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Free eBook In Search of Another Country: Mississippi and the Conservative Counterrevolution (Politics and Society in Modern America) download

by Joseph Crespino

Free eBook In Search of Another Country: Mississippi and the Conservative Counterrevolution (Politics and Society in Modern America) download ISBN: 0691140944
Author: Joseph Crespino
Publisher: Princeton University Press (March 15, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 384
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1441 mb
Size FLAC: 1293 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: lrf lrf azw doc


Crespino counters the facile historical claims of conservatives who identify their movement with the religious, nonviolent, and integrationist civil rights .

Crespino counters the facile historical claims of conservatives who identify their movement with the religious, nonviolent, and integrationist civil rights crusades of the 1950s and early 1960s.

Crespino reveals important divisions among Mississippi whites, offering the most nuanced portrayal yet of how conservative southerners bridged the gap between the politics of Jim Crow and that of the modern Republican South. In the 1960s, Mississippi was the heart of white southern resistance to the civil-rights movement. To many, it was a backward-looking society of racist authoritarianism and violence that was sorely out of step with modern liberal America.

In this ambitious reassessment of racial politics in the deep South, Joseph Crespino reveals how Mississippi leaders strategically accommodated themselves to the demands of civil-rights activists and the federal government seeking to end Jim Crow, and in so doing contributed to a vibrant conservative countermovement.

cle{Murphy2008JosephCS, title {Joseph Crespino. Politics and Society in TwentiethCentury America. This book lends new insight into how white Mississippians gave rise to a broad, popular reaction against modern liberalism that recast American politics in the closing decades of the twentieth century. Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America (Paperback).

The book focuses on Southern segregationists in Mississippi, a state generally considered the most recalcitrant state in the South, Crespino said. Last year, they held a conference at Emory to explore this issue.

Crespino teaches a range of courses on the history of modern American politics and the history of the American South.

Joseph Crespino (born January 10, 1972) is a political historian of the 20th Century United States, specializing in. .

Joseph Crespino (born January 10, 1972) is a political historian of the 20th Century United States, specializing in the history of the American South and of modern conservatism.

In the 1960s, Mississippi was the heart of white southern resistance to the civil-rights movement. Part of the Politics and Society in Modern America Series).

book by Joseph Crespino.

Country: Mississippi and the Conservative Counterrevolution

In this ambitious reassessment of racial politics in the deep South, Joseph Crespino reveals how Mississippi leaders strategically accommodated themselves to the demands of civil-rights activists and the federal government seeking to end Jim Crow, and in so doing contributed to a vibrant conservative countermovement

In the 1960s, Mississippi was the heart of white southern resistance to the civil-rights movement. To many, it was a backward-looking society of racist authoritarianism and violence that was sorely out of step with modern liberal America. White Mississippians, however, had a different vision of themselves and their country, one so persuasive that by 1980 they had become important players in Ronald Reagan's newly ascendant Republican Party.

In this ambitious reassessment of racial politics in the deep South, Joseph Crespino reveals how Mississippi leaders strategically accommodated themselves to the demands of civil-rights activists and the federal government seeking to end Jim Crow, and in so doing contributed to a vibrant conservative countermovement. Crespino explains how white Mississippians linked their fight to preserve Jim Crow with other conservative causes--with evangelical Christians worried about liberalism infecting their churches, with cold warriors concerned about the Communist threat, and with parents worried about where and with whom their children were schooled. Crespino reveals important divisions among Mississippi whites, offering the most nuanced portrayal yet of how conservative southerners bridged the gap between the politics of Jim Crow and that of the modern Republican South.

This book lends new insight into how white Mississippians gave rise to a broad, popular reaction against modern liberalism that recast American politics in the closing decades of the twentieth century.

User reviews
Onetarieva
In his book In Search of Another Country, Joseph Crespino argues that the popular story of how the Republican Party took the South through the use of the "Southern Strategy" is incorrect. Rather it was many pragmatic segregationist reaching out to an influencing the Republican Party and encouraging it to align its views of conservatism with theirs which just happens to also be pro segregation under the guise of freedom of choice and anti communism. The author focuses on Mississippi and shows that the stereotypical rabid rebel flag waving racist that drew the attention of the media was not typical of this new conservative insurgence. Rather the movement was headed by more moderate segregationist that were willing to make concessions where they had too and resist where they had a chance of being successful.
The author covers this from several perspectives from the black church bombings that were denounced even by many pro segregation Mississippians as being too extreme, to school desegregation and the founding of the many all white academies that were having public funds funneled to them. While he does not totally reject the Southern Strategy theory, Crispino argues that it is much more nuanced than is commonly believed. I thought that the part on the efforts of president Nixon reaching out to angry southern Democrats was especially interesting.
I also found this book more than a little depressing. While one may argue about the methods used by pro-segregation forces, the goal was to maintain the racial caste system in Mississippi as much as possible and to some extent they succeeded by aligning conservative beliefs and the defense of white racial privilege. This was some thing that was achieved by political calculations on both sides.
Rainbearer
In current historical scholarship, the rise of modern Conservatism is one of the "hot topics" that is being explored. Historians have evaluated the rise of Conservatism in the South previously (see Matthew Lassiter's book "The Silent Majority", for example), but I am unaware of other attempts to link the Civil Rights Movement and the rise of Modern Conservatism as Joseph Crespino has done in this fine work.

Crespino chose to evaluate Mississippi, which has historically been known as a bastion for inequality and the home of many Civil Rights activities, in the context of political change. He has done so quite skillfully; his arguments demonstrate that Civil Rights and Conservatism are (at least in Mississippi) inextricably linked.

I found the chapter on school integration/segregation and the fights with the IRS to be the most intriguing in the book - this demonstrates Crespino's ability to evaluate multiple sources (government regulations, tax law, and public education) and weave together a compelling narrative explaining how these are related.

I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in either the rise of modern Conservatism or the outgrowth of the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi.
Whatever
It helps to try to understand the background of the ugly polarity in our nation's politics - I doubt it'll ever really be resolved but at least to understand something is a necessary and important first step.
betelgeuze
Joe Crespino's _In Search of Another Country: Mississippi and the Conservative Counterrevolution_ is concerned with understanding two phenomena--white southern resistance to the civil rights movement (as manifested in the state of Mississippi) and the resurgence of conservatism in the last two decades of the twentieth century--and the ways the two phenomena are linked. Existing scholarship has studied each of these issues, as Crespnio notes, and has offered hypotheses to explain the role of white conservative Mississippians in the national Republican triumphs of the 1980s, for instance. One such explanation (the southern strategy thesis) has held, to put it simply, that terms like "states' rights" became coded ways of invoking "segregation today...segregation tomorrow...segregation forever." But such a thesis ignores the complex ways that southerners earnestly initiated a suspicious stance toward a big federal government fueled by taxation and overinvolved in the lives of individuals.

Such suspicion was intimately linked, for instance, to "schools founded by Christian parents trying to provide a holistic religious orientation for their child's education" (13). It's not that religious schools didn't serve the purpose of segregating wealthier white kids from poorer black kids, but they did serve the purpose of educating white conservative children in a Christian context, a purpose white conservatives believed in and espoused whether they gave thought to the segregationist purposes or not. The point is not to defend conservative whites against racism, however, nor even to evaluate their motivations--but rather to understand the motivations in all their nuances. To ignore the conviction of these white conservatives is to simplify both the reality of conservative history and to limit the ways one might imagine addressing racist education policies.

Indeed, the importance of Crespino's intervention is to complicate scholarship on the conservative white South so that we don't continue thinking of places like Mississippi as singularly egregious in their racism and conservatism--a habit of thinking that would have us overlook the more invidious and subtle forms of national racism and conservatism. And just why should we care about Mississippi? Precisely, Crespino says, because historians and social scientists have traditionally considered it non-representative of the nation--which, Crespino shows, isn't quite the case. Indeed, Mississippi's more overtly hateful politics is, in an important sense, simply the flip side of what Crespino calls American conservatives' ambivalence "about the principle of equality in modern politics" (10)--that is, the flip side of what have become legitimate forms of exclusion and enforced inequality.

In the end, Crespino's book offers copious and convincing evidence in support of his argument. Not only that, it does so with elegant prose. This is an important contribution to scholarship on the history of race and politics, and one suspects it will become necessary reading for those who expect to advance this disciplinary conversation.