» » 740 Park: The Story of the World's Richest Apartment Building

Free eBook 740 Park: The Story of the World's Richest Apartment Building download

by Michael Gross

Free eBook 740 Park: The Story of the World's Richest Apartment Building download ISBN: 0767917448
Author: Michael Gross
Publisher: Broadway Books; 9.10.2006 edition (October 10, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 576
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Americas
Size MP3: 1178 mb
Size FLAC: 1776 mb
Rating: 4.3
Format: txt docx lrf lrf


In 740 Park, Michael Gross penetrates the bewitching and private worlds of the privileged and very rich denizens of 740 Park .

In 740 Park, Michael Gross penetrates the bewitching and private worlds of the privileged and very rich denizens of 740 Park Avenue on New York’s Upper East Side. Gross, a born storyteller, delights in his tales of upstairs and downstairs over the decades in the grand building. This is social history at its best. 740 Park delves into the rarified world of one of the city’s most exclusive co-ops, where billionaires like Ronald Lauder, Steve Schwarzman, and David Koch rest their heads. Michael Calderone, New York Observer. 740 Park is a historical building that is worthy of the comprehensive and fascinating coverage that Michael Gross has devoted to it.

Электронная книга "740 Park: The Story of the World's Richest Apartment Building", Michael Gross. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "740 Park: The Story of the World's Richest Apartment Building" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

740 Park: The Story of the World's Richest Apartment Building is a non-fiction book by American writer Michael Gross. The book was initially published on October 18, 2005 by Broadway Books. The book concentrates on the 19-floor, Art Deco luxury condominium 740 Park Avenue designed by Rosario Candela and Arthur Loomis Harmon in 1929 and on several generations of the superrich who have lived there since its construction on the peak of the Great Depression.

The story of 740 Park Avenue sweeps across the twentieth century to today, and Michael Gross tells it in glorious, intimate and unprecedented detail. The Real Deep State: 740 Park. The Times notes that many of the perpetrators in the book’s pages live under the same Park Avenue roof, but doesn’t reveal the address, and names only one of them. That’s Steven Mnuchin, now Secretary of the Treasury, and one of the current administration’s few surviving Original Cheerleaders.

Michael Gross' new book provides a fascinating social history of a slice of the wealthiest New Yorkers who, over time, have occupied 740 Park Avenue, the "richest apartment building

Michael Gross' new book provides a fascinating social history of a slice of the wealthiest New Yorkers who, over time, have occupied 740 Park Avenue, the "richest apartment building.

Just For Today get free read 30 days !!! From the author of House of Outrageous FortuneFor seventy-five years, it?s been Manhattan?s richest apartment building, and one of the most lusted-after addresses in the world

Just For Today get free read 30 days !!! From the author of House of Outrageous FortuneFor seventy-five years, it?s been Manhattan?s richest apartment building, and one of the most lusted-after addresses in the world. One apartment had 37 rooms, 14 bathrooms, 43 closets, 11 working fireplaces, a private elevator, and his-and-hers saunas; another at one time had a live-in service staff of 16. To this day, it is steeped in the purest luxury, the kind most of us could only imagine, until now. The last great building to go up along New York?s Gold Coast, construction on 740 Park finished in 1930.

Venerable 740 Park Ave. has long been known for its embarrassment of riches. During the fire, Julia Koch - the wife of NYC’s richest man, David - rescued pricey paintings in a Hefty ba. etty Images. But lately, the building has been a public embarrassment. I couldn’t stay more than 10 minutes, one evacuee recalls of her post-fire visit.

Variety points out that according to the 2005 book by Michael Gross, 740 Park: The Story of the World’s . Mnuchin’s apartment, which overlooks Park Avenue, the most enviable view in the building, includes a private elevator that opens onto a marble foyer with a curved staircase.

Mnuchin’s apartment, which overlooks Park Avenue, the most enviable view in the building, includes a private elevator that opens onto a marble foyer with a curved staircase. The living areas on the first floor all feature fireplaces, and the large kitchen has an attached breakfast room. There are also servants’ quarters located near the kitchen.

of the World's Richest Apartment Building. I think in the current condo era, represents a previous generation of Manhattan wealth," Gross told Business Insider. But I think that the cyclical nature of real estate makes it a very good bet that co-ops will have a comeback, and the east side will have a comeback. There are currently four units with active listings in the building. Below, a roundup of those famous names

Library of Congress Call Number: F128. Personal Name: Gross, Michael, 1952-. Varying Form of Title: Seven forty Park.

Library of Congress Call Number: F128. Dewey Decimal Classification Number: 97. /1 22. Publication, Distribution, et. New York. Broadway Books, (c)2005. Projected Publication Date

From the author of House of Outrageous FortuneFor seventy-five years, it’s been Manhattan’s richest apartment building, and one of the most lusted-after addresses in the world. One apartment had 37 rooms, 14 bathrooms, 43 closets, 11 working fireplaces, a private elevator, and his-and-hers saunas; another at one time had a live-in service staff of 16. To this day, it is steeped in the purest luxury, the kind most of us could only imagine, until now. The last great building to go up along New York’s Gold Coast, construction on 740 Park finished in 1930. Since then, 740 has been home to an ever-evolving cadre of our wealthiest and most powerful families, some of America’s (and the world’s) oldest money—the kind attached to names like Vanderbilt, Rockefeller, Bouvier, Chrysler, Niarchos, Houghton, and Harkness—and some whose names evoke the excesses of today’s monied elite: Kravis, Koch, Bronfman, Perelman, Steinberg, and Schwarzman. All along, the building has housed titans of industry, political power brokers, international royalty, fabulous scam-artists, and even the lowest scoundrels.The book begins with the tumultuous story of the building’s construction. Conceived in the bubbling financial, artistic, and social cauldron of 1920’s Manhattan, 740 Park rose to its dizzying heights as the stock market plunged in 1929—the building was in dire financial straits before the first apartments were sold. The builders include the architectural genius Rosario Candela, the scheming businessman James T. Lee (Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis’s grandfather), and a raft of financiers, many of whom were little more than white-collar crooks and grand-scale hustlers. Once finished, 740 became a magnet for the richest, oldest families in the country: the Brewsters, descendents of the leader of the Plymouth Colony; the socially-registered Bordens, Hoppins, Scovilles, Thornes, and Schermerhorns; and top executives of the Chase Bank, American Express, and U.S. Rubber. Outside the walls of 740 Park, these were the people shaping America culturally and economically. Within those walls, they were indulging in all of the Seven Deadly Sins. As the social climate evolved throughout the last century, so did 740 Park: after World War II, the building’s rulers eased their more restrictive policies and began allowing Jews (though not to this day African Americans) to reside within their hallowed walls. Nowadays, it is full to bursting with new money, people whose fortunes, though freshly-made, are large enough to buy their way in. At its core this book is a social history of the American rich, and how the locus of power and influence has shifted haltingly from old bloodlines to new money. But it’s also much more than that: filled with meaty, startling, often tragic stories of the people who lived behind 740’s walls, the book gives us an unprecedented access to worlds of wealth, privilege, and extraordinary folly that are usually hidden behind a scrim of money and influence. This is, truly, how the other half—or at least the other one hundredth of one percent—lives.
User reviews
Brariel
OK, I admit it up front: Hi, I'm severely addicted to shelter porn. I adored "Philistines at the Hedgerows" and thought "Gilded: How Newport Became America's Richest Resort," was fascinating. A glimpse at "740 Park" made me think the hefty volume was going to be enthralling, but it was more a head-scratcher. First, I give major props to the author for what had to be a mind-boggling amount of research. OMG, the details in the book were a wonder to behold. Too bad they were so difficult to process and keep in order. What the book needed more than anything was a floor plan of each apartment with the names of the tenants and the years they lived in each. My husband only reads business and finance books along with some technology and other detailed non-fiction. I told him he might enjoy parts of this volume because it goes into such detail regarding the shenanigans of the bankers leading up to and during the Depression. I managed to read the whole book and did enjoy parts of it. Had no idea that Jackie Kennedy's grandfather, James Lee, was such a wheeler-dealer (he was the builder) or that she actually preferred her father, Black Jack Bouvier and his family. to the severe, humorless Lee family. The machinations of the board that ran the building when it was a co-op were interesting, as well. And, of course, all of the famous residents were subject to delicious stories. I just wish I could have kept it all straight as I slogged through. But, again, wow on the research.
Mpapa
This book is obviously meant for those interested in the lives of the financially elite, and reiterates the idea of "wretched excess". There are gems of insight into those lives, but the thought that these folks mean very little to the rest of us, something they care not a whit about, dominated my consideration as I read this.

If one is wanting to take a non-fiction look into the guarded world of big money, this book is for you.

It is well written, nicely documented and researched.
Kiutondyl
Although tough to follow and remember all the names of the players, this is still a great read if you want to escape for a while. My only dislike was the way the author jumped back and forth through time, making it really difficult to remember who was who and how they fit into the chapter. The subject is fascinating because it's hard to imagine this kind of lifestyle exists (especially to a middle class, "average" American).
Gaudiker
Amazingly complex research had to be accomplished to produce this compelled-to-finish book. It could serve as a name-dropper's punch list.

Anecdotally, the book documents the decline of class as an expected attribute among the rich. Most interestingly, it lays-out more clearly than ever before, the pathetic and multi-generational foundation of social duplicity and financial insecurity that perverted any potential genuine patrician values that might have been available in the ersatz-"aristocratic" background of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis.
Alsanadar
One of the most interesting books written that I have read. Mr. Gross is so thorough (like all his stories) that it is remembered long after reading. So fabulous!
nadness
If you want to know how people like the Koch Brothers and other billionaires really live, read this book. I heard about it in a documentary about the 1%. I was more annoyed as I turned the page. It's really sickening how greedy and uncaring these people are, but I recommend it, just as a psychological insight into these narcissists. The book is a little bit too long, and does become dry and tiresome, but it was worth the read.
Purebinder
The author did an excellent job in researching and writing for this book, however, it's the same thing over and over and over in each chapter but with different super rich people. I got way too bored with reading one after another and ended up never finished reading it. I gave the book away.
Still reading it but fascinating history of the building and the people who have lived there.