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Free eBook Conqueror's Moon (Book One of The Boreal Moon Tale) download

by Julian May

Free eBook Conqueror's Moon (Book One of The Boreal Moon Tale) download ISBN: 0441012116
Author: Julian May
Publisher: Ace; Reprint edition (March 29, 2005)
Language: English
Category: Fantasy
Subcategory: Fantasy
Size MP3: 1339 mb
Size FLAC: 1663 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: rtf txt lrf lit


Ironcrown Moon: Part Two of the Boreal Moon Tale.

Ironcrown Moon: Part Two of the Boreal Moon Tale.

The Boreal Moon Tale. It’s called Night Preserver, one of the non-hurting sort, hardly worthy of the Lights’ notice, primed for defense against assassins dispatching me in my sleep

The Boreal Moon Tale. It’s called Night Preserver, one of the non-hurting sort, hardly worthy of the Lights’ notice, primed for defense against assassins dispatching me in my sleep. Surrender is such a seductive option when one is very old. My years number four score and one, and I’ll certainly die soon of something, whether it be the infirmities of age or foul play.

On a remote island, far in the Boreal Sea, four kingdoms have struggled against one another since time out of mind. Most mysterious is the marshland kingdom of Moss-feared by the others and ruled by the Sorcerers. She has written numerous books, including the four books of The Saga of Pliocene Exile, the two books of Intervention, and The Galactic Milieu Trilogy. She also collaborated with André Norton and Marion Zimmer Bradley on the successful fantasy novel Black Trillium. May lives in Bellevue, Washington.

I'm a big fan of the Saga of Pliocene Exile, and I also enjoyed the Galactic Milieu

I'm a big fan of the Saga of Pliocene Exile, and I also enjoyed the Galactic Milieu. So, since I was unable to get the books one by one as they appeared, I bought the entire Boreal Moon trilogy in one go, excited for a real treat. This wasn't it. From the start, the first book failed to capture my interest, but eventually, I forced my way into the story, and after a few chapters, it got better. The series relies on complex politics, and simplistic individual motivations.

Julian May. Ironcrown Moon: Part Two of the Boreal Moon Tale. One fee. Stacks of books. Julian May. Sorcerer’s Moon: Part Three of the Boreal Moon Tale. On the bookshelvesAll.

it is terrific throughout, demanding of your attention and intellect yet entertaining, suspenseful and very rewarding. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 15 years ago.

Conqueror's Moon book. May begins her third series (discounting the collaborative Trillium novels) with this story, part one of The Boreal Moon Tale. This is something which can be seen in a lot of post-Tolkien fantasy, of course. The setting is the island Originally published on my blog here in January 2004.

The boreal moon tale: book one julian may. ACE BOOKS, NEW YORK An Ace Book Published by The Berkley Publishing Group A division of Penguin Group (USA) Inc. Hudson Street New York, New York This is a work of fiction

The boreal moon tale: book one julian may. Hudson Street New York, New York This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents either are the product of the authorТs imagination or are used fictitiously, and any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, business establishments, events, or locales is entirely coincidental.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. A powerful fantasy adventure filled with dark magic and deadly intrigue, from the worldwide bestselling author of the Saga of the Pliocene Exile. Conrig Wincantor, Prince Heritor of Cathra, has a vision: to unite. Conrig Wincantor, Prince Heritor of Cathra, has a vision: to unite the whole island of High Blenholme under Cathran sovereignty. He has so far been thwarted in this ambition by his cautious, aging father, King Olmigon, who, though weak with illness, still clings firmly to the reigns of the government. Now Conrig has hit upon a scheme that will convince the Lords that his plan can suceed

The boreal moon tale. This novel is entirely a work of fiction. The names, characters and incidents portrayed in it are the work of the author’s imagination. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, events or localities is entirely coincidental. First published in Great Britain by Voyager 2003.

With his father on his deathbed, Prince Conrig of Cathra and his lover, the seductive sorceress Princess Ullanoth of Moss, have hatched a plan to reunite the warring kingdoms of High Blenholm under one supreme rule, in the first volume of the Boreal Moon Tale series. Reprint.
User reviews
Phain
This review covers the entire Boreal Moon trilogy (but the score above is for the individual book).

I'm a big fan of the Saga of Pliocene Exile, and I also enjoyed the Galactic Milieu. So, since I was unable to get the books one by one as they appeared, I bought the entire Boreal Moon trilogy in one go, excited for a real treat.

This wasn't it. From the start, the first book failed to capture my interest, but eventually, I forced my way into the story, and after a few chapters, it got better. But not much.

The series relies on complex politics, and simplistic individual motivations. The evil foe (the Salka) are a caricature - literally stupid, evil, slimy, green, tentacled baddies - sidestepping the fact that they somehow created the special magic sigils the entire trilogy depends on. Worse, the entire story ignores the fact that the slimy creatures are the aboriginal inhabitants of the island, and that humans displaced them through conquest. The fact that they want their land back just proves their evil nature. Good creatures who want their land back are fine, though.

The omniscient narrator tends to forget that the characters are not (meant to be) omniscient, and central figures keep picking up key bits of information almost at random. The magic system is barely examined, and is highly inconsistent - for example, "windscrying" (clairvoyance) is widely used, but virtually no one takes even simple precautions against it. This means that all sides can easily pick up opponents' plans - except when scrying mysteriously doesn't work (or isn't considered) - all too apparently for the convenience of the author. Finally, the resolution of the trilogy is very much ex machina.

May relies here heavily on an omniscient, yet coy and perpetually vague oracle/fate. She used this same technique to slightly better effect (though near-equal reader frustration) in the Galactic Milieu books. Having now read all her major works (including parts of the Trillium and Rampart Worlds series), I can say that she was at her best in Pliocene Exile, when her voice was fresh and the setting unique. Much less successful, though still interesting in the Galactic Milieu, which built on part of the same background. The Boreal Moon trilogy, however, uses the same techniques in a fairly standard-issue fantasy setting, and it just doesn't work.

The trilogy is slightly dull and convoluted in the first volume, but still worthwhile for May fans. The second volume (Ironcrown Moon (The Boreal Moon Tale)) is substantially less interesting, but does carry the story forward. The final volume (Sorcerer's Moon (The Boreal Moon Tale)) is a very hard slog indeed, and worth reading only for those who just can't stand to quit a story part way through.

If you enjoy Julian May and epic fantasy, skip this series.
Windbearer
I have almost nothing good to say about this book. the story is okay and the world is nor horrible. other than that, the entire book is pretty dismal. The writing is especially bad. I would never have guessed May wrote it. the dialogs are forced and unconvincing. The drive of the characters is not well explained or understood. even the main characters are pretty flat and uninteresting. the end is somewhat climactic, but falls very short of being epic. Worst of all, its hard to sympathize or like the proctagonists. in some parts of the book i was actually rooting for the evil guy because he was so pathetic and had such rotten luck.
Cherry The Countess
I don't like the story , it's too compicated and at the same time too simple. I liked his stories about the rampart worlds and the whole intervention series . This is not at the same level .
Vrion
Did not care about any of the characters. The opening section intimates everything is a flashback for a super-old Smudge, which immediately told me Smudge survives the entire thing, sucking out the suspense. I have a feeling Smudge is supposed to be the main character, but he got lost in the author's immense infodump in the early novel.

Main story was about a prince's conspiracy (the one Smudge serves) with a princess to take over the princess's nearby country. May's omniscience of narration lets the prince grasp out major plot points way too quickly to believe, making for a generally boring story without much in the way of obstacles.

Also for how much an advantage windscrying seems to be, no one takes precautions against it! If you are writing a magic spy novel, maybe consider people would indeed develop anti-spy magic and techniques to the super-common spying method?

When I had a hard time getting into the early book I skimmed several long sections, and still found myself unable to enjoy this story. Finally I gave up and decided this was not May's best work.