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Free eBook Echo City download

by Tim Lebbon

Free eBook Echo City download ISBN: 0553593226
Author: Tim Lebbon
Publisher: Spectra (October 26, 2010)
Language: English
Category: Fantasy
Subcategory: Fantasy
Size MP3: 1924 mb
Size FLAC: 1648 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: lit doc docx rtf


Lebbon Ti. im Lebbon Echo city As it left the city, the thing did not once look back Читать онлайн Echo city. Lebbon Tim. Tim Lebbon.

Lebbon Ti. im Lebbon Echo city As it left the city, the thing did not once look back. It walked with heavy steps, looked forward with rheumy eyes, and its misted breath soon dispersed in the air. It did not look back, because its purpose was ahead, and large though this thing was, its brain was small and simple, its reason for being very precise. It moved away from the world and out into the Bonelands, and it would never return. Читать онлайн Echo city. As it left the city, the thing did not once look back.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Surrounded by a vast, poisonous desert, Echo City is built upon the graveyard of its own past

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Surrounded by a vast, poisonous desert, Echo City is built upon the graveyard of its own past. Most inhabitants believe that their city and its subterranean Echoes are the whole of the world.

See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Echo City by. Tim Lebbon (Goodreads Author).

Tim Lebbon (born 28 July 1969, London) is a British horror and dark fantasy writer. Lebbon was born in London. He lived in Devon until he was eight and then in Newport until the age of 26. He now lives in Goytre, Monmouthshire with his wife and two children. Lebbon′s short story ″Reconstructing Amy″ won the Bram Stoker Award for Short Fiction in 2001, his novel Dusk won the 2007 August Derleth Award from the British Fantasy Society for best novel of the year

Tim Lebbon brain was small and simple, its reason for being very precise. Darkness concealed the start of its journey. It was aware of people in the buildings and ruins around it, but Skulk Canton was a place whose residents would keep to themselves. If they did not, its maker had instructed it to force their.

He has won four British Fantasy Awards and a Bram Stoker Award, and several of his books and short stories are in development as movies

He has won four British Fantasy Awards and a Bram Stoker Award, and several of his books and short stories are in development as movies. He lives in South Wales with his wife and two children.

Город: A mystical village in WalesПодписчиков: 6 ты. себе: Horror and thriller writer

Город: A mystical village in WalesПодписчиков: 6 ты. себе: Horror and thriller writer. Author of The Silence (Netflix) and others. Lover of endurance sport, coffee, and cake. Hair never suited me.

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Surrounded by a vast, poisonous desert, Echo City is built upon the graveyard of its own past. Most inhabitants believe that their city and its subterranean Echoes are the whole of the world, but there are a few dissenters. Peer Nadawa is a political exile, forced to live with criminals in a ruinous slum. Gorham, once her lover, leads a ragtag band of rebels against the ruling theocracy.

Surrounded by a vast, poisonous desert, Echo City is built upon the graveyard of its own past. Most inhabitants believe that their city and its subterranean Echoes are the whole of the world, but there are a few dissenters. Peer Nadawa is a political exile, forced to live with criminals in a ruinous slum. Gorham, once her lover, leads a ragtag band of rebels against the ruling theocracy. Nophel, a servant of that theocracy, dreams of revenge from his perch atop the city’s tallest spire. And beneath the city, a woman called Nadielle conducts macabre experiments in genetic manipulation using a science indistinguishable from sorcery. They believe there is something more beyond the endless desert . . . but what? It is only when a stranger arrives from out of the wastes that things begin to change. Frail and amnesiac, he holds the key to a new beginning for Echo City—or perhaps to its end, for he is not the only new arrival. From the depths beneath Echo City, something ancient and deadly is rising. Now Peer, Gorham, Nophel, and Nadielle msut test the limits of love and loyalty, courage and compassion, as they struggle to save a city collapsing under the weight of its own history.
User reviews
Marinara
Echo City had some really interesting things going for it. There's a strong theme of willful ignorance of the past...its talked about often and takes physical form in the way the city is layered atop the ruins of older cities. But its not really ruins as you would think of them...there are entire empty cities in layers below the current one. The even have large empty orchards. Nowhere is there any attempt to explain how these huge areas become encapsulated so that a new city can be suspended on top of them, but I felt this could be looked at more as symbology due to the part it plays in the consistant theme of past/present.

The city is populated by the decendants of those who survived some long forgotten, man-made disaster that has made all land surrounding the city a poisonous wasteland. At some points, I felt there were some favorable comparisons to Hugh Howey's Wool series. The only real "technology" that wasn't swords'n'castles was that posessed by the Baker, who was able to manipulate, blend and grow biological mutations. Some were quite imaginative, such as the rather creepy living telescopes. But the problem I had with this "technology" continued to grow as I got further and further into the book and there still was no explanation about the science.

Rather, there were numerous statements that "this may appear like magic, but its technology". But the "tech" consisted of tossing some ingredients into "large, bubbling vats", stir, add water, and presto! out pops a 15yr old clone (memories of past life intact), all inside of 24 hours. Or out pops elephant sized warrior monsters...although they may have take 36 hours. It just came down to, in my opinion, calling magic technology...picture Gandolf scoffing at the idea that he does magic and you get the idea.

Spoiler Alert:

But there's still interesting things going on, decent characters and such. Where the wheels really start to come off for me was the beginning of the final, mad dash..except it stretched out for over 30% of the book. It began with needing to kidnap the god-figure-head (Rufus) of a militant sect that was ready for war. Rufus sat in front of thousands of his followers, and was snatched away by 4 invisible good guys...perhaps it sounds plausible, but it was really absurd. There was even a converstation to the effect: "Shouldn't we make a plan?" "No, plans take to long". Anyway, it was at this point that the book lost any semblence of solid scify, and began its turn into YA Fantasy.

After they grabbed Rufus from under the noses of all these warriors and were running for their lives, Absurd Event #2 happens: they encounter a friendly force led by Dane that saves them. Not having read it, this may sound plausible...however, it isn't. Last we saw Dane, he was a long ways away, going looking for the Baker in the other direction, had no clue where our heros were, where they might be headed, not even any idea what they might be doing. It was completely disconnected. And yet, as if by magic, here they are to save the day. No attempt was ever made to justify this.

And these two absurd events kicked off one of the longest, most boring car chases you ever want to read. What really made it boring was that the final half of the book was so predictable...no twists at all. I found that by the end, the only reason I was still reading was because I was curious as to what would occur once they fled accross the desert to the "Heart and Mind" land. And the joke was on me, because as they all finally were passing out thinking they'd failed, the final sentence of the book is "The Heart and Mind sees you, and you are welcome." bleh
Hatе&love
Peer has been banished to Skulk for her political - and religious - beliefs. They would have banished her further but the desert surrounding Echo City is utterly inhospitable to life. As one of the Watchers, Peer believes that there must be more to the world than Echo City and that one day, there has to be a way to leave. When she sees a man walking into the City from the desert, all her hopes - and fears - are realised and she must find her way back into the City that cast her out.

Echo City is an incredible setting where layer upon layer of the city has been built upon each other in the only area of land that seems to support life. The City plays host to a series of fascinating characters, not the least of which is the latest in the long-line of Bakers who tamper with nature to create creatures caught between life and functionality as machines. Each character has a rich tapestried background and they draw you into the story. As layers of the City are revealed, so too are its secrets and it draws the reader deeper and deeper.

I did find my interest flagged momentarily in the centre of the book, but for most of it, I found it emotionally gripping. The plot is clever and satisfying - definitely worth a read.
Hulbine
I thought this book was worth reading. I'd say it was a good story, well written, and with engaging characters populating an interesting world, but I probably prefer his books 'Dusk' and 'Dawn' more. I recommend all three without question! My only disappointment with 'Echo City' was with the ending: Things seemed a bit rushed, not just in terms of the action but also the storytelling. That's just my subjective impression, take it or leave it.... As far as the ending itself, I think I'd have been happier without the last few lines. I can almost imagine the publisher/editor insisting that it resolve this way, and the spare way in which it was told seems to even hint that its inclusion was under protest. More subjective impressions, I know, but this is my review and I'm not going to pretend it didn't strike me this way. Still, I enjoyed the read, and found I couldn't put it down at times.

Buy the book! Tim Lebon is a fantastic author.
luisRED
I wasn't impressed with this book. The story falls flat.
Priotian
Very entertaining.
Memuro
a little weirder than i thought but i like it. disjointed character descriptions.....a little wordy in places.....i wanted to put it down a few times but once i made to the halfway point i just had to know what was "rising" from the chasm.....good book for cleansing your fiction palate as i haven't read many books like it....except maybe china mieville's....give it a try.