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Free eBook Inquisition: Book Two of the Aquasilver Trilogy (Aquasilva Trilogy, Book 2) download

by Anselm Audley

Free eBook Inquisition: Book Two of the Aquasilver Trilogy (Aquasilva Trilogy, Book 2) download ISBN: 0743427408
Author: Anselm Audley
Publisher: Star Trek; First Edition edition (October 1, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 416
Category: Fantasy
Subcategory: Fantasy
Size MP3: 1328 mb
Size FLAC: 1275 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: doc mobi txt rtf


Inquisition: Book Two of the Aquasilver Trilogy On the vast waterworld of Aquasilva, the priestly Domain controls magic, weather, and history itself

Inquisition: Book Two of the Aquasilver Trilogy On the vast waterworld of Aquasilva, the priestly Domain controls magic, weather, and history itself. With their army of fanatical holy warriors, the Sacri, the hooded Inquisitors advance across the globe, setting both books and human beings to the torch. Young Cathan, heir to the throne of Lepidor, has already escaped the Inquisition once.

Start by marking Inquisition: Book Two of the Aquasilva Trilogy as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Inquisition: Book Two.

Book Description Book Two of the Acclaimed AQUASILVA Trilogy! Only the fire-magic can hold back the encroaching darkness, but those who wield it, the fanatical priests of the Domain, would rule the entire world with an iron hand. Cathan of Lepidor return. Cathan of Lepidor returns home after the battle that has restored his province to freedom and the rule of its count, Cathan's father.

I fill my books with magic and enchantment, heroism and tragedy. I confront my characters with extraordinary things. Inquisition: Book Two of the Aquasilver Trilogy (Aquasilva Trilogy, Book 2) Oct 1, 2002.

Inquisition (2002) is the second volume in the Aquasilva Trilogy. In this book Cathan finally discovers who he is. At the same time, religious fanatics of the Domain continue to seek out heresy and Cathan in particular. After the battle that restored Lepidor to freedom, Cathan sets off on his travels again to find an answer to the storm-magic he used to save his clan. In the process he soon discovers a new secret that will change his life forever. Crusade (2003) is the final work in the Aquasilva Trilogy.

Inquisition by Anselm Audley - On the vast waterworld of Aquasilva, the priestly Domain . Book Two of the Aquasilver Trilogy.

Inquisition by Anselm Audley - On the vast waterworld of Aquasilva, the priestly Domain controls magic, weather, and history itself. Two more marines on duty at the gate of the palace waved us through and into the small whitewashed courtyard beyond; even with the tighter security since the invasion, they didn't need to check my identity. Like the houses, the palace gate was covered in scaffolding and the doors weren't yet finished.

Aquasilva Trilogy, Book . The astonishing follow-up to AudleyUs breathtaking debut novel, Heresy, Book Two is the dramatic tale of an inter-world struggle from fantasyUs freshest new voice.

Aquasilva Trilogy, Book 2. English. By (author) Anselm Audley. Format Hardback 416 pages.

Book Two of Inheritance. As always, this book is for my family. And also to my incredible fans. You made this adventure possible. Sé onr sverdar sitja hvass! 2. Synopsis of Eragon, Book One of Inheritance. hostilities would never again afflict their two races. peacekeepers, educators, healers, natural philosophers, and the greatest of. spellweavers-since being joined with a dragon makes one a magician. Under their guidance and protection, the land enjoyed a golden age.

On the vast waterworld of Aquasilva, the priestly Domain controls magic, weather, and history itself. Determined to crush every last spark of resistance against their despotic rule, they have launched a brutal Inquisition in order to root out dissent and heresy wherever they find them. With their army of fanatical holy warriors, the Sacri, the hooded Inquisitors advance across the globe, setting both books and human beings to the torch. Young Cathan, heir to the throne of Lepidor, has already escaped the Inquisition once. Now, as he and his companions embark on a hazardous voyage in search of potential allies, he finds himself keeping barely one step ahead of his vengeful foes. But the Domain is not the only power seeking Cathan. In decadent Thetia, a hidden conspiracy of dissidents plots to use him to further their own seditious purposes, while in his capital city of Selerian Alastre, the Emperor spins his webs of intrigue in the Imperial Palace....A sweeping epic that bears comparisons to both Tolkien and Frank Herbert, Inquisition confirms the promise shown by Anselm Audley's outstanding debut, Heresy, and establishes him as an exciting new voice in fantasy and science fiction.
User reviews
Dikus
Audley writes a somewhat non-traditional Fantasy beginning set in what was one of the most creative environments I have read recently. The main character is very typical for most Fantasy in that he has powers he doesn't know about, is the son of a noble and gets caught up in a major struggle that will affect the world. Cliche....

The bad guys are a group of fanatic priests who are trying to control the whole world and make the worship of their God the only acceptable form of religion. They are bad, the good guys are good. Cliche....

Now, this is why the book got 4 stars. The setting is a planet where the ocean is much larger than what we have on Earth. Sea travel is a major theme and the author does a good job of reflecting the impact that distance and geography could have on a culture. Audley's ability to create a functioning economy and infrastructure in this planet borders on science fiction, but it was really cool. I liked the way that he incorporated magic into combat and didn't forget that using magic should be a really difficult thing. I had to buy this book used, but I will now be hunting for the next one because the first was that interesting.
Umsida
I read the whole series of these books, and they kind of lose steam after the first one. I wasn't expecting to get a hardcover (added bonus?), but I had lost my original copy and really wanted a replacement. Prompt shipping, good condition, all that jazz.

Either way I really like the book, and lent out my copy after recommending it and never got it back.
Iarim
Amazing Writer!
My favorite writer, i wish there was a movie produced on this trilogy.
SadLendy
Upon encountering a poorly written book, we frequently respond by labeling it juvenile and immature, and suggesting that we have a six-year-old waiting at home who could do better. Lately the publishing companies have dsicovered a possibly brilliant way to preempt this insult. They hire children to write books. "Heresy", by Anselm Audley, was written by a teenager. Moreover, it looks like it was written by a teenager. And I do not mean that as a compliment.

When I myself was an acned adolescent, I began working on a big epic fantasy. That project now languishes unpublished in my parents' attic, unfinished and unpublished because it contained no real plot. I was, at the time, more interested in world-building than in telling a story. In "Heresy", Anselm Audley has poured his heart into the details. You'll learn about which countries produce which goods and export them to where, and which religious sects believe what, and which cities have what forms of government. But as for anything actually happening to catch your attention, forget it.

Young Cathon is an orphan boy who, guess what, proves to be the long lost heir to the throne and possessor of whopping magical powers to boot. Arrayed against him we have a cliche band of evil priests, as well as some nasty traders of some sort from a "great house". Characterization flops totally, with Cathan showing barely any personality, and the villains failing to even reach the level comic book stereotype. Particuarly noxious is Cathan's relationship with a cycle of interchangable love interests, each more smashingly beautiful than the last. Times change, but teenage boys' sexual fantasies remain quite predictable.

Ever heard of space-fillers? The term gets redefined here. "The garden was specially designed to collect water below the soil and funnel off excess down the storm drains, thus ensuring the extra weight didn't bring the building down every time it rained." Even accepting the dubious proposition that drainage makes good fiction, I think we could have divined the purpose of the funnel without being told. After many hundred pages of this, Anselm tacks on a very hasty ending that totally doesn't fit with the rest of the book. And for writing skill, the lest said the better. Subordinate clause piles on top of ungainly subordinate clause, and Audley's abuse of the semicolon borders on criminal.

So to conclude, "Heresy" is yet another overhyped, underperforming wannabe in the fantasy field, a further insult to our intelligence from publishing companies that are leaking credibility faster than Donald Rumsfield. For real fantasy entertainment, may I suggest Memeory, Sorrow, and Thorn by Tad Williams or perhaps "The High House" by James Stoddard. These authors actually built their worlds around a story rather than the other way around. And they are, not coincidentally, adults.
Vichredag
Dear. God. What an awful book. Audley's total lack of skill shows frightening consistency. Four hundred pages and none of them worth reading. This is the first book in a very long time I have absolutely nothing good to say about.
Audley's prose is halting, cumbersome, infantile, full of run-ons, and deliberately pompous. Awkward words like "tiredness" keep popping up. The characters' actions are often illogical and entirely unmotivated, while their personalities change arbitrarily from chapter to chapter. Audley's worldbuilding efforts are laughable. If Aquasilva's global ocean is 11,000 miles deep, why do landmasses exist at all? What are "flamewood" and "seawood", besides cheap excuses not to invent real technology? The "mantas" have flown straight out of Star Trek, force-field defenses and all ("Increase shield strength as much as you can, and launch the pressure charges!") The politics of Audley's world are muddled and confusing. Half the countries mentioned aren't even on his map. Who conquered what and when are questions that long for real answers. When a king is assassinated, not only would I have been hard-pressed to identify what exactly he ruled, but that he existed at all. It is also unclear why Aquasilva's organised religion is so totally corrupt. Audley's bad guys aren't even bad as individuals; his Domain is a facelessly nefarious force of such absolute, uneffable evil that it must be hated wholeheartedly and without explanation.
As for the device of first-person narration - wishful thinking. In a certain scene a young woman rather spontaneously teaches the viewpoint hero "the arts of the night", which he finds rather pleasant. The young woman is never again mentioned. Cathan does however, have three other love interests, so that he can swtich between them as situation dictates. Throughout the book it is also revealed that he is a brilliant strategist, a superb swordsman, and the most powerful mage on the planet.
The bottom line is that Audley just doesn't know enough - as a writer as well as a person - to tackle a project of such scale. He cobbles together a semblance of a plot, and then barely manages to keep it from disintegrating. He tries to prove his worth as a storyteller through scrupulous attention to minor detail, which is not only distracting and irritating to the reader, but also exposes Audley's weaknesses, forcing him to demonstrate non-existent technical knowledge. A better writer would have done research... Because of this there are scenes of staggering, jaw-dropping idiocy, such as when Cathan conjures up and is washed away and covered "up to the neck" by a ton - one cubic meter - of water.
I would like to say that the author might improve with future novels, but I doubt he will. Audley shows no particular affinity for fantasy; he is looking for easy victories and takes too many shortcuts to generate anything worth reading. His debut is easily the worst book I've read all year.