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Free eBook The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer (Fesler-Lampert Minnesota Heritage Books (Hardcover)) download

by Louis Kaplan

Free eBook The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer (Fesler-Lampert Minnesota Heritage Books (Hardcover)) download ISBN: 0816651566
Author: Louis Kaplan
Publisher: Univ Of Minnesota Press; 1 edition (October 17, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 288
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1369 mb
Size FLAC: 1794 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: txt lrf mbr azw


Professor Louis Kaplan allows history to speak in its own words for most of The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer

The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer is the definitive resource for this unique and fascinating moment in American history and provides insights into today’s ghosts in the machine. Professor Louis Kaplan allows history to speak in its own words for most of The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer. He couldn’t have made a more enlightening or entertaining choice.

University of Minnesota Press /. Minneapolis, London. An earlier version of the section Paranoia in the Conclusion was published as Where Paranoid Meets the Paranormal: Speculations on Spirit Photography, Art Journal (Fall 2003). p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. isbn 978-0-8166-5156-6 (hc : alk. paper) - isbn 978-0-8166-5157-3 (pb : alk. paper) 1. Spirit photography.

Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). No other book brings together in one source the testimonies of William Mumler and his critics, critical and historical analysis, and selections from the rich collections of extant Mumler photographs. An intriguing and valuable work. Jennifer Tucker, author of Nature Exposed: Photography as Eyewitness in Victorian Science.

The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer (Fesler-Lampert Minnesota Heritage Books). Download (pdf, 1. 5 Mb) Donate Read.

In the 1860s, William Mumler photographed ghosts-or so he claimed. Faint images of the dearly departed lurked in the background with the living, like his well-known photo of the recently assassinated Abraham Lincoln comforting Mary Todd.

Kaplan’s book is particularly relevant because he asserts that spirit photographs bring to the surface . In the 1860s, William Mumler photographed ghosts-or so he claimed

Kaplan’s book is particularly relevant because he asserts that spirit photographs bring to the surface our deep connection with photography itself. In the 1860s, William Mumler photographed ghosts-or so he claimed. The practice came to be known as spirit photography, and some believed Mumler was channeling the dead. Skeptics, however, called it a fraudulent trick on the gullible, taking advantage of the grieving at a time of suffering and loss.

In the 1860s, William Mumler photographed ghosts-or so he claimed

In the 1860s, William Mumler photographed ghosts-or so he claimed. Kaplan’s book provides a good introduction for those unfamiliar with Mumler and offers a solid overview of Mumler's place in the history of photography generally (the author’s academic area of interest).

Fesler-Lampert Minnesota Heritage Books (Paperback). By (author) Louis Kaplan.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer (Fesler-Lampert Minnesota Heritage Books). Категория: Искусство, Графические виды искусства. 1. 5 Mb. More Tales from Grimm (Fesler-Lampert Minnesota Heritage).

Author:-Kaplan, Louis. Publisher:-University of Minnesota Press. Read full description. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- People who bought this also bought. See details and exclusions. Photography and Spirit by John Harvey (Paperback, 2007).

Kaplan brings together Mumler's haunting images, his revealing memoir, and rich primary sources. He also contributes two extended essays, which offer a historical perspective of the Mumler phenomena and delve into the sociocultural and theoretical issues surrounding this vivid ghost story.
User reviews
Whiteseeker
This isn't an easy read but it contains so much rare material that it's worth the time to read carefully. The book examines the life, work and controversies surrounding one of the most fascinating characters in the world of the weird. Was Mumler a brilliant shyster (I argue yes) or a very gifted channeler of the dead? Read on and draw your own conclusions.
funike
Go see the play in Cincinnati
Flathan
The story of a charlatan
LeXXXuS
"The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer" is on the ROROTOKO list of cutting-edge intellectual nonfiction. Professor Kaplan's book interview ran here as cover feature on February 27, 2009.
Kage
This is a great book about William Mumler. It gives you insight into what he was doing, how he was attacked by the local prosecutor and is influence on the spiritualist movement. Not a quick read, but lots of good photos, and plenty of interesting content.
Nto
Everyone likes a good ghost story, and everyone has a curiosity about ghosts; some are ready to be astonished at accounts of visits from the spirit world, others to be astonished at the credulity of those who believe such accounts. William Mumler gave a good dose of astonishment for both sides. Mumler, who was active in the 1860s, photographed spirits for the benefit of the bereaved, and his photos fit into the Spiritualist thinking of the time. In _The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer_ (University of Minnesota Press), Louis Kaplan, an associate professor of history and theory of photography, has given the history of Mumler's work, and for the most part the history speaks for itself. He reprints Mumler's own account of his experiences with spirit photography, P. T. Barnum's thoughts on the issue, the argument of the counsel attempting to prosecute Mumler for fraud, and best of all the verbatim press reports about Mumler's career and trial. To read the original documents is to come to a close understanding of the largely American, largely 19th- century craze for communicating with the dead.

Kaplan points out that Mumler could not have flourished "without the intellectual and spiritual support and patronage of the religious movement known as Spiritualism." Mumler had worked as an engraver, and took photographs as a hobby. He claimed that he was completely surprised when shadow images showed up on his plates, hovering over the overt subjects of his portraits. He did believe in Spiritualism, and his wife was a medium. He was happy to have his photos stand as scientific evidence that family members who had crossed to the other side were still with us, and Spiritualist journals like _The Banner of Light_ tended to gush about his photographic successes. P. T. Barnum devoted a chapter of his 1866 book _Humbugs of the World_ to spirit photography. Barnum was one of the witnesses called for the prosecution when Mumler was brought before Judge John Dowling in April and May 1869, to see if the charges of fraud (in the form of felony and misdemeanor) ought to be presented to the grand jury. There were also witnesses to testify that the spirit photographs were genuine manifestations of real spirits. Both sides drew upon the Bible's accounts of spirits to show respectively that they indubitably existed but on the other hand that they existed in an unphotographable form. The prosecutor explained, "Man is naturally both credulous and superstitious, and in all ages of the world imposters and cheats have taken advantage of this credulous and superstitious nature to impose upon their fellows less sharp in intellect than themselves." He listed nine methods by which such photographs could be faked, but the actual process used by Mumler was never found; the prosecutor did mention that the more carefully Mumler's processing of the photograph was watched, the less likely it was to have any extra images, or clear ones. The judge's decision hinged on this; though Mumler had boasted of his mediumistic power, during the trial he averred that he never knew and never claimed to know how the spirits were arranging to show up for their portraits. Since no one had actually caught him doctoring the plates, the judge let Mumler go. The headline in the _New York World_ was, "THE TRIUMPH OF THE GHOSTS". The _Herald_ said such a decision was linked to the general breakdown of social order and a rush of society into bedlam.

Kaplan's volume reproduces many of Mumler's photos, including his most famous, the ghostly image of Lincoln over the shoulder of his widow who had come in for just such a photo. For being so full of joy on "the other side", none of these spirits smiles - they all have the same dour expressions as the living subjects of photographs of the period. Some only show up as disembodied hands. Some thrust crosses into the hands of the sitters. One strums a guitar which a real woman holds. Some shower flowers. It is a great shame that there seems to be no explanation of how the "Spirits of Europe, Africa, and America" showed up behind a Master Herrod, for they are something other than spooks of the departed. Every photo looks like some sort of double exposure, and it is hard to understand how people could have fastened so firmly on them as being evidence of spirits rather than evidence of gullibility. It is fun to see the pictures and "judge for yourself", and it is fun to read what Mumler's contemporaries were making of this new religious manifestation. It would be nice to say we are all less likely to be taken in now, but while we don't do Spiritualism the way they did a hundred and fifty years ago, there are still people who think doubly-exposed photos are evidence of departed spirits. Kaplan even tells of a website devoted to contemporary works of this kind, but in the interest of the promotion of sanity, I will refrain from telling you where it is.