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Free eBook The Singing Sword download

by Jack Whyte

Free eBook The Singing Sword download ISBN: 0670845205
Author: Jack Whyte
Publisher: Penguin Books Canada, Limited; 1st Canadian Edition edition (1993)
Language: English
Category: Fantasy
Subcategory: Fantasy
Size MP3: 1689 mb
Size FLAC: 1346 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: lrf txt doc mbr


Читать онлайн - Whyte Jack. The Singing Sword Электронная библиотека e-libra. ru Читать онлайн The Singing Sword. The Singing SwordA Dream of Eagles 02Jack Whyte For Beverley. my personal Jean ArmourAUTHOR'S NOTEThe Singing Sword.

Читать онлайн - Whyte Jack. my personal Jean ArmourAUTHOR'S NOTEThe Singing Sword is a work of fiction, but the historical background against which the action of the story takes place is very real, and the major political events occurred as described herein. As we approach the turn of a new century, few of us understand much of what went on at the birth of the twentieth

A Dream of Eagles 02. Jack Whyte.

A Dream of Eagles 02. my personal Jean Armour. The Singing Sword is a work of fiction, but the historical background against which the action of the story takes place is very real, and the major political events occurred as described herein. As we approach the turn of a new century, few of us understand much of what went on at the birth of the twentieth.

The Singing Sword is the primary weapon of the fictional character Prince Valiant, a Knight of the Round Table in the service of King Arthur, in the long running comic strip Prince Valiant, created by Hal Foster in 1937. The Singing Sword's first appearance in Prince Valiant lore came in the "Ilene Abducted" story, first published in 1938. In this story, the original owner of the sword is Prince Arn of Ord, Valiant's rival for the beautiful maid Ilene.

The Singing Sword ( Camulod Chronicles - 2 ) Jack Whyte From Publishers Weekly A sequel to The Skystone, this rousing tale . A Dream of Eagles 02.

The Singing Sword ( Camulod Chronicles - 2 ) Jack Whyte From Publishers Weekly A sequel to The Skystone, this rousing tale continues Whyte's nuts-and-bolts, nitty gritty .

From Publishers Weekly. A sequel to The Skystone, this rousing tale continues Whyte’s nuts-and-bolts, nitty gritty, ls version of the rise of Arthurian Camulod and the beginning of Britain as a distinct entity

We know the legends: Arthur brought justice to a land that had known only cruelty and force; his father, Uther, carved a kingdom out of the chaos of the fallen Roman Empire; the sword Excalibur, drawn from stone by England's greatest king. But legends do not tell the whole tale.

Jack Whyte is a Scots-born, award-winning Canadian author whose poem, The Faceless One, was featured at the 1991 New York Film Festival

Jack Whyte is a Scots-born, award-winning Canadian author whose poem, The Faceless One, was featured at the 1991 New York Film Festival. The Camulod Chronicles is his greatest work, a stunning retelling of one of our greatest legends: the making of King Arthur's Britain. He lives in British Columbia, Canada.

The Singing Sword book. With The Camulod Chronicles, Jack Whyte tells us what legend has forgotten: the history of blood and violence, passion and steel, out of which was forged a great sword, and a great nation.

The Singing Sword continues the gripping epic begun in The Skystone: As the great night of the .

The Singing Sword continues the gripping epic begun in The Skystone: As the great night of the Dark Ages falls over Roman Britain, a lone man and woman fight to build a last stronghold of law and learning-a crude hill-fort, which one day, long after their deaths, will become a great city. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

With The Camulod Chronicles, Jack Whyte tells us what legend has forgotten: the history of blood and violence, passion and steel, out of which was forged a great sword, and a great nation.

User reviews
Anarahuginn
I had enjoyed the first book until the last part which seemed a rather hurried ending and where the main character's behaviour suddenly changed. Here was a man who hated killing people involved in an assassination attempt with two co-conspirators and no remorse at the death of his colleagues??? It didn't fit the character build up. This book was the same; a long tedious part about him becoming engrossed in an affair to a man devoted to his wife whose every glance sends his heart beating and considered a "paragon" by his brother-in-law. It doesn't fit. So this book felt stilted I'm not sure if I'll bother with the rest. However the historic detail was interesting.
Jaiarton
The Singing Sword is a really excellent beginning to a 9 volume saga of historic fiction (merging with mythology) which attempts to set the Arthur legend into what we can realistically know about Britain starting in the 5th century of the common era.

The author has done his homework; there is great verisimiltude in the details of how the Roman legions (where we start) were organized and how they operated in the far reaches of the Empire. He obviously has closely studied much of the historical record regarding how the fall of the Empire impacted the complex nature of the polity in Britain at the time.

But like good historical fiction, he interplays his research and narrative with interesting characters, each of whom have a political outlook which seems to represent major factions of the time.

It's fast-paced, compelling, and a page turner. Before I was half-way through, I had ordered the sequal.
Samut
Jack Whyte does a superb job in this first book in his version of the Arthur legend. This is the way Arthur really could have come to power. I've read this series (9 books in all) at least 5 times front to back and plan to read them again often at least once per year probably. I can't say enough good things about this author and this series!

The narrator of this story is Publius Varrus, and is the first of two books he narrates. They tell of the making of Excalibur and the Lady of the Lake among other elements. This is an historically based telling of the legend. The historical figures do and say the things they did and said in the 3rd century. Amazing read!
Kriau
Lays the background for subsequent books in series and made me want to continue to read about the series.
sunset of Roam rule in Britain. The noble ways of honor in the patrician class and duty and morals of Roman life divorced from the corruption and arena bloodshed and excesses is portrayed. Impressed with the research and Whyte's ability to reveal even the most daily mundane routines of life in the times. I really did fall in love with the characters of such admirable integrity.
Mr.Bean
This is volume two of a series that puts the legend of King Arthur into an historical perspective. There are other books or groups of books that have attempted this, most notably Mary Stewart's Merlin Chronicles - but Stewart never painted her picture with as big a brush as Jack Whyte does, and (so far at least) Whyte has done it without a hint of magic or any other type of fantasy.
This is not intended as a slap at Stewart; I think her series is fantastic. It's just that I never thought it was possible to tell the story of Arthur and Merlin from a "human" point of view, until now. Whyte has proved that it's possible. So far I've only read the first two books in the series ("The Skystone" and this one), and if the rest of Whyte's novels are as superbly intelligent and well-written as these two I believe that Mary Stewart has some serious competition on her hands.
Rose Of Winds
I found the first book in this series by chance at the bookstore. Once I started reading it, I couldn't put it down. It isn't your typical King Arthur and Camalot novel but rather tries to fit the legend into reality by looking at the history of the region. This novel as the second in the series just reaffirmed what a great series this was and I bought every book in the series as a result. It isn't just another Camalot novel but gives you a good impression of the history of the region at the time when King Arthur would have lived and creates a wonderful basis for what would become the legend of King Arthur, the knights of the roundtable and Camalot.
Broadraven
Probably the best of all novels dealing with the Arthurian legends. This book, second one of the series, blends history nicely with the author's skill as a writer to produce a very believable basis for the beginning and development of Arthurian Britain. I've read the entire series probably five times all in all and this was one copy that I either didn't have personally or wasn't in at the library.
Publius is still telling the story of the Colony in this tale. The battles and hardships the soldiers undergo at the fall of the empire is laid out in chilling detail. A wonderful second in this series. A fast moving and exciting story.