and together with some of the handouts, sent the documents to my father (whose response to me was that it was a communist plot, which made absolutely no sense to me), who forwarded it to Gov. (Pat) Brown . Gov Brown replied, saying "Dear Mr. K......, I think you have wonderful son, even though I am probably responsible for his arrest....."

Anyway, I finally graduated, but Vietnam was going strong, and I couldn't see a future in technology, since I thought any security clearance would be rendered null and void. (I could not understand why my parents seemed to be so anti-science - they wouldn't co-sign a note for my tuition in my senior year), and didn't even congratulate me for being accepted into physics grad school at UCSB....

So I left for Spain to try to find a niche as a Flamenco guitarist (silly me...) Reagan had just come to power in California, and I was thinking of settling in Canada or Denmark.... :)

(Ironically, after many adventures, I came back to Santa Barbara just as SDI was pouring money into think tanks locally - I started out at a low level just to learn computers, since I realized that they were going to have a major transformative effect... and the goal was to break the Russian hegemony using their power). I eventually was promoted and given the opportunity to continue my education in physics and math. When peace broke out we all lost our jobs, but eventually I was picked up by the City of Santa Barbara, and finished my career as a programmer/analyst for the SBPD.

That said, this book has been a clarifying event in my life. I had thought the Civil War was over, especially when Barack Obama was elected (a true political genius, and a wonderful family to represent the United States to the world); but it turns out that the Civil War is alive and well in the minds of those Republicans living in the idiot villages throughout the south (and, sadly, in the Midwest), and the Bibble Belt still exists.

I am in my second reading, and it focuses the period and helps me understand my experience in my personal maelstrom during that period and up to the present. It helped me also understand why my father, a career naval officer (Annapolis, yet) could somehow be employed by his government his whole life and remain a Republican (and he finished his career as director of the welfare dept in his city); I understand much better the foundation of the hypocrisy ...

I think my parents may have grown later in life (they certainly did help me occasionally, and had other good qualities as well), but I remained personally estranged from them for most of our lives after the experiences in my 20's.

Thank you, Angie, Good Job!
Thabel
Good book
Venemarr
Repetitious
virus
This 2014 book by a professor at the University of Arkansas studies the Scopes trial of 1925, the Agrarian manifesto of 12 southern writers in 1930, and the massive resistance led by Virginia to the Supreme Court's decision in Brown v. Board of Education. The discussian of the Scopes trial is of interest, though Larson's Summer for the Gods (read 3 Oct 1998) is a more popular account. The discussion of the 1930 manifesto was erudite, boring, and never showed me that it was as important as the author attempts to show. By far the most interesting part of the book is the study of the massive resistance which Virginia led to the Brown decision of 1954. One stands in amazement how benighted that effort was, though of course the author's thesis that it made for tremendous changes in the South's political course is sadly true.