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Free eBook The Onion Girl download

by Charles de Lint

Free eBook The Onion Girl download ISBN: 1596062436
Author: Charles de Lint
Publisher: Subterranean; Signed, Limited edition (April 30, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 500
Category: Fantasy
Subcategory: Fantasy
Size MP3: 1635 mb
Size FLAC: 1322 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: mobi azw lrf rtf


By Charles de Lint from Tom Doherty Associates. Once upon a time there was a little girl who wished she could be anywhere else in all the wide world except for where she was.

By Charles de Lint from Tom Doherty Associates. Or more preferably still, she wished she could find some way to cross over into whatever worlds might lie beyond this one, those wonderful worlds that she read about in stories.

I love Charles de Lint, but I have a warning: If you've never read him don't read this as your first book. Try Someplace to Be Flying" or "Jack the Giant Killer" or any of his short story collections

I love Charles de Lint, but I have a warning: If you've never read him don't read this as your first book. Try Someplace to Be Flying" or "Jack the Giant Killer" or any of his short story collections. The Onion Girl is an ugly, brutal, emotional kick-in-the-teeth about childhood sexual abuse of a pair of sisters framed in an urban fantasy. I had a Norman Rockwell childhood and found it hard to finish because you can't help but feel for Jilly and her sister. And if anything Widdershins is worse

I love Charles de Lint, but I have a warning: If you've never read him don't read this as your first book. And if anything Widdershins is worse

The Onion Girl is a 2001 contemporary fantasy novel by Canadian writer Charles De Lint, which takes place in the Newford universe. It is the first Newford novel centering on the recurring character of Jilly Coppercorn, now a middle-aged woman

The Onion Girl is a 2001 contemporary fantasy novel by Canadian writer Charles De Lint, which takes place in the Newford universe. It is the first Newford novel centering on the recurring character of Jilly Coppercorn, now a middle-aged woman. The book was a finalist for the World Fantasy Award. De Lint published a sequel in 2006, Widdershins, and a 2007 prequel, Promises to Keep, the latter of which featured Jilly as a young woman.

This is a work of fiction. All the characters and events portrayed in this novel are either fictitious or are used fictitiously. All rights reserved, including the right to reproduce this book, or. portions thereof, in any form. This book is printed on acid-free paper.

Charles de Lint is the modern master of urban fantasy. Folktale, myth, fairy tale, dreams, urban legend-all of it adds up to pure magic in de Lint's vivid, original world. No one does it better. But the heart and soul of Newford has always been Jilly, her layers are as open on the outside as the bright neon lights and cheerful facades of stores and houses, but also as hidden within as what lies underground or secreted away behind closed doors. Much of this book is set north of the city where Jilly spent her childhood, as well as in an Otherplace, but the city is never far away, and Jilly continues to reflect it, no matter how far away she might travel.

Автор: de Lint Charles Название: The Onion Girl Издательство: Holtzbrink(MPS)/MPS . In novel after novel, and story after story, Charles de Lint has brought an entire imaginary North American city to vivid life.

2002 Язык: ENG Размер: 2. 8 x 1. 2 x . 8 cm Поставляется из: США Описание: In novel after novel, and story after story, Charles de Lint has brought an entire imaginary North American city to vivid life.

He has been a seventeen-time finalist for the World Fantasy Award, winning in 2000 for his collection Moonlight and Vines; its stories are set in de Lint’s popular fictional city of Newford, as are those in the collections Dreams Underfoot, The Ivory and the How, and Tapping the Dream Tree.

As we published the start of Jilly Coppercorn's story in Promises to Keep, it only seemed right that we do a special edition of The Onion Girl, perhaps the most important of the novels or stories to feature what may be Charles de Lint's most beloved character.This special edition of The Onion Girl will feature not only an original, exclusive introduction by Charles, but a full-color cover, and endsheets by Mike Dringenberg, who contributed the striking cover to Promises to Keep.The Onion Girl is set in the imagined North American city of Newford. It's a place where magic lights dark streets, where myths walk clothed in modern shapes, where a broad cast of extraordinary and affecting people work to keep the whole world turning.At the center of all the entwined lives of Newford stands a young artist named Jilly Coppercorn, with her tangled hair, her paint-splattered jeans, a smile perpetually on her lips--Jilly whose paintings capture the hidden beings that dwell in the city's shadows. Long a supporting character in the Newford stories, The Onion Girl is Jilly's own story. Behind the painter's fey charm there s a dark secret, and a past she s laboured to forget. That past is coming to claim her now, threatening all she loves."I m the onion girl," Jilly says. "Pull back the layers of my life, and you won't find anything at the core. Just a broken child. A hollow girl."She s very, very good at running. But life has just forced Jilly to stop.
User reviews
Wilalmaine
I love Charles de Lint, but I have a warning: If you've never read him don't read this as your first book. "Try Someplace to Be Flying" or "Jack the Giant Killer" or any of his short story collections. The Onion Girl is an ugly, brutal, emotional kick-in-the-teeth about childhood sexual abuse of a pair of sisters framed in an urban fantasy. I had a Norman Rockwell childhood and found it hard to finish because you can't help but feel for Jilly and her sister. (And if anything Widdershins is worse.)

Yes, read this and feel the pain inside it, but don't do it as your first foray into de Lint's Newford books.
Vut
The Onion Girl- one of my favorite books of all time. A fantasy, yes, but a fantasy book believably set in the present day. The Onion Girl is Jilly, and you will not forget her story when you reach the final page. Her story stays with you. "Pull back the layers of my life", she says, "and you won't find anything at the core. Just a broken child. A hollow girl." Jilly, her friends, her story, and the setting of Newford are vividly captured in the author's very capable hands. A perfect book to discover the magic in everyday. Highly recommended.
Vizil
It was the John Jude Palencar cover that first attracted my attention to "The Onion Girl." And after that happened, I wondered if the title of the book had anything to do with the tune of the same name on Holly Cole's fabulous "Dear Dark Heart" CD.

It does.

Having never read anything of Mr. De Lint's before, his imaginary city, Newford, with its remarkable array of characters, was totally new. No opinion is therefore offered here as to how this book compares with others in the series.

At any rate, the tale told here, and told quite well indeed (the Native American mythology sprinkled throughout is likely to intrigue you as much as the story itself), is the touching tragedy of one of Newford's beloved artists, Jilly Coppercorn, who's been wounded in a hit and run accident and is trying to recover (she refers to herself as the "broken girl" although she's apparently in early middle age at the time of the story).

As she lies in bed in the "real world" in her dream time she adventures in the fairytale-ish "Otherworld." (The constantly shifting points of view, and changes from first-person to third-person narrative only serve to heighten the sense of dislocation.) Jilly is known best for her fairie paintings and someone breaks into her studio while she's recovering from the accident and vandalizes them. Her friends, one of whom's a police lieutenant, try to find out who that person is, and whether it's the same person who ran her down.

The most memorable character, however, turns out to be Raylene Carter, who tells her story in the first person with a white trash dialect she uses to her advantage. A victim of child abuse (a subject that clearly concerns Mr. De Lint, as it should all of us), she has left her abusive family while still a teenager and seems to have spent most of the time after her departure to trying to get even. And then she finds her way into the Otherworld too. And then things really start getting interesting.

You'll probably care a lot for Jilly and her supportive friends (we should all be as lucky as she is) and Raylene and her accomplice Pinky Miller; and the minor characters are well drawn too: Toby, Lucinda, the Tattersnake, and even those "crow girls" who turn up for a cameo at the end, and provide a bit of fun, at a time when it's needed, both for Jilly's sake and ours.

Since the book's origins are North American, with its tradition of serious fiction being one thing and genre fiction quite another, it's assigned to the genre category and stamped "fantasy." But: what would have happened if Mr. De Lint had pretended he was merely translating from the Portuguese the work of, say, "Joao Da Silva," and had set the tale in an imaginary city in Brazil? Then, it probably would not have been stamped fantasy at all, but hailed as an exemplar of Latin American "Magic Realism." It might then have been taken to be serious fiction and classified differently by those who love literary taxonomy more than reading a good novel.

Which this is.
Whitehammer
Unlike many of DeLint's formulaic novels where his main character finds themselves up against an evil from some ancient past, this deals more with the heart, Jilly's Heart, to be exact. It was a delight to see him stray from what seemed to be a habitual path of the formulaic for this writer. I had become somewhat of a discouraged reader due to his constant plot repetition and poor resolutions of these plots. It was refreshing to see him finally break free of this and try something new.

Jilly, is perhaps, one of the most endeared characters in DeLint's Newford sorties and I was delighted to see that he finally took the step into letting us know about the family and past history of this beloved character.

This book can be ready without reading any of DeLint's Newford stories, but those who already have will find great joy in seeing many of the old favorites coming to visit Jilly while she is in the hospital.

A story more about regret and following the paths one is given, this has less to do with DeLint's normal "urban fantasy" style and more to do with the complexities between siblings, child neglect and incest. There is more context to this story and more fleshing out of Jilly than one had before, which, is still overwhelming.

A very sad and haunting story of two sisters caught in the same situation, it is an instersting trip into the human psyche as to how both characters deal with it.

The ending was sad but redeeming as it comcludes that above all, family is everything.
Kata
Some people have written that they found this story sad. That could be said about a lot of Charles de Lint books, because they are always about struggle. No one writes personal struggle better. Although there is an underlying story of the characters trying to help keep magic or the Otherworld alive, the characters are always struggling to grow and keep parts of themselves alive. I delayed buying this book because of a reviewer who said they had been excited about learning Jilly's background but depressed and disappointed by the book. Yes, the story is hard. But life is hard. Maybe one of the reasons I relate to Charles de Lint so well is that he writes truthfully about the hard parts. I've read this book twice already and I'll read it many more times. And in response to the previous reviewer, I liked both Jilly and Raylene. Maybe later stories will tell us more about Raylene.
Nnulam
I love Jillie, this was a very interesting look into her life outside of the original Newford series.
digytal soul
Good
Another favorite. Really liked learning more about Jilly. Life isnt easy, but it's a little easier with de Lint's stories.