» » Time of the Transference (Spellsinger)

Free eBook Time of the Transference (Spellsinger) download

by Alan Dean Foster

Free eBook Time of the Transference (Spellsinger) download ISBN: 1857232496
Author: Alan Dean Foster
Publisher: ORBIT; New Ed edition (October 15, 1987)
Language: English
Pages: 280
Category: Fantasy
Subcategory: Fantasy
Size MP3: 1352 mb
Size FLAC: 1861 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: mbr lit lrf azw


The Time of the Transference" is the sixth volume in the enjoyable Spellsinger adventure about Jon-Tom . In this, the sixth book about the rock-n-roll singing wizard from another world, Foster maintains the level he set in the earlier books and creates an enjoyable read.

The Time of the Transference" is the sixth volume in the enjoyable Spellsinger adventure about Jon-Tom and colleague Mudge.

Spellsinger 06. Alan Dean Foster. Wouldn’t be the first time Clothahump’s entertained out-of-town visitors. Some sorcerers can get pretty wild when they’ve had a few. What if they’re friends of Clothahump’s from far away and they don’t want to be disturbed? I don’t care if they’re visiting from another planet.

Spellsinger (1983) is a fantasy novel by American writer Alan Dean Foster. The book follows the adventures of Jonathan Thomas Meriweather who is transported from our world into a land of talking animals and magic

Spellsinger (1983) is a fantasy novel by American writer Alan Dean Foster. The book follows the adventures of Jonathan Thomas Meriweather who is transported from our world into a land of talking animals and magic. It is the first in the Spellsinger series.

Alan Dean Foster (born November 18, 1946) is an American writer of fantasy and science fiction, who has written several book series, more than 20 standalone novels and many novelizations of film scripts. Foster earned a bachelor's degree in political science and a MFA from the University of California, Los Angeles and currently resides in Prescott, Arizona, with his wife. He is a cousin of singer Lesley Gore. Foster also holds multiple state and one world record in senior powerlifting.

Start by marking The Time of the Transference (Spellsinger, as. .

Start by marking The Time of the Transference (Spellsinger, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The sixth Spellsinger story by Alan Dean Foster opens with thieves invading the turtle wizard Clothahump’s tree, with these bandits dealt with, albeit at the expense of Jon-Tom’s duar, key to his spellsinging abilities, being broken. Thus, Jon-Tom fetches the otter Mudge for another quest to Strelakat Mews, in the jungle south of the city of Chejiji, well across the ocean. Other books include novelizations of science fiction movies and television shows such as Star Trek, The Black Hole, Starman, Star Wars, and the Alien movies.

Time of the Transference (1986) is a fantasy novel by American writer Alan Dean Foster. The book follows the continuing adventures of Jonathan Thomas Meriweather who is transported from our world into a land of talking animals and magic

Time of the Transference (1986) is a fantasy novel by American writer Alan Dean Foster. The book follows the continuing adventures of Jonathan Thomas Meriweather who is transported from our world into a land of talking animals and magic. It is the sixth book in the Spellsinger series. Nothing is forever in the magical world Jon-Tom has found himself trapped in and as such the duar he uses to create his music-based magic breaks after a battle to save Clothahump from a group of house burglars.

Alan Dean Foster (1946 - ) Born in New York City in 1946, Foster was raised in Los Angeles. After receiving Bachelor's and Master's degrees at UCLA, he spent two years as a copywriter for a small Studio City, California PR firm

Alan Dean Foster (1946 - ) Born in New York City in 1946, Foster was raised in Los Angeles. After receiving Bachelor's and Master's degrees at UCLA, he spent two years as a copywriter for a small Studio City, California PR firm. His writing career began in 1968 when August Derleth bought a long Lovecraftian letter of Foster's and published it as a short story. More sales of short fiction followed. His first attempt at a novel, The Tar-Aiym Krang, was published by Ballantine Books in 1972.

Another tale of talking animals and misdirected magic in the New York Times–bestselling author’s whimsical . The journey takes them to the ends of the earth-and beyond.

Another tale of talking animals and misdirected magic in the New York Times–bestselling author’s whimsical series: Foster knows how to spin a yarn (Starlog). Jon-Tom has been trapped in a strange land of talking owls and wizarding turtles for a year now, his sole consolation that in this universe his musical abilities have inadvertently made him something of a sorcerer. On the run from some half-wit pirates, they dart into a cave and find themselves in San Antonio, the shortcut to home that Jon-Tom has long dreamed about.

Alan Dean Foster22 sánzá ya míbalé 2011. Another tale of talking animals and misdirected magic in the New York Times–bestselling author’s whimsical series: Foster knows how to spin a yarn (Starlog).

WouldnтАЩt be the first time ClothahumpтАЩs entertained out-of-town visitors. тАЭ тАЬSo it isnтАЩt a party. What if theyтАЩre friends of ClothahumpтАЩs from far away and they donтАЩt want to be disturbed?тАЭ тАЬI donтАЩt care if theyтАЩre visiting from another planet. IтАЩve got a busy day tomorrow and I need my beauty sleep. тАЭ Angrily she put her fists on her hips. This did wonderful things to the rest of her body.

User reviews
CrazyDemon
For book 6, I liked it a lot. The novel once again had a few dry spots but ended up making up for them with a climactic and exciting moment. The ending did feel a bit akward but I say a good endings a good ending.

Series Review: I have read all 6 books in Spellsinger and I decided to do one big review to go with it. The story takes place in the 1980`s. The series main character, Johnathan Thomas Meriweter (Jon-Tom) gets trasported to anouther unnamed world where every mammal and bird evolved to the humans level. A confrotation with an otter by the name of Mudge (who is the secondary character and the anti-hero of the series) convinces Jon-Tom he is not on Earth any more. As I read the books, the author seemed to make a realist feeling. I`ve read many books and when it comes to feeling reality, this book really made me picture the story happening in the real world. The animal planet that Jon-Tom is on feels big and every town you read about feels diffrent than the others. Plus, a lot of refrences to our world from commercial T.V to Jimi Hendrix are made by Jon-Tom as he goes on life treatening quests. This style makes this book feel more home than the other sci-fy that I have read. The characters seem to be well developed. Sometimes they dont seem to speak in a normal tone but you can get the gist of what they are saying. Also, when you meet one animal, it`s hard to tell if it`s a basic average personality in the world you are reading about. For example, one racoon that the protagonists meet acts like he would sell his own mother for benefits while anouther is a team player who acts sympathetic. Just like the world, the people (and animals of the same spiecies seem to be exact) all come in many shades which is anouther real world feeling. The series does`nt escape critism from me though. At times, the quality seems to feel dry and there is a repeat pattern. The protagonists get in a life or death situation and somehow Jon-Tom spellsings his way out or his companions solve the problem. It`s repeat pattern does seem to be a disapointment but then again, it does`nt feel like it`s a rewind as the situations tend to vary. Also, Allen Dean Foster seemed to make his characters say witty remarks that try to make it funny but it feels a bit corny at times. Still, the lame jokes are enough to make you smile. The series also has book 7 and book 8 but the series seemed to drag on after the climax which wears it out. I`d say you skip the last 2 books and stop at book 6. The last book also had false advertising as Time of Transferance was described as the thrilling climax but continued. Still, the plot lines feel original and well polished with laces of reality, pop culture, classic tunes and well developed characters who seem to reflect real life in a way. For an old series, it makes me happy to have accidently discovered it. It may be hard to get, but 98% of me says if your willing to, go for it and try to get the series. It is almost always worth reading it.
Dolid
How can you mend a broken heart? Easier than you can mend a broken Duar! Without his beloved instrument Jon-Tom may be done as a Spellsinger! A quest is in order to find the only being that may be able to help with repairs.

Our characters have grown in this installment and are even getting ready to settle down, but a happy ending isn't as easy as that!
Kemath
I've read all the spell singer books and this is by far one of the best and a great conclusion to the series
Malodor
great read
ndup
I read this series a forever ago, and still enjoy it now. Very high price for an old book, though.
Anazan
Loved the whole series
Lo◘Ve
"The Time of the Transference" is the sixth volume in the enjoyable Spellsinger adventure about Jon-Tom and colleague Mudge.

Back cover of book:

There's No Place Like Home...

It was a pretty good life for a spellsinger from L.A. He'd battled demons, fought deadly Plated Folk, even met a socialist dragon and survived. Now Jon-Tom was quite happy to settle into domestic bliss with the fiery Talea, study magic, and practice spellsinging on his duar. But the magic instrument is broken when Jon-Tom protects the wizard Clothahump from thieves and he must set out across the Glittergeist Sea to find the one person who can fix it. With the irrepressible Mudge the Otter as a traveling companion, only the unexpected can happen. But cannibal muskrats, ogres, and a fierce pirate king parrot seem ordinary indeed when Jon-Tom finds a way back to Earth - and he must choose which world is home.

End back cover of book.

Although I am amazed at the creativity in the exploits of Jon-Tom and Mudge, the continuous dangers faced can become mind numbing. I enjoy the strange characters he meets, especially those with a phobia or a personal problem. This book is a pleasant read but not as colorful as the earlier ones in descriptions of the environment and attire of the inhabitants of the world. As the back cover indicates, Jon-Tom finds a way back to Earth and one would hope this novel or the next would have an involved exploit. Unless one is a fanatic about a complete series, I would suggest ending with this book knowing of the next and final two volumes. "Son of Spellsinger" and "Chorus Skating" didn't leave a great impression on me as the first six. "Son of Spellsinger" deviated from the norm with the offspring of Jon-Tom and Mudge while "Chorus Skating" doesn't have the high energy as the earlier ones.

As a fan of the classical, rock, and heavy metal music genres, I find the magic Jon-Tom creates with his duar exciting since I believe a well-constructed song can affect people with its intensity and power in a primal aspect.

Thank you.
The Spellsinger series is not my favorite, but to give Foster credit, the quality of his writing is fairly consistent. If this had been an Anthony or a Chalker series, by the sixth book the story would have broken down completely.

In this, the sixth book about the rock-n-roll singing wizard from another world, Foster maintains the level he set in the earlier books and creates an enjoyable read. Jon-Tom faces the biggest villain of all-- his own desire to go home.

The plot is not perfect in the Time Of The Transferance. It meanders a bit more than it should. Foster really seems to forget the mission in some places and get caught up in cannibals and bad puns. Still, fans of Spellsinger should not be disappointed. As usual, people new to the series should begin at the beginning with Spellsinger and not here.