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Free eBook How Sweet It Is: The Story of Dixie Crystals and Savannah Foods download

by Arthur Gordon

Free eBook How Sweet It Is: The Story of Dixie Crystals and Savannah Foods download ISBN: 0963465309
Author: Arthur Gordon
Publisher: Savannah Foods & Industries in (October 1, 1992)
Language: English
Pages: 109
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1912 mb
Size FLAC: 1349 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: mobi docx rtf txt


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How Sweet It Is book. Most histories of corporations are for the birds. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. How Sweet It Is: The Story of Dixie Crystals and Savannah Foods.

Most histories of corporations are for the birds. Certainly not for people. They are full of facts. They bristle with statistics.

Check out this cool song from Dixie Crystals: ww. ugarpacketchad. Taken on February 16, 2010.

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The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar and Six More is a collection of seven short stories written by Roald Dahl. They are generally regarded as being aimed at a slightly older audience than many of his other children's books. The stories were written at varying times throughout his life

Tuesday, February 22, 2011. How Sweet It Is; The Story of Dixie Crystals and Savannah Foods.

the story of dixie crystals and Savannah Foods. Georgia, Savannah, United States.

PC - being politically correct (20th century). 40. 90. Bagonise - a nonce-word (20th century).

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"Most histories of corporations are for the birds. Certainly not for people. They are full of facts. They bristle with statistics. They offer photographs of factories, old and new. They pay solemn tribute to departed captains of industry. But when they come from the printing press, they go straight onto library shelves where they gather dust for eternity. In other words, nobody reads them. Why is this? Because usually they are unreadable. And why is that? Because the warmth and color and humor and excitement that make for good reading are lacking. Earnest, well-meaning, and dull, most corporate histories sound as if they had been written by an exceedingly well-informed corpse. We have tried to make this book different. I think that the author, Arthur Gordon, has done a marvelous job of capturing the spirit of the company. It is not so much the history of a company as the story of the men and women who built it. In the last analysis, a corporation is nothing hut a collection of human beings working together toward a common goal. It's the quality of these people, every one of them at every level of the enterprise, that determines whether that goal is met, whether the business flourishes or declines, whether it moves forward or back. My role is simply that of a catalyst, to stimulate and encourage wherever I can. But it is their loyalty and their patience and their willingness to work like tigers that over the past seventy-five years has enabled our company, as Kipling put it, to 'meet with Triumph and Disaster and treat those two impostors just the same.' To all of them my heartfelt and affectionate thanks as Savannah Foods and Industries moves into another seventy-five years of expansion and service to our customers, our community, and our nation" ("Foreword" by W.W. Sprague, Jr.).